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RADAR SENSOR FLIES ON DRONE.

Byline: Daily News

EDWARDS AIR FORCE BASE - The U.S. Air Force's Global Hawk unmanned reconnaissance plane made its first flight carrying a new sensor that can detect and identify radar and other types of electronic devices.

Global Hawk and the new sensor, known as the High Band System Production Configuration Unit, are designed and produced by Northrop Grumman Corporation.

The sensor is part of the Airborne Signals Intelligence Payload that is expected to be ready for use in 2008.

It will be integrated with the Air Force's Distributed Common Ground Stations, which are used to analyze electronic intelligence gathered by various airborne systems.

Global Hawk pilots itself by computer at an altitude of at least 60,000 feet, well above storms, for more than 35 hours. During a single mission, it can travel more than 11,500 nautical miles and scan an area and it provides detailed image-based intelligence on 40,000 square miles, an area bigger than Indiana.

Global Hawks have flown more than 5,000 combat hours in more than 230 missions over Iraq and Afghanistan.

Northrop Grumman's Integrated Systems and Mission Systems sectors developed and integrated the new sensor with the Global Hawk plane, which is produced in Palmdale.

The development effort, which will include additional flight tests, will be completed by the end of the year.

``Flying the high-band sensor system completes a critical technology development and demonstration milestone, advancing Northrop Grumman's integrated effort to field the next-generation ASIP system,'' said Dan Allen, vice president and general manager of the Mission System sector's Intelligence Systems division.

Global Hawk pilots itself by computer at an altitude of at least 60,000 feet, well above storms, for more than 35 hours. During a single mission, it can travel more than 11,500 nautical miles and scan an area and it provides detailed image-based intelligence on 40,000 square miles, an area bigger than Indiana.

Global Hawks have flown more than 5,000 combat hours in more than 230 missions over Iraq and Afghanistan.
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Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jan 17, 2006
Words:336
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