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Review affirms higher vitamin D levels are associated with a reduced risk of premature mortality.

The results of a systematic view published on June 12, 2014, in the American Journal of Public Health reaffirms what a number of studies conducted over the past decade have indicated: Having a higher serum level of vitamin D is associated with a lower risk of dying prematurely. *

Cedric Garland, DrPH, and colleagues selected 32 studies that provided data on a total of 566,583 men and women for their analysis. They determined that having a vitamin D level of 30 ng/mL is associated with approximately half the risk of dying over an average nine years of follow-up in comparison with lower levels. Dr. Garland, who is a professor at UC San Diego, noted that serum levels of vitamin D lower than 30 ng/mL are estimated to exist in two-thirds of the US population.

Editor's Note: Dr. Garland observed that, "Three years ago, the Institute of Medicine (IOM) concluded that having a too-low blood level of vitamin D was hazardous. This study supports that conclusion, but goes one step further. The 20 ng/mL blood level cutoff assumed from the IOM report was based solely on the association of low vitamin D with risk of bone disease. This new finding is based on the association of low vitamin D with risk of premature death from all causes, not just bone diseases." Life Extension continues to recommend that people maintain 25-hydroxyvitamin D blood levels between 50-80 ng/mL.

Reference

* Am J Public Health. 2014 Jun 12.

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Title Annotation:In The News
Author:Dye, D.
Publication:Life Extension
Article Type:Brief article
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Oct 1, 2014
Words:247
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