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RADIOLOGIC TECHNOLOGISTS AND RADIATION THERAPY TECHNOLOGISTS: DEMAND IS EXCEEDING SUPPLY

 RESTON, Va., July 7 /PRNewswire/ -- The future looks promising for those seeking careers in radiologic technology and radiation therapy technology.
 The most critical need is for radiation therapy technologists (17 percent vacancies) and nuclear medicine technologists (10 percent vacancies). Radiographers, sonographers and others also are in high demand.
 According to the United States Labor Department, by the year 2000 there will be a 65 percent increase in the need for these professionals.
 Radiologic technologists use x-rays and other forms of energy to produce radiological images. They are the professionals who take the chest x-ray film (radiographers) or perform a sonogram (sonographer) on the expectant mother. They also perform a variety of other diagnostic tests including MRI scans (MRI technologist) and CT (CT technologist) scans.
 Some technologists assist in the treatment of patients. The radiation therapy technologist assists the radiation oncologist in treating cancer patients. The special procedures technologist might assist radiologists in performing procedures to open blocked blood vessels.
 A person interested in becoming a technologist needs a high school diploma then needs to complete a two-to-four year educational program. Most employers require certification by the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. Other certification or state licensure also may be required.
 Radiologic technologists work in hospitals, private businesses, large corporations, and research centers. Hours are flexible; pay depends on the technologist's education, training and experience.
 For more information about becoming a radiologic technologist or radiation therapy technologist, sonographer or nuclear medicine technologist, contact the American College of Radiology, Department of Communications, 1891 Preston White Drive, Reston, Va. 22091, or the American Society of Radiologic Technologists, Department of Marketing and Public Relations, 15000 Central Ave. S.E., Albuquerque, N.M. 87123-3909.
 -0- 7/7/93
 /CONTACT: Keri J. Sperry, 703-648-8912, or Jill S. Van Balen, 703-648-8928, both of the American College of Radiology/


CO: American College of Radiology ST: Virginia IN: HEA SU: PER

LV -- NYCFNS2 -- 8873 07/07/93 06:47 EDT
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Date:Jul 7, 1993
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