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Professors examine industrial transformation.

Zurich: Professors Elroy Dimson and Paul Marsh and Dr Mike Staunton of London Business School examine the industrial transformation that has taken place since 1900, alongside the parallel transition in markets as countries have moved from emerging to developed status.

They also assess the returns and risks from investing in equities, bonds, cash and currencies in 23 countries and three different regions. They also examine factor investing and the profitability of different investment styles. In a new study, they analyze the investment performance of nonfinancial assets such as housing, collectibles and precious metals.

Emerging markets were the stars of 2017, with a return of 38% vs 23% for developed markets. But over the last 118 years, they have underperformed developed markets by 1% per year. Since 1900, global equities have beaten bonds and bills, outperforming cash (Treasury bills) by 4.3% and bonds by 3.2% a year - a reward for the higher risk associated with investing in stocks

Since 1900, the average collectible rose 30-fold in terms of purchasing power - equivalent to an annualized price appreciation of 2.9% - but returned less than stocks globally.

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Publication:Daily the Pak Banker (Lahore, Pakistan)
Date:Feb 27, 2018
Words:186
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