Printer Friendly

Punk powerhouses workin' on their night moves.

Byline: LEWIS TAYLOR The Register-Guard

"Poor and Weird" is the title of the first single off the Briefs' most recent album, the 2000 release "Hit After Hit."

The tune, a punk rock anthem that gets stuck in your head, almost could have been recorded in 1979. But like the other 13 tracks on this potent release, there is a little something extra.

"I'm poor and I'm weird, baby/ you got no time for me," the band chants, while drums beat and guitars swirl. "I'm poor and I'm weird/ I'm getting weirder by the second."

Named after their first gig, which lasted all of three songs, the Briefs promise a slightly longer set when they come to John Henry's today for a show with the Wristrockets, a local punk band, and Bettie Mayhem and the Disasters.

"Our sets last about 15 minutes now," guitarist Steve E. Nix said. "But we play 'em twice."

On "Hit After Hit," the Briefs blast their way though 13 highly concentrated punk songs in less than half an hour. They take on Bob Seger in the song "Silver Bullet" (`Kill Bob Seger right now') and Dolly Parton (`Dalai Lama/Dolly Parton'), and they get some new footwear on "New Shoes."

The CD struck enough sparks to grease a deal with Interscope Records. Now, the Briefs are hard at work on a follow-up album, due out this summer.

"People are waiting for this record to come out before they actually say anything," drummer Chris Brief said when asked what the fans thought of the band signing with Fred Durst's record label. "If it sucks, I'm sure we'll hear about it."

Brief said the new record would showcase a slightly different side of the Briefs, but he said there was no reason to fear a refocused band. The Briefs, he said, are still the Briefs.

The Briefs' brief stop in Eugene precedes a two-month national tour scheduled to coincide with the release of the new album. The band, which has been big in the Northwest and in California for some time, has been steadily building a following in the rest of the country (with the exception of at least one bar in Detroit, where the old time rock 'n' roll patrons didn't find much humor in the Briefs' sendup of Seger).

"We were kind of sketched out in Detroit," guitarist Daniel J. Travanti said. "We've got nothing against Bob Seger, though."

In case hyperactive, Ramones-era punk rock isn't enough, the Briefs dress in skinny retro ties and wrap-around shades. They even peg their pants and spike their peroxide-streaked hair.

No strangers to Eugene, the Briefs played the WOW Hall just last summer. And even when the group is just passing through, it always makes a point of stopping in the Willamette Valley.

"We're real big with the hippies," Nix said with a chortle. "We've also found a place in Eugene that has pretty good prices on Converses."

THE BRIEFS

WHAT: Punk rock

WHEN: 10 p.m. today

WHERE: John Henry's, 136 E. 11th Ave.

TICKETS: $5 at the door

ALSO: To hear music from the Briefs' latest album, call GuardLine at 485-2000 and select category 9942

CAPTION(S):

The Briefs will hold court tonight at John Henry's. THE BRIEFS WHAT: Punk rock WHEN: 10 p.m. today WHERE: John Henry's, 136 E. 11th Ave. TICKETS: $5 at the door ALSO: To hear music from the Briefs' latest album, call GuardLine at 485-2000 and select category 9942 Briefly
COPYRIGHT 2002 The Register Guard
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2002, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Entertainment
Publication:The Register-Guard (Eugene, OR)
Date:Feb 15, 2002
Words:579
Previous Article:Music Sideshow.
Next Article:Great Depression a gold mine for musicians.


Related Articles
Horizontal Action.
Club-hoppers have more choices this summer.
Music Sideshow.
Time In Malta.
Gold chains.
Pepper makes Hawaiian music you can't hula to.
BRIEFLY.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2021 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters