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RECEPTAGEN SPONSORS AIDS-LYMPHOMA DRUG RESEARCH AT UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA

 SEATTLE, Wash., Aug. 18 /PRNewswire/ -- Receptagen Corp. (formerly, VitaMed Inc.), a Seattle-based biotechnology company and a subsidiary of the public Canadian company Receptagen Ltd. (Alberta: RCG), today announced that it signed a multi-year research agreement with The Biomedical Research Centre (BRC), located at the University of British Columbia, to develop antibody-based "growth blocker" drugs to treat AIDS- related lymphoma (ARL).
 Under the agreement, Receptagen Corp. will be entitled to exclusive licensing rights to any compound based on its concepts and developed from the collaboration, according to A. Charles Morgan, Ph.D., president and chief technical officer of Receptagen Corp. Financial details were not disclosed.
 "We are excited about being part of the expanding research network of Receptagen, with the potential to create a new generation of anti- proliferative drugs that may lack the toxicities of existing chemotherapies," said John Schrader, Ph.D., member of the BRC.
 Morgan said, "This represents continuing progress in establishing a cost effective research capability without high fixed costs. The agreement is the first with a Canadian institution. BRC researchers will be working closely with Receptagen scientists and collaborators at the University of Washington."
 The BRC is internationally recognized and focuses on genes and proteins that control the growth and differentiation of immune system cells. Occupying a $10 million facility on the campus of the University of British Columbia, the BRC is linked to the University Hospital and has an annual budget of $5 million.
 Growth Blockers
 Receptagen is engaged in the business of developing drugs aimed at regulating the uptake of vitamin-B12 as a means of blocking uncontrolled cell growth in ARL and other diseases. A rapidly spreading and highly malignant cancer of the lymph system in AIDS patients, ARL is project to be the most prevalent form of cancer within the next decade.
 Researchers at the BRC will be working to develop antibodies to a recombinant version of a protein important in vitamin-B12 uptake as a means to inhibit proliferation. Such antibodies will be genetically engineered to create "humanized" or fully human products for clinical trials.
 Prior studies have shown tumor cells die when deprived of vitamin- B12, but normal cells remain alive and may be "rescued" by supplying vitamin-B12. Lacking the typical side effects of chemotherapy, growth blockers may be well-suited for the treatment of cancers in AIDS patients and others with weakened immune systems.
 Founded in 1992, Receptagen Corp. is engaged in developing proprietary growth-blocker drugs for the treatment of cancer and other life-threatening diseases marked but uncontrolled cell proliferation.
 -0- 8/18/93
 /CONTACT: In the United States: Warren Wheeler, vice president, Business Development, and chief financial officer of Receptagen, 206-778-5260; or Charles Versaggi of Gable/Versaggi BioCommunications, 408-358-4162, for Receptagen; or, in Canada, Doug Ford or Gail Thurston of Enterprise Development, 604-685-0114/
 (RCG)


CO: Receptagen Corp.; Receptagen Ltd. ST: Washington, British Columbia IN: MTC SU:

TM-LH -- SJ001 -- 8550 08/18/93 08:30 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Aug 18, 1993
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