Printer Friendly

Rafik Hariri's living legacy.

Summary: Misinformation, political takedowns and refusing to give credit where it's due have become characteristics of Lebanese politics from top to bottom.

Misinformation, political takedowns and refusing to give credit where it's due have become characteristics of Lebanese politics from top to bottom.

The latest example is a statement by the country's very highest official saying that the Lebanese shouldn't expect miracles after seven months when the country has been left to rot for 27 years.

A curious declaration, to be sure, because anyone with half a memory knows how unjust a statement this is to the late Rafik Hariri.

For those suffering from amnesia, here's a little refresh of some of the former premier's achievements that speak for themselves.

Hariri built an international airport and highways that criss-cross the country.

In Beirut, he addressed the rubble created by parties now dismissing his achievements, and recreated a capital for the nation and the region.

The premier attracted investments and visitors alike, with some 1 million tourists visiting a year. And by giving 30,000 scholarships to top universities, he developed the Lebanese's future, as well as present.

In those 27 years, 15 of which Lebanon lived under Syrian hegemony, Hariri had to deal with officials that were puppets bent on politically assassinating him. When that failed, his detractors assassinated him outright, and the rest is history.

We have come to the stage when ignoring the past and refusing to build on what is already there will only lead the country to further ruin.

Statesmen must be magnanimous and pick up where others have left off, not dabble in petty politicking.

Demagoguery is two a penny these days. If politicians really want to build a legacy they should do it in deeds, and avoid trashing others' achievements.

In retrospect, with his renovation of Baabda Palace -- it lay in tatters after it was vacated in 1990 -- Rafik Hariri even built a home for presidents. And that's not something to be sniffed at.

Copyright [c] 2017, The Daily Star. All rights reserved. Provided by SyndiGate Media Inc. ( Syndigate.info ).

COPYRIGHT 2017 SyndiGate Media Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2017 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:The Daily Star (Beirut, Lebanon)
Date:May 16, 2017
Words:346
Previous Article:Tehran's mayor drops out of election to back hard-liner.
Next Article:Yemen rebels declare state of emergency over cholera outbreak.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2022 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters |