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Researchers Develop New Hydrogen Extraction Method.

Japanese news service Nikkei recently reported that researchers with Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Ltd., JBC Corporation and the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology have developed a new hydrogen extraction method for coal and organic materials, including biomass, plastics and oils, that achieves a 75-percent conversion efficiency without emitting carbon dioxide (CO2).

According to Nikkei, the new process involves the introduction of calcium oxide into a reaction chamber that is designed to decompose organic wastes into hydrogen and CO2. Nikkei noted that the calcium oxide "converts the CO2 into calcium carbonate," which is then heated in a different chamber to "regenerate CO2 and calcium oxide."

After trapping the regenerated CO2, Nikkei said the researchers then return the heated calcium oxide to the original reaction chamber "where its heat further boosts the efficiency of the hydrogen generation process."

Nikkei reported that the researchers plan to construct an "experimental system" capable of processing 50 kilograms of organic material per day by next fiscal year.

(NIKKEI: 1/28)

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Publication:Fuel Cells Today
Date:Jan 30, 2004
Words:173
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