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RECORDS OF TEXAS MAMMALS HOUSED IN THE ANGELO STATE NATURAL HISTORY COLLECTIONS, ANGELO STATE UNIVERSITY.

Marcia A. Revelez [*]

Abstract.--County records are presented for mammals in Texas from the Angelo State Natural History Collections of Angelo State University. Seventy-nine records representing 35 species of mammals and 38 counties in Texas are reported. Records for Ammospermophilus interpres, Geomys texensis and Vulpes vulpes represent range extensions.

The systematic collections of vertebrates and plants at Angelo State University, now known as the Angelo State Natural History Collections (ASNHC), were initiated in the mid-1960's by members of the Department of Biology. The Collection of Mammals was begun by Drs. Wilmot A. Thornton and Gordon C. Creel, biologists who also contributed to the knowledge of mammalian distribution and systematics in west Texas (Thornton et al. 1971; Thornton & Creel 1975a; 1975b). Over the next three decades, the collection of mammals grew under the direction of W. A. Thornton, Mark D. Engstrom and Robert C. Dowler to its current size of more than 11,000 specimens. Unfortunately, because of the university's size and location, many studies of Texas mammals failed to include reference to specimens at the ASNHC.

A search of the Collection of Mammals at the ASNHC has resulted in 79 unreported county records representing 35 species from Texas. The species accounts reported herein represent new records from all ten of the major ecological regions: Pineywoods, Coastal Prairies and Marshes, Post Oak Savannah, Blackland Prairies, Cross Timbers and Prairies, South Texas Plains, Edwards Plateau, Rolling Plains, High Plains, and Trans-Pecos Mountains and Basins (Davis & Schmidly 1994). The currently recognized distribution in Texas and a brief description of the geographic region are summarized for each species. The specimens examined are arranged alphabetically by county. Taxonomy and order of the accounts follow Manning & Jones (1998). Sight records are verified for the porcupine, Erethizon dorsatum and for the coyote, Canis latrans reported by Goetze (1998), and for Taxidea taxus reported by Choate (1997). Range extensions are recognized for two rodents, Ammospermophilus interpres, Geomys texensis and the red fox, Vulpes vulpes.

SPECIES ACCOUNTS

Didelphis virginiana.--The distribution of the Virginia opossum includes the majority of Texas excluding a portion of the Trans-Pecos (Davis & Schmidly 1994). New records from the Rolling Plains are reported for Fisher and Glasscock counties. New records from the Edwards Plateau are reported for Coleman, Concho, Crockett, Schleicher and Sterling counties. A specimen labeled as occurring in Schleicher Co., 30.0 mi. W of Eldorado is actually from Crockett County.

Material examined.--Coleman Co., 1 mi. N, 1 mi. W of Valera (ASNHC 10195). Concho Co., 6.0 mi. NE of Paint Rock (ASNHC 10419). Crockett Co., 30 mi. W of Eldorado (ASNHC 9609). Fisher Co., 10 mi. W of Roby (ASNHC 5359). Glasscock Co., 16.1 mi. N, 0.5 mi. E of Garden City, Hwy 80 (ASNHC 10621). Schleicher Co., 10.0 mi. N, 4.0 mi. E of Eldorado (ASNHC 10420). Sterling Co., 16 mi. NW of Sterling City (ASNHC 8683).

Cryptotis parva.--The least shrew occurs in the eastern and central portions of the state, ranging west in the Panhandle to the New Mexico line, and to Val Verde County along the Rio Grande (Davis & Schmidly 1994). On the Edwards Plateau region, Goetze (1998) reported this species as an unverified occurrence, resulting from lack of museum specimens, unsuitable climatic and edaphic conditions. Dowler & Boyd (1996) reported a record for this species in Tom Green County, extending the range for this species to just north of the Edwards Plateau region. They also noted that a specimen from 3.5 mi. NE of Eden, Concho County, listed as C. parva in the catalog of the Strecker Museum, Baylor University, was missing and presumably lost. On 5 October 1997 a specimen of C. parva from Eden in Concho County was salvaged from a cat, representing the only documented specimen from the Edwards Plateau region.

Material examined.--Concho Co., Eden (ASNHC 11116).

Myotis velifer.--The cave myotis occurs throughout most of western Texas including south Texas, eastern portions of the Panhandle, and north-central Texas (Davis & Schmidly 1994). The species is a colonial, year-round resident in the High Plains, Rolling Plains, Trans-Pecos and Edwards Plateau; it is also found in the South Texas Plains during the summer (Schmidly 1991; Choate 1997). Three males were collected on 26 March 1986 from Knox County on the Rolling Plains. One female was collected on 2 August 1998 from Schleicher County in the Edwards Plateau.

Material examined.--Knox Co., 10 mi. W of Vera (ASNHC 42974299). Schleicher Co., 2 mi. SW of Eldorado (ASNHC 11117).

Lasiurus cinereus.--The distribution of the hoary bat is broad but represented by scattered records (Davis & Schmidly 1994). It has a fall-spring migratory pattern but has been reported in Texas during the winter (Schmidly 1991). A single female was collected from Midland County in early December 1982, representing a record from the southern High Plains region of Texas. Another female was collected in mid-April 1994 from Calhoun County and is one of only a few records for this species from the coastal prairies and marshes of eastern Texas, where it is considered uncommon (Schmidly 1983).

Material examined.--Calhoun Co., 1.3 mi. S, 14.6 mi. W of Port Lavaca, Guadalupe Delta Wildlife Management Area (ASNHC 10624). Midland Co., Midland (ASNHC 5361).

Nycticeius humeralis.--The evening bat occurs in the eastern one-third of the state where it is considered a species of forested areas, especially along rivers (Schmidly 1991). Recent records have extended its distribution west to include Tom Green County (Dowler et al. 1992; Boyd et al. 1997) and Val Verde and Presidio counties (Dowler et al. 1999). The evening bat has been collected during all times of the year suggesting that it is a year-round resident despite its migratory nature (Schmidly 1991). Two females were collected on 8 January 1993 in Starr County near the Rio Grande from the South Texas Plains region.

Material examined.--Starr Co., 2.2 mi. N, 3.5 mi. W of Salineno (ASNHC 8690, 8691).

Tadarida brasiliensis.--The Brazilian free-tailed bat is a colonial, migratory species having a statewide distribution during the summer. This species is known to reach its greatest concentration in the Edwards Plateau region of Texas (Schmidly 1991). Two individuals were collected on 3 April 1969 from McCulloch County. Two specimens from Runnels County on the Rolling Plains are also records.

Material examined.--McCulloch Co., 5 mi. W of Brady (ASNHC 651, 1235). Runnels Co., Crews (ASNHC 10625); Winters (ASNHC 8692).

Dasypus novemcinctus.--The nine-banded armadillo has a widespread distribution throughout Texas with the exception of the Trans-Pecos region where water availability appears to be a limiting factor (Davis & Schmidly 1994). New records are reported for the Edwards Plateau from Coleman, Concho and Upton counties. Specimens collected from Concho County were taken from areas in both the Edwards Plateau and Rolling Plains regions. In eastern Texas, new records are reported for Grayson County in the Blackland Prairies region, Robertson County in the Post Oak Savannah region, and Trinity County in the Pineywoods.

Material examined.--Coleman Co., 2.0 mi. S of Novice (ASNHC 10965). Concho Co., 10 1/4 mi. W of Paint Rock (ASNHC 10968); 4.2 mi. N, 8.5 mi. E of Eden (ASNHC 8684). Grayson Co., 2.2 mi. N, 2.0 mi. W of Sherman (ASNHC 5651). Robertson Co., 1.0 mi. S, 2 3/4 mi. W of Wheelock (ASNHC 10966). Trinity Co., 4.3 mi. S, 6.0 mi. E of Apple Springs, Alabama Creek Wildlife Management Area (ASNHC 10622, 10623). Upton Co., 3 mi. S, 4 mi. W of Rankin, Hwy 67 (ASNHC 9694).

Sylvilagus aquaticus.--The swamp rabbit is distributed over the eastern third of the state (Davis & Schmidly 1994). They are considered more common than any other rabbit (Schmidly 1983) in the Pineywoods. A new record is reported for this region from the Alabama Creek Wildlife Management Area in Trinity County.

Material examined.--Trinity Co., 4.3 mi. S, 6.0 mi. E of Apple Springs, Alabama Creek Wildlife Management Area, 31[degrees]10.2'N, 94[degrees]52.8'W (ASNHC 10649).

Sylvilagus Floridanus.--The eastern cottontail is known throughout the state (Davis & Schmidly 1994). New records are reported from the Rolling Plains region for Concho and Fisher counties. A new record is reported for Trinity County in the pine-oak forest portion of the Pineywoods, and for Goliad County in the South Texas Plains region.

Material examined.--Concho Co., 4.5 mi. S, 11.0 mi. W of Paint Rock (ASNHC 10646). Fisher Co., 1.5 mi. W of Hobbs (ASNHC 5634); 1.0 mi. W of Hobbs (ASNHC 5635, 5636). Goliad Co., 1.0 mi. E of Berclair (ASNHC 656). Trinity Co., 3.0 mi. S, 1.5 mi. E of Apple Springs, Alabama Creek Wildlife Management Area (ASNHC 10648).

Lepus californicus.--This species ranges throughout most of the state, excluding the Big Thicket region of southeastern Texas (Davis & Schmidly 1994). Four individuals collected from Scurry County represent new records for the High Plains.

Material examined.--Scurry Co., 15 mi. E of Snyder (ASNHC 5381, 5632, 5633, 7904).

Ammospermophilus interpres.--The antelope ground squirrel is known in Texas only from areas of the Trans-Pecos southwest of Crane, Reagan, Crockett and Val Verde counties (Davis & Schmidly 1994). A specimen collected in 1971 has a locality written as Gaines Co., 22.0 mi. SW of Lamesa, which is actually in Andrews County. Upon making contact with a participant in that field study, it was discovered that the locality written was an approximation and the specimen was in fact collected from Gaines County but from 10.5 mi. S, 14.7 mi. W of Lamesa, near the county line between Gaines and Dawson counties (B. Archer pers. comm.). Choate (1997) reported A. interpres as a species of possible or questionable occurrence, having a distributional limit near the Liano Estacado in Crane and Reagan counties. This area represents a northern range extension for this species into the Liano Estacado region of the state.

Material examined.--Gaines Co., 22 mi. SW of Lamesa = 10.5 mi. S, 14.7 mi. W of Lamesa (ASNHC 678).

Sciurus carolinensis.-The distribution of this species ranges over the eastern one-third of the state; however, it has been introduced into other parts of the state (Davis & Schmidly 1994). A male was collected from Sabine County representing a new record from the Pineywood region of east Texas.

Material examined.--Sabine Co., 14 mi. SE of Hemphill, FM 2928 (ASNHC 699).

Geomys texensis.--The distribution of the Llano pocket gopher is patchy, known only to occur in two isolated areas of the Edwards Plateau (Davis & Schmidly 1994). A population was discovered in Coleman County near the Freese Dam, Lake O. H. Ivie, just north of the Concho county line. This population is isolated and occurs in deep sandy soils. Karyotyped individuals from this population had a 2N = 70 and an FN = 68 (Revelez 1999). A total of six individuals have been collected representing the first record of this species north of the Colorado River, thereby extending the range for this species on the Edwards Plateau.

Material examined.--Coleman Co., 20.0 mi. S, 14.0 mi. E of Coleman (ASNHC 10629-10631, 10635-10637).

Perognathus merriami.--Merriam's pocket mouse is known from the western two-thirds of the state (Davis & Schmidly 1994). New records from Coleman County are reported at an area at the juncture of the Edwards Plateau and Rolling Plains regions of Texas.

Material examined.--Coleman Co., 1 mi. N, 1 mi. W of Valera (ASNHC 10133, 10638, 10639).

Castor canadensis.--The beaver can be found over most of the state in suitable habitats. This species is found throughout much of the Edwards Plateau region (Goetze 1998) and a new record is reported for Menard County.

Material examined.--Menard Co., 0.7 mi. N of Ft. McKavett (ASNHC 8786).

Reithrodontomys fulvescens.--The fulvous harvest mouse is found in the eastern two-thirds of the state and is reported as absent in the western Panhandle and central Edwards Plateau (Davis & Schmidly 1994). Goetze (1998) reported this species as occurring throughout the southern and eastern portions of the Edwards Plateau with only a single record from the northeastern portion in Callahan County. Specimens from Nolan and Real counties represent new records for this area of the Edwards Plateau. Specimens taken from Coleman County were collected in an area where the Edwards Plateau and Rolling Plains regions meet.

Material examined.--Coleman Co., 4.0 mi. N, 1.0 mi. W of Valera (ASNHC 10478); 4 mi. N of Valera (ASNHC 10136); 1 mi. N, 1 mi. W of Valera (ASNHC 10477). Nolan Co., NW of Blackwell (ASNHC 10642). Real Co., Camp Wood (ASNHC 10643).

Reithrodontomys montanus.--The range of the plains harvest mouse includes the western and central parts of the state (Davis and Schmidly 1994). Records verifying its distribution on the Edwards Plateau are scarce (Goetze 1998). New records are reported for Coleman and Sutton counties. The harvest mice collected from Coleman County were from an area at the junction of the Edwards Plateau and Rolling Plains regions.

Material examined.--Coleman Co., 1 mi. N, 1 mi. W of Valera (ASNHC 11160, 11161). Sutton Co., 11.0 mi. N of Sonora (ASNHC 11162).

Peromyscus attwateri.--The range of the Texas mouse includes most of the central portion of Texas and extends northward into the Panhandle and southward just beyond the Edwards Plateau (Davis & Schmidly 1994). Eight individuals were collected in Coleman County representing new records in an area where the Edwards Plateau and Rolling Plains regions meet.

Material examined.--Coleman Co., 4.0 mi. N, 3.0 mi. W of Valera (ASNHC 10368-10370, 10372, 10472, 10473, 10970); 1 mi. N, 1 mi. W of Valera (ASNHC 10371).

Peromyscus leucopus.--The white-footed mouse has a statewide distribution (Davis & Schmidly 1994). In east Texas, this mammal is considered extremely rare in the upland pine-oak forests of the north-central part of this region (Schmidly 1983). A male collected from Montgomery County on 21 March 1991 represents a new record for eastern Texas.

Material examined.-Montgomery Co., 8.6 mi. N, 1.1 mi. E of Montgomery (ASNHC 7827).

Peromyscus maniculatus.--The deer mouse is widespread but considered less common in the eastern, coastal and southern parts of the state (Davis & Schmidly 1994). Five additional records from Irion, Kinney and Real counties are also reported for the Edwards Plateau. The specimens collected from Coleman County were collected in an area where the Edwards Plateau and Rolling Plains meet. A new record is reported for Martin County on the Llano Estacado.

Material examined.--Coleman Co., 4.0 mi. N, 3.0 mi. W of Valera (ASNHC 10373, 10476); 1 mi. N, 1 mi. W of Valera (ASNHC 10374-10379, 10474). Irion Co., 3.9 mi. N, 1.5 mi. E of Mertzon (ASNHC 9424). Kinney Co., 18 mi. E of Del Rio, Hwy 90 (ASNHC 5582-5587). Martin Co., 2.4 mi. N, 12.2 mi. E of Grady (ASNHC 8084-8086); 4.2 mi. S, 1.6 mi. E of Grady (ASNHC 8090-8093); 2.8 mi. N, 5.2 mi. W of Stanton (ASNHC 8094, 8095). Real Co., Camp Wood (ASNHC 1064).

Peromyscus pectoralis.--The white-ankled mouse occurs in the TransPecos northeastward through the central portion of the state (Davis & Schmidly 1994). On the Edwards Plateau, this species is considered common with the exception of the extreme northwest (Goetze 1998). An individual collected from Coleman County represents a new record from an area that lies where Edwards Plateau and Rolling Plains regions meet.

Material examined.--Coleman Co., 4.5 mi. N, 3.0 mi. W of Valera (ASNHC 10475).

Baiomys taylori.--The northern pygmy mouse occurs over most of Texas excluding the Trans-Pecos and northeastern portions of the state (Davis & Schmidly 1994). A new record is reported for Coleman County at an area close to the junction of the Edwards Plateau and Rolling Plains regions.

Material examined.--Coleman Co., 1 mi. N, 1 mi. W of Valera (ASNHC 10137, 10640).

Sigmodon hispidus.--The hispid cotton rat is widespread in Texas, but records are spotty in the Panhandle and central regions of Texas (Davis & Schmidly 1994). A record is reported for Coleman County in an area where the Edwards Plateau and Rolling Plains regions meet.

Material examined.--Coleman Co., 4.0 mi. N, 3.0 mi. W of Valera (ASNHC 11114).

Erethizon dorsatum.--Porcupines occur in the western half of the state although records are scattered. On the Edwards Plateau, this species is reported as ranging throughout the western half of the region (Goetze 1993). New records are reported from Edwards and Nolan counties on the Edwards Plateau. A Sight record reported by Goetze (1998) is verified for Nolan County.

Material examined.--Edwards Co., no specific locality, Jimmy Holman Ranch (ASNHC 8827). Nolan Co., 3.0 mi. N, 6.0 mi. E of Blackwell, FM 263 (ASNHC 11159).

Canis latrans.--The coyote has a statewide distribution and has been well documented despite the fact that museum records are uncommon (Goetze 1998). New records are reported for Fisher and Mitchell counties in the Rolling Plains and for Callahan counties in the Cross Timbers and Prairies regions. Two Runnels County records are from a ranch in the southeastern portion of the county, and could be in either the Rolling Plains or Edwards Plateau regions. A sight record reported by Goetze (1998) is verified for Runnels County.

Material examined.--Callahan Co., 12 mi. N of Cross Plains (ASNHC 387-389). Fisher Co., 2 mi. S of Hobbs (ASNHC 5367); 10 mi. W Roby (ASNHC 8702). Mitchell Co., no specific locality, Wayne McCabe Ranch (ASNHC 386); no specific locality (ASNHC 435, 437, 465). Runnels Co., Spreen Ranch, SE portion of county (ASNHC 634-635).

Vulpes macrotis.--This study follows Manning & Jones (1998) in recognizing the species distinction between V. velox (swift fox) and V. macrotis (kit fox). Based on known records, the distribution of this species in Texas ranges westward into the Trans-Pecos region from Howard, Sterling, Irion and Crockett counties. Three skulls were found on the Clay Miller Ranch in Jeff Davis County in 1994.

Material examined.-Jeff Davis Co., 9 mi. W of Valentine, Clay Miller Ranch (ASNHC 8728-8730).

Vulpes vulpes.-The red fox is found throughout the eastern and central parts of Texas excluding western portions of the Trans-Pecos and Panhandle regions. It is absent from the southern portions of Texas south of the Edwards Plateau (Davis & Schmidly 1994). Two new records are reported for the Edwards Plateau from Sutton and Edwards counties. Although no specific locality was noted for the Edwards County specimen, this record represents an extension of the species' southern range.

Material examined.-Edwards Co., no specific locality (ASNHC 8731). Sutton Co., no specific locality, Frank Bond Ranch (ASNHC 8741, 8742).

Urocyon cinereoargenteus.-The gray fox is considered widespread throughout the state (Davis & Schmidly 1994). New records for the Rolling Plains include Concho, Glasscock and Mitchell counties. New records for the Edwards Plateau include Coleman and Schleicher counties. The individual collected from Coleman County was taken from an area on the edge of the Edwards Plateau and Rolling Plains regions. New records are also reported for Callahan and Lampasas counties from the Cross Timbers and Prairies region.

Material examined .-Callahan Co., 12 mi. N of Cross Plains (ASNHC 394). Coleman Co., 0.5 mi. S of Valera on FM 503 (ASNHC 8720). Concho Co., Paint Rock (ASNHC 10422). Glasscock Co., 4 mi. NE of Garden City (ASNHC 8721). Lampasas Co., 8.0 mi. S, 7.0 mi. W of Lometa (ASNHC 10626). Mitchell Co., no specific locality (ASNHC 411, 412, 455-473, 478-484). Schleicher Co., 13 mi. NE of Eldorado (ASNHC 8724); 5 mi. NE of Eldorado (ASNHC 8725).

Bassariscus astutus.--The ringtail occurs throughout Texas, but records are more common in the east-central portion of the state (Davis & Schmidly 1994). New records from the Edwards Plateau are reported for Concho and Schleicher counties. New records from the Rolling Plains are also reported for Concho and Mitchell counties, and for Live Oak County on the South Texas Plains.

Material examined.--Concho Co., 2 mi E of Paint Rock (ASNHC 11115); 11.0 mi. W, 4.5 mi. S of Paint Rock (ASNHC 10426). Live Oak Co., no specific locality (ASNHC 8761). Mitchell Co., no specific locality (ASNIHC 471). Schleicher Co., 10 mi. N, 4 mi. E of Eldorado (ASNHC 9639).

Procyon lotor.--Raccoons occur statewide but records are most common in east Texas (Davis & Schmidly 1994). A new record from Runnels County is reported for the Edwards Plateau. New records are also reported for Glasscock and Mitchell counties on the Rolling Plains.

Material examined.--Glasscock Co., 11 mi. N of Garden City (ASNHC 8767). Mitchell Co., no specific locality (ASNHC 467-470). Runnels Co., 5.2 mi. 5, 6.2 mi. E of Ballinger (ASNHC 8769, 9730).

Mustela frenata.--The long-tailed weasel has a statewide distribution excluding the northern portion of the Panhandle (Davis & Schmidly 1994). They are considered rare in the Trans-Pecos, with specimens reported from El Paso, Culberson, Brewster and Terrell counties. A male was salvaged as a road-killed specimen by Sam Crowe on 7 December 1992 and represents a new record for Pecos County.

Material examined.--Pecos Co., 5 mi. N of Fort Stockton (ASNHC 8757).

Taxidea taxus.--The range of the badger includes the majority of the state, excluding the easterumost portion. A new record is reported for Dawson County on the Llano Estacado, and Mitchell County on the Rolling Plains. A new record is also reported from Coleman County in an area that lies on the edge of the Edwards Plateau and Rolling Plains regions.

Material examined.--Coleman Co., 2.0 mi. E of Valera (ASNHC 10627). Dawson Co., no specific locality (ASNHC 9650). Mitchell Co., 10 mi. S of Colorado City (ASNHC 99).

Spilogale gracilis.--The distribution of the western spotted skunk includes the southwestern portion of the state as far north as Garza and Howard counties eastward to Bexar and Duval counties (Davis & Schmidly 1994). This distribution includes most of the Edwards Plateau; however, Goetze (1998) stated that specimens there are scarce. A female spotted skunk was collected on 11 July 1998 from Coke County, and another female was collected from Concho County on 14 October 1999. These specimens represent new records from the Rolling Plains along the eastern edge of this species' distribution.

Material examined.--Coke Co., 3/4 mi. N of Tennyson (ASNHC 10967). Concho Co., 10 1/4 mi. W of Paint Rock (ASNHC 10968).

Mephitis mephitis.--The range of the striped skunk is widespread in Texas (Davis & Schmidly 1994). A new record is reported for Callahan County in the Cross Timbers and Prairies region.

Material examined.--Callahan Co., 12 mi. N of Cross Plains (ASNHC 395).

Conepatus mesoleucus.--The distribution of the hog-nosed skunk includes most of the southwestern and central portions of Texas (Davis & Schmidly 1994). Goetze (1998) stated that on the Edwards Plateau, this species occurs at least as far north as Reagan and Nolan counties but may range throughout the entire region. New records are reported for Schleicher and Upton counties.

Material examined.--Schleicher Co., 0.5 mi. N, 15.8 mi. E of Eldorado (ASNHC 8753, 9635); 24.0 mi. E of Eldorado (ASNHC 10972). Upton Co., 4.6 mi. E of Rankin, Hwy 67 (ASNHC 9707).

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Because county records from this paper date back to 1969, it is important to thank the numerous field collectors who have helped build the ASNHC over the last 35 years. This would include Wilmot A. Thornton, Gordon C. Creel, Mark. D. Engstrom, Terry C. Maxwell and Ross C. Dawkins. Other colleagues who have assisted with fieldwork and other activities related to this project include Ann Maxwell, Barbara Archer, Sam Crowe, Zane Laws, Lynn Simpson, Thomas E. Lee, Ray Woodward, Scott Burt, Darin Carroll, Cody Edwards, Joel Brant, Brandy Martin, John Hanson, Spencer Stewart and students from several past mammalogy classes. Special appreciation is given to Brandy Martin, without whose help in cataloging and verifying specimen data, this project might never have come to completion. We would also like to thank Joel Brant, Dam Carroll, Larry Choate, Jim Goetze and Michelle Haynie for their comments on earlier drafts of this manuscript.

*Current Address: Department of Biological Sciences and Museum Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409

LITERATURE CITED

Boyd, R. A., R. C. Dowler & T. C. Maxwell. 1997. The mammals of Tom Green County, Texas. Occas. Papers Mus., Texas Tech Univ., 169:1-27.

Choate, L. L. 1997. The mammals of the Llano Estacado. Spec. Publ. Mus., Texas Tech Univ., 40:1-240.

Davis, W. B. & D. J. Schmidly. 1994. The mammals of Texas. Texas Parks and Wildlife Dept., Nongame and Urban Program, x +337 pp.

Dowler, R. C. & R. A. Boyd. 1996. A range extension for the least shrew (Cryptotis parva) in west-central Texas. Texas J. Sci., 48(2):168-180.

Dowler, R. C., R. C. Dawkins & T. C. Maxwell. 1999. Range extensions for the evening bat (Nycticeius humeralis) in west Texas. Texas J. Sci., 51(2):193-195.

Dowler, R. C., T. C. Maxwell & D. S. Marsh. 1992. Noteworthy records of bats from Texas. Texas J. Sci., 44(1):121-123.

Goetze, J. R. 1998. The mammals of the Edwards Plateau, Texas. Spec. Publ. Mus., Texas Tech Univ., 41:1-263.

Manning, R. W. & C. Jones. 1998. Annotated checklist of Recent land mammals of Texas, 1998. Occas. Papers Mus., Texas Tech Univ., 182:1-19.

Revelez, M. A. 1999. Distributional and systematic analysis of pocket gophers (genus Geomys) in west-central Texas. Unpublished Masters Thesis. Angelo State University, San Angelo, Texas, 46 pp.

Schmidly, D. J. 1983. Texas mammals east of the Balcones Fault Zone. Texas A&M University Press, xviii + 400 pp.

Schmidly, D. J. 1991. The bats of Texas. Texas A&M University Press, xvii +188 pp.

Thornton W. A. & G. C. Creel. 1975a. Distribution of gophers (Geomyidae) in western Texas. Southwestern Nat., 20(2):272-275.

Thornton W. A. & G. C. Creel. 1975b. The taxonomic status of the kit foxes. Texas J. Sci., 26(1&2):127-136.

Thornton, W. A., G. C. Creel & R. E. Trimble. 1971. Hybridization in the fox genus Vulpes in west Texas. Southwestern Nat., 15(4):473-484.
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Author:Revelez, Marcia A.; Dowler, Robert C.
Publication:The Texas Journal of Science
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Aug 1, 2001
Words:4351
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