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ROSEY GRIER LOOKS TO BLITZ PROSTATE CANCER.

Byline: - Nicole Sunkes

As one of the Los Angeles Rams' ``Fearsome Foursome,'' former defensive lineman Rosey Grier was a force to be reckoned with on the football field. Today, Grier is fighting on different turf - he's working with the Prostate Cancer Foundation to raise awareness about the disease.

``It's a way to see a lot of people working together (fighting against cancer),'' said Grier, who has never had the disease. ``People always feel secure that there's someone on the battle line fighting for them. It has been a real, real dream for me to do something about the people who suffer from prostate cancer.''

Two of the four men in the Rams' ``Fearsome Foursome'' survived prostate cancer, and Grier wants to let people know about the foundation's research efforts. This year, taxpayers in California and New York can contribute to the Prostate Cancer Foundation's work.

Line 64 of California tax forms allows for a donation to the foundation's Prostate Cancer Research Fund.

Vice chairman and CEO Leslie Michelson said all the money raised from line 64 donations will go to research facilities in California.

``It's a very efficient way for people to support causes that are important to them,'' Michelson said.

Grier, 72, has served on the Prostate Cancer Foundation's board of directors since 1993. A good friend, Michael Milken, founded the organization that year after surviving prostate cancer.

Prostate cancer is the most common nonskin cancer in the country, and one in six males will get the disease. African-American men are 65 percent more likely to be diagnosed with it and twice as likely to die.

``I will do whatever I can (to educate people about prostate cancer),'' said Grier, who played professional football from 1955 to 1966. ``Everywhere I go, I ask men if they are getting examinations. A lot of men don't like to talk about it.

``When you want to fight something, you know you need a team,'' Grier said.

For more information about the Prostate Cancer Foundation's visit www.prostatecancerfoundation.org or call (800) 757-2873.

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Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Mar 28, 2005
Words:345
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