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RECESSION THREATENS ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUP EFFORTS; ENVIRONMENTAL BUSINESS EXECUTIVES GATHER TO SHARE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS

 RECESSION THREATENS ENVIRONMENTAL CLEANUP EFFORTS; ENVIRONMENTAL
 BUSINESS EXECUTIVES GATHER TO SHARE STRATEGIES FOR SUCCESS
 BOSTON, March 19 /PRNewswire/ -- "The environment is one of the hidden casualties of the recession," says Richard Golob, president of the Cambridge, Mass.-based World Information Systems and publisher of the weekly Hazardous Materials Intelligence Report. "Just as social services have suffered reductions as money has become scarcer, federal and state environmental cleanup projects are also in jeopardy. Consider the Superfund program -- the federal legislation requires corporations that are responsible for hazardous waste problems to pay for the remediation work. But if they're experiencing cash problems, instead of paying their share of the cleanup, they may decide to fight a court battle that lasts long enough for the recession to end and their balance sheets to improve. Or, they may just study the problem until they can afford to do the cleanup."
 Golob also notes that, as government agencies have suffered budget cuts, they have not been able to fund the levels of enforcement activity needed to maintain their past progress in environmental cleanup. "Once it becomes obvious that government has reduced its enforcement efforts, there's a greater likelihood that fewer companies will proactively comply with the law -- they'll simply wait until the government identifies them and only then take compliance action."
 How will all this affect the environmental service industry, one of the fastest growing segments of the U.S. economy? According to Golob, environmental service companies used to think that they were immune from swings in the economy. Now, many of these companies are struggling with the same types of operational constraints and revenue shortages that firms in other industries have been facing. Environmental service firms are finding themselves with fewer clients and less work, as their potential clients are deferring their environmental cleanup obligations. As a result, environmental service companies must cut costs and fight for more market share if they are to survive and grow.
 Survival and growth during the recession are the main themes of Environmental Business '92, which Golob and his company sponsor and organize. "The conference is designed to help senior executives in the environmental industry learn strategies and techniques for fighting the recession," says Golob, who serves as conference chairman. "The goal is to provide a forum for environmental business executives to pool their experience so that each company does not have to reinvent the wheel. Through presentations by leading environmental business executives and consultants, we provide conference participants with the information they need to succeed in the current economic climate."
 A key presentation at Environmental Business '92 will be the "State of the Industry Report." The report reveals which environmental business sectors are likely to be hit the hardest by the shrinking market for environmental services. Other sessions offer strategies for increasing market share during the economic slowdown and projections about how the recession is affecting different regions and industries that purchase environmental services.
 Now, in its fourth year, the Environmental Business Conference series has more than 2,000 alumni. The conference offers the nation's only curriculum devoted solely to enhancing the skills and knowledge base of environmental business executives. In addition to focusing on the recession, this year's conference, which will be held on March 23 and 24 at the Boston Park Plaza in Boston, covers all aspects of running an environmental business, from sales and marketing to financial management and human resources.
 Says Golob, "By helping environmental service companies become more profitable, despite the economy, we believe that we can help maintain the quality of the environment during these difficult economic times. And that's a critical goal -- we simply cannot afford to lose any of the forward momentum that we've gained during the past decade of environmental progress."
 -0- 3/19/92
 /CONTACT: Richard Golob, president of World Information Systems, 617-491-5100/ CO: World Information Systems ST: Massachusetts IN: SU:


EG-TM -- NE005 -- 9623 03/19/92 11:17 EST
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Mar 19, 1992
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