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REMARKABLE RAYMOND LOEWY, STUDEBAKER'S DESIGNER, IS LATEST IN TAPLINGER BOOK SERIES ON HEROES OF DESIGN

 JERSEY CITY, N.J., April 28 /PRNewswire/ -- If the Studebaker was possibly his most famous design, and one of his most controversial, anyone interested in design will want to know more about Raymond Loewy's remarkable other designs.
 This famed and highly controversial designer, whose streamlined trains became the favorite subject of art deco artists, ranged far and wide across the field of design, from consumer products like the Coldspot refrigerator and the Halicrafter radio, to interiors for Lord & Taylor's and Skylab -- according to Paul Jodard, author of "Raymond Loewy" ($24.95, Taplinger), latest in a series called "Design Heroes."
 "Loewy was certainly controversial, some said because of his relentless self-promotion," says Jodard, who teaches design and has written extensively in the field, "but few deny he was a towering figure in industrial design."
 Also in the series distributed by Parkwest Publications and available in bookstores (or call 201-432-3257) are similar extensively illustrated volumes on "Buckminster Fuller" by Martin Pawley, editor of the series; "Ettore Sottsass" by Jan Burney; and "Harley Earl" by Stephen Bayley. Each book examines in depth the life and work of the designer and his profound influence on 20th century life and social history:
 -- Jodard writes how the French-born Loewy came to the United States in 1922 and by the end of 1940s ran the largest design agency in the country.
 -- Buckminster Fuller is remembered as a dreamer, an urbanist and a believer in a technology-led future. His Dymaxion house led to prefabricated buildings; his geodesic dome cannot be underestimated; and his concern for the environment and interest in technology mark him as a man before his time. The author is architecture correspondent of The Guardian and has written widely on architecture and design.
 -- Ettore Sottsass's career highlights the connection between design and industry in Italy. His work for Olivetti covers early electronic computers, typewriters, video terminals and office systems. In 1980, he abruptly changed to post-modern design, using harsh colors and unusual shapes, writes Burney, former editor of Designer magazine.
 -- Harley Earl gave American cars of the 1950s their distinctive flash and swagger, all tailfins, two-tone color and chrome. As the head of styling at General Motors, he gave cars such as the Cadillac El Dorado and the Chevy Corvette motifs borrowed from jet fighters and space rockets, writes Bayley, former director of the Design Museum, and internationally known design critic and writer.
 The four volumes, $24.95 each, are available in bookstores or by calling Parkwest Publications at 201-432-3257.
 -0- 4/28/93
 /NOTE TO EDITORS: Review copies available/
 /CONTACT: Brian Squire of Parkwest Publications, 201-432-3257, or fax, 201-432-3708/


CO: Parkwest Publications, Inc. ST: IN: PUB SU: PDT

GK-WB -- NYFNS1 -- 1669 04/28/93 07:31 EDT
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Date:Apr 28, 1993
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