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Reflecting on the changing seasons.

The leaves are changing, the weather is cooling, and families are already a month deep into a routine of school schedules and fun weekend activities. It's a changing of seasons, the end of one frame of time and the beginning of another.

It's refreshing to take the opportunity, during the cusp of any changeover, whether it's a changing season in life, job or other, to reflect on the past season and plan for the coming one. What happened over the last several months? What did I learn? How was life changed?

Just as nature and life has the flow of seasons, so did our resource and advocacy organization of Exceptional Family TV. In early September, EFTV closed out on Season One of its programming, completing a full 20 individual episodes of content geared towards parents and families raising children with special needs.

The episodes offered several families, from across the United States and one from Australia, a voice to the world, a chance to showcase their life and unique family situation of raising a child with special needs. There were several episodes exposing the raw emotions of both mothers and fathers in their individual roles and perspectives as exceptional parents. Several therapies were also overviewed, along with programs serving the special needs community.

In this reflective state of changing seasons, it's also important to thank those who helped you along the way. EFTV was made possible by the support of key organizations. If it wasn't for these organizations, there might not have been a Season One in the first place. EFTV would like to thank Exceptional Parent magazine for their support and this column; Warm Springs Productions for the use of their equipment and production help; Bridgeworks Creative for the website development and maintenance; the audience and viewers for their support; and all the exceptional families, organizations and volunteers serving the special needs community who opened up their lives and shared their stories.

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From the past season, EFTV has learned there is a strong willingness and desire among exceptional families not only to share their story, but also to help others and connect in community, comforting one another in our journeys to show we are not alone. It's a powerful concept, knowing that you're not alone in a situation. It's one both empowering and reassuring in the journey we all share raising those with special needs.

The best part of the end of a particular season is looking forward to what the next season has in store.

Season Two begins this month with fresh episodes along with brand new content in our "Fam Cam" and "Informational" videos section. This new season will feature: an interview with Taylor Morris, an Autism and Asperger's advocate who talks about what it's like to have an "Aspie" mind; a saddle-maker from Arkansas who specializes in crafting personalized saddles to accommodate anyone with special needs; a ranch in Tennessee breeding and training therapy dogs and donkeys; fundraiser ideas; and more personal stories from exceptional families.

All of us at EFTV wish you the best in whatever your particular changing of seasons may be, and hope you stay tuned to watch Season Two of Exceptional Family TV.

To watch the 20 episodes of Season One, and see the start of Season Two, visit Exceptional Family TV [www.exceptionalfamilytv.com].

Nathan is father to Zachary, who has spastic quadriplegia cerebral palsy, husband to wife Renee, and the host of an online web-TV series, Exceptional Family TV, covering the stories and personal journeys of exceptional families.
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Title Annotation:Exceptional Family TV
Author:Charlan, Nathan
Publication:The Exceptional Parent
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Oct 1, 2010
Words:590
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