Printer Friendly

REALISTIC TESTING NEEDED FOR LANDFILL LINERS

 REALISTIC TESTING NEEDED FOR LANDFILL LINERS
 PITTSBURGH, Oct. 5, /PRNewswire/ -- Keeping landfilled waste from


escaping into surrounding soil and air is a major concern for industries, governments and citizens. Today, landfills are typically lined with several layers of synthetic and natural materials to prevent waste, gases and liquids from escaping.
 Landfill liners have to be strong enough to withstand punctures and flexible enough to conform to rocky surfaces and hills. Chemicals can eat away at liners. Cold weather and snow can cause liners to become hard and crack. The weight of the waste in the landfill can cause tears, punctures and leaks. The constant activity of heavy equipment and machinery on the surface of the landfill adds more stress.
 Finding a durable material that will hold up to all of these conditions, over a long period of time, is the focus of much research in the waste management field. Some researchers feel flexible membrane liners (FMLs) are the answer. FMLs are increasingly being specified for landfill liners because the thick, tough material FMLs are made from is known for its extreme impermeability.
 The most popular FML is a high-density polyethylene, a type of plastic. However, further testing is needed to prove that FMLs will continue to hold up over the lifetime expected of them, which could be 100 years.
 New ways of testing FMLs are discussed in an article published in the September 1992 issue of the Journal of the Air & Waste Management Association. The authors, Richard Ian Stessel and Paul Goldsmith of the University of South Florida, believe the long service life expected for these liners requires testing that includes field conditions.
 All landfill liners undergo traditional material strength tests, such as hardness, density and resistance to tears, punctures and fluid pressure. FMLs are used in hazardous waste landfills so tests must include resistance to hazardous chemicals. Chemicals should be applied while a sample is under strain, as well as in an un-deformed state.
 The authors conclude that use must be made of more advanced, but commonly available, laboratory techniques in testing membrane liners. Such techniques can test liner movement, or creeping, when they are laid over a hill, up to what point liners can resist stress and at what point liners fail. Basically, testing of the physical characteristics must better reflect the conditions to which the liners are exposed. This would help forecast the lifespan of liners.
 As waste management becomes more complex, the authors think FMLs will have broader applications. They feel that no other material can provide the degree of impermeability to the range of liquids found in waste, over acres of surface, while retaining the necessary flexibility. Additional uses for the materials include sanitary landfills, landfills containing ash from the combustion of solid waste, underlayment of treatment facilities and other installations dealing with hazardous waste, such as drum storage areas and lagoons.
 The Air & Waste Management Association provides a neutral forum where environmental professionals share technical and managerial information about air pollution control and waste management. This world-wide network of more than 13,000 members represents all disciplines and provides all viewpoints of environmental issues.
 -0- 10/5/92
 /CONTACT: Martha Swiss of Air & Waste Management Association, 412-232-3444, ext. 126/ CO: Air & Waste Management Association ST: Pennsylvania IN: SU:


CD-MA -- PGFNS1 -- 6365 10/05/92 07:33 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1992 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Oct 5, 1992
Words:553
Previous Article:STUDY REVEALS WHY CITIES FAIL TO ATTRACT NEW JOBS PLUS ASSETS ESSENTIAL TO KEEP THEM
Next Article:CRAY Y-MP C90 SYSTEM INSTALLED, ACCEPTED AT LIVERMORE
Topics:


Related Articles
TRAIL RIDGE LANDFILL NEAR THE START OF CONSTRUCTION
CHAMBERS OPENS NEW AREA AT MONROEVILLE, PA., LANDFILL
CHAMBERS OPENS NEW AREA AT MONROEVILLE, PA., LANDFILL
CHAMBERS DEVELOPMENT COMPANY ANNOUNCES COURT ACTION
CHAMBERS SIGNS CONTRACT FOR NEW FLORIDA LANDFILL
CHAMBERS RECEIVES PERMIT FOR NEW OHIO LANDFILL
CHAMBERS OPENS NEW LANDFILL IN VIRGINIA
AMCOL'S CETCO ENVIRONMENTAL UNIT ACQUIRES CLAYMAX CORP.
Craighead County landfill undergoes $1m expansion. (NE Journal).

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters