Printer Friendly

Problems with the Fraser report Chapter 1: pitfalls in BMI time trend analysis/Les problemes avec le premier chapitre du rapport Fraser : ecueils dans l'analyse des tendances temporelles de l'IMC.

A recent report released by the Fraser Institute, "Obesity in Canada: Overstated Problems, Misguided Policy Solutions" makes numerous wide-reaching and controversial claims about the state of obesity in Canada. (1) In the first chapter of the report, analyses of national survey data from Statistics Canada are used to unequivocally conclude a lack of 'negative or disconcerting trend' in obesity and overweight. This conclusion is both surprising and intriguing as it goes against the scientific literature on Canadian weight trends. (2-5)

Closer examination, however, reveals a dismayingly large number of serious flaws in both the methods of analysis and scientific reasoning. This kind of quantitative but faulty analysis is misleading to readers who are not well versed in statistical methodology. The current commentary thus briefly examines three major issues in the Fraser report's analysis of Canadian BMI prevalence time trends. It is hoped that it will serve as a tutorial on some pitfalls of BMI time trend analysis, and will help guide health professionals in evaluating analyses such as those in the report.

Revisiting the prevalence trend in overweight and obesity

Figure 1 in the Fraser report shows the prevalence of overweight and obesity in Canadian adults of both sexes, estimated from self-report BMI from cycles 2003 to 2012 of the Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS). These data are shown by the solid black circles in Figure 1 of this commentary. The mutual overlap in confidence intervals of prevalence estimates from 2008 to 2012 leads the authors of the report to conclude that there is "no statistically significant difference between the rates in 2008 and 2012", providing proof presumably of the overall conclusion that weight trends are "stable or stabilizing" and that no "negative or disconcerting trend" exists. (1)

This seemingly innocuous analysis is beset with serious errors. First, confidence interval overlap is an incorrect procedure for statistical comparison and can lead to false conclusions. (6) For example, application of a two-sample z-test indicates a statistically significant (p[approximately equal to]0.01) difference between 2008 and 2012 prevalence estimates in spite of their overlapping confidence intervals.

Second, in 'spotting' regions of statistically similar prevalence, the authors have effectively performed multiple comparisons between all combinations of pairs of data values. While the confidence level ([alpha]) of a single pairwise comparison (correctly performed) is 95%, the a for multiple comparisons depends on the number of data points in the time series, their variances, as well as the number of points in the region of interest and its likely post hoc selection. The finding of no pairwise differences over the period 2008-2012 is thus associated with an unknown level of statistical significance.

[FIGURE 1 OMITTED]

Third, the frequency of pairwise statistical differences in prevalence is sensitive to temporal changes in survey sample size. As can be seen from Figure 1, the confidence intervals for the later years (2007-2012) are wider on average by a factor of [approximately equal to]1.6. This reflects the smaller sample sizes ([approximately equal to]55,000 adults) of the half-cycle CCHS estimates that were used over this period as compared with sample sizes ([approximately equal to]116,000 adults) of the full cycles of 2003 and 2005. As a result, there is an ipso facto increase in the likelihood of statistically similar estimates in this later time period that reflects a temporal change in sample size rather than a stabilization phenomenon. To demonstrate this, points in gray have been added to Figure 1 that represent the prevalence estimates from the full CCHS survey cycles 2007-2008, 2009-2010 and 2011-2012. Two sample z-tests show that once the sample sizes of all estimates are standardized, prevalence of overweight and obesity is seen to increase by a statistically significant amount every 4 years over the entire range from 2003 to 2012.

Fourth, the spacing of the two-year time intervals from 2003 to 2007 in all prevalence time trend plots of the Fraser Report, including Figure 1, were made equal to those of the one-year time intervals from 2007 to 2012, effectively compressing the x-axis between the years 2003 to 2007 and creating the visual illusion that trends are flatter in recent vs. previous years. The x-axis in Figure 1 in the current commentary correctly represents the two-year spacing between CCHS cycles 2003, 2005 and 2007, permitting an unbiased depiction of trends.

Pairwise comparison is in general not a reliable method to assess trends in time series as long sequences of data points may be statistically similar due to variability in individual measurements, even in the presence of a strong trend. (7) Regression methods, in contrast, permit the statistically rigorous assessment of trend in all data points collectively, while accounting for their changing variance due to sample size. A straightforward linear regression fit to the original data using weights to account for the effect of the different sample sizes of the CCHS cycles results in a positive slope estimate of 0.37 that is statistically significant (p<2 x [10.sup.-6], [R.sup.2][approximately equal to]0.98), indicating a continually increasing linear trend in the data. The fitted line (the dotted line in the current Figure 1) demonstrates goodness of fit. This increasing trend is maintained when the recent (2008-2012) data alone are fitted, where regression analysis yields a statistically similar slope value of 0.34 (p<0.03, [R.sup.2][approximately equal to]0.8).

Temporal stability in overweight prevalence hides a continuous change in the BMI distribution

The prevalence of the overweight BMI category in Canadian adults has stayed approximately constant from 2003 to 2012. (8) These trends are presented, for sexes combined and separately, in Figures 2, 5 and 8 in the Fraser report as major arguments for the temporal stability of body weight in the Canadian population. This interpretation of overweight prevalence trends is both naive and misleading as stability in overweight prevalence is in fact a consequence of a sustained and disquieting temporal change in the overall population BMI distribution.

To demonstrate this, we extracted the mean and percentiles of the BMI distribution for Canadian adults (both sexes combined) from the same CCHS cycles. It can be seen from Figures 2a and 2b that the mean and median (or 50th percentile) population BMI have been increasing since 2003, indicating a sustained rightward shift of the BMI distribution of the population toward higher values. This shift in distribution extends throughout the overweight range of BMI values, as shown by Figures 2c-2e which show the 60th, 70th and 80th percentiles plotted against time.

The reason that prevalence of the overweight category has paradoxically remained stable throughout this period is that the BMI distribution is widening as well as shifting. This phenomenon is illustrated in Figure 3, which shows the smoothed BMI distribution functions, estimated from the percentiles, for 2003 (black) and 2012 (gray). BMI is represented on the x-axis, and the vertical dotted lines span the overweight category; the areas under the distribution functions within this range are equal to the proportion or prevalence of overweight individuals in the respective populations. It can be seen that the gain in population share of overweight individuals due to the rightward shift in distribution 'A' is offset by the widening of the distribution 'B' caused by the proportionate increase of obese individuals. Temporal stability in the prevalence of the overweight BMI category thus represents the continued redistribution of individuals away from the normal and into the obese categories of the BMI distribution.

[FIGURE 2 OMITTED]

Assessing the impact of BMI limitations on time trends

The inability of BMI to distinguish between fat and lean body mass is next described in the report, and this limitation is implied to refute mainstream analyses of BMI time trends, while supporting the conclusions of the chapter. Limitations exist for all health metrics, however, and they do not necessarily mean that a particular metric is unsuitable for an intended application. For example, due to its high correlation with direct measures of body fat percentage, (9) BMI is recommended for monitoring population-level time trends of risk prevalence due to elevated body fat. (9-12)

BMI-defined obesity has low sensitivity but high specificity (9,11) for elevated body fat, which results in underestimation of the at risk population. This is compounded by the substantial downward bias in self-report BMI, estimated to be [approximately equal to]7-8% in the 2008 CCHS for adults aged 18-74, (13) but whose magnitude is in general survey-specific. (14) The upward shift in adiposity observed within the obese BMI category (15) suggests further that estimates of the rate of temporal increase of the at-risk population may also be underestimated. Due to these principal limitations of BMI, CCHS obesity trends are thus a conservative representation of the growing levels of health risk due to weight gain in the Canadian population, which tends to further counter the conclusions of the chapter.

[FIGURE 3 OMITTED]

CONCLUSIONS

Three issues with regard to BMI time trend analysis drawn from Chapter 1 of the Fraser report (1) have been discussed:

1. Spotting regions of confidence interval overlap is a statistically flawed method of assessing trend; regression methods, which have an unambiguous statistical interpretation, account for temporal change in sample size and measure the behaviour of the data as a whole, are preferred.

2. Temporal stability in overweight (25[less than or equal to]BMI<30) prevalence is in fact a consequence of a sustained change in the overall population BMI distribution.

3. BMI is considered reliable for tracking population-level weight trends due to its high correlation with body fat percentage. Obesity prevalence estimated from BMI represents conservative underestimates of the population at risk due to elevated body fat.

The results and interpretation of BMI time trend analyses can be markedly different if these issues are not accounted for. In particular, many of the findings in Chapter 1 of the Fraser report are either refuted or substantially mitigated. There are indications that the rate of increase in obesity prevalence is lower than it has been in the past, and there has been an intriguing downward fluctuation in the estimated 2012 prevalence for Canadian men. However, the existing data, under a more balanced and rigorous analysis, do not exhibit the unequivocal lack of 'disconcerting or negative trend', as claimed. More generally, it is hoped that this commentary will help guide public health professionals who need to interpret, or wish to perform their own, time trend analyses of BMI.

REFERENCES

(1.) Esmail N, Basham P. Obesity in Canada: Overstated Problems, Misguided Policy Solutions. Fraser Institute, 2014. (http://www.fraserinstitute.org)

(2.) Obesity in Canada. Ottawa, ON: Public Health Agency of Canada and the Canadian Institute for Health Information, 2011.

(3.) Gotay CC, Katzmarzyk PT, Janssen I, Dawson MY, Aminoltejari K, Bartley NL. Updating the Canadian obesity maps: An epidemic in progress. Can J Public Health 2012;104(1):e64-e68.

(4.) Ng M, Fleming T, Robinson M, Thomson B, Graetz N, Margono C, et al. Global, regional, and national prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adults during 1980-2013: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013. Lancet 2014;384(9945):766-81.

(5.) Twells L, Gregory D, Reddigan J, Midodzi WK. Current and predicted prevalence of obesity in Canada: A trend analysis. CMAJ OPEN 2014;2(1):E18.

(6.) Schenker N, Gentleman JF. On judging the significance of differences by examining the overlap between confidence intervals. Am Stat 2001;55(3):182-86.

(7.) Brockwell PJ, Davis RA. Introduction to Time Series and Forecasting, 2nd ed. New York, NY: Springer, 2002.

(8.) Statistics Canada. Overweight and Obese Adults (Self-Reported), 2011. Available at: http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-625-x/2012001/article/ 11664-eng.htm (Accessed November 1, 2014).

(9.) Romero-Corral A, Somers VK, Sierra-Johnson J, Thomas RJ, Collazo-Clavell ML, Korinek J, et al. Accuracy of body mass index in diagnosing obesity in the adult general population. Int J Obes (Lond) 2008;32(6):959-66.

(10.) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Body Mass Index: Considerations for Practitioners. 2014. Available at: http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/downloads/bmiforpactitioners.pdf (Accessed November 1, 2014).

(11.) Javed A, Jumean M, Murad MH, Okorodudu D, Kumar S, Somers VK, et al. Diagnostic performance of body mass index to identify obesity as defined by body adiposity in children and adolescents: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Pediatr Obes 2014;10. Article first published online : 24 JUN 2014, DOI: 10.1111/ijpo.242.

(12.) Townsend N. Obesity and Overweight Surveillance in England: What is measured and where are the gaps? Oxford, UK: National Obesity Observatory, 2009.

(13.) Shields M, Connor GS, Janssen I, Tremblay MS. Bias in self-reported estimates of obesity in Canadian health surveys: An update on correction equations for adults. Health Rep 2011;22(3):35-45.

(14.) Connor GS, Tremblay MS. The bias in self-reported obesity from 1976 to 2005: A Canada-US comparison. Obesity (Silver Spring) 2010;18(2):354-61.

(15.) Shields M, Tremblay MS, Connor GS, Janssen I. Measures of abdominal obesity within body mass index categories, 1981 and 2007-2009. Health Rep 2012;23(2):33-38.

Received: May 30, 2014 Accepted: October 13, 2014

Ernest Lo, PhD

Author's Affiliation

Institut national de sante publique du Quebec; Department of Epidemiology, Biostatistics and Occupational Health, McGill University, Montreal, QC Correspondence: Ernest Lo, Institut national de sante publique du Quebec, 190 blvd Cremazie Est, Montreal, QC H2P 1E2, Email: ernest.lo@inspq.qc.ca Acknowledgements: The author thanks Denis Hamel, Yun Jen, Patricia Lamontagne, Sylvie Martel and Colin Steensma for their comments on earlier versions of this commentary. Conflict of Interest: None to declare.

Editor's Note: At the author's request and expense, this article is being published in both English and French.

Un recent rapport publie par l'Institut Fraser, Obesity in Canada: Overstated Problems, Misguided Policy Solutions, fait de nombreuses allegations controversees qui ont de nombreuses implications au sujet de l'etat de l'obesite au Canada (1). Dans le premier chapitre du rapport, on analyse les donnees d'enquetes nationales de Statistique Canada pour conclure sans equivoque a l'absence d'une "tendance negative ou deconcertante" de l'obesite et de l'embonpoint. Cette conclusion etonne et intrigue a la fois, car elle s'oppose a la documentation scientifique sur les tendances ponderales canadiennes (2-5).

Un examen plus attentif revele cependant un nombre effarant de fautes graves a la fois dans les methodes d'analyse et dans le raisonnement scientifique du rapport. Ce genre d'analyse quantitative mais bancale est trompeuse pour les lecteurs qui ne sont pas familiers avec les methodes statistiques. Ce commentaire decrit donc brievement trois grands problemes de l'analyse que fait le rapport Fraser des tendances temporelles de prevalence de l'IMC au Canada. On espere qu'il servira de guide pour eviter certains ecueils de l'analyse des tendances temporelles de l'IMC et qu'il aidera les professionnels de la sante a mieux evaluer les analyses semblables a celle du rapport.

Retour sur la tendance de la prevalence de l'embonpoint et de l'obesite

La figure 1 du rapport Fraser illustre la prevalence de l'embonpoint et de l'obesite chez les adultes canadiens estimee a partir de donnees autodeclarees de l'IMC dans les cycles 2003 a 2012 de l'Enquete sur la sante dans les collectivites canadiennes (ESCC). Ces donnees sont representees par des points noirs dans la figure 1 du present commentaire. Le chevauchement mutuel des intervalles de confiance des estimations de la prevalence de 2008 a 2012 pousse les auteurs du rapport a conclure qu'il n'y a "aucun ecart significatif entre les taux de 2008 et de 2012", ce qui vient vraisemblablement etayer la conclusion generale selon laquelle les tendances ponderales sont "stables ou en cours de stabilisation" et qu'il n'existe "aucune tendance negative ou deconcertante" (traductions libres) (1).

Cette analyse en apparence inoffensive est parsemee d'erreurs graves. Premierement, le chevauchement des intervalles de confiance est une methode de comparaison statistique incorrecte qui peut mener a de fausses conclusions (6). Par exemple, l'application d'un test z pour deux echantillons montre un ecart statistiquement significatif (p[approximately equal to]0,01) entre les estimations de la prevalence en 2008 et 2012 et ce, malgre les intervalles de confiance qui se chevauchent.

[FIGURE 1 OMITTED]

Deuxiemement, en reperant les zones qui ont des prevalences statistiquement similaires, les auteurs font en fait des comparaisons multiples entre toutes les combinaisons de paires d'estimations. Alors que le niveau de confiance (a) d'une seule comparaison par paire (correctement effectuee) est de 95%, le veritable seuil des tests de comparaison multiples depend du nombre de points de donnees dans la serie chronologique, de leurs variances, ainsi que du nombre de points dans la zone d'interet et de sa probabilite de selection ulterieure. Le fait de ne trouver aucun ecart dans les comparaisons multiples sur la periode 2008-2012 est donc associe a un niveau de signification statistique inconnu.

Troisiemement, la frequence des differences significatives observees pour les comparaisons deux a deux est sensible aux changements de la taille de l'echantillon au fil du temps. Comme on peut le voir a la figure 1, les intervalles de confiance pour les dernieres annees (2007-2012) sont 60% plus larges en moyenne. Ceci s'explique par les plus petites tailles d'echantillons ([approximately equal to]55 000 adultes) des estimations a mi-cycle de l'ESCC utilisees au cours de cette periode comparativement aux tailles d'echantillons ([approximately equal to]116 000 adultes) des cycles complets de 2003 et 2005. En consequence, il y a une augmentation de la probabilite d'obtenir des estimations statistiquement similaires durant cette periode plus recente, qui s'explique par un changement temporel de la taille d'echantillon plutot que par un phenomene de stabilisation. Pour le demontrer, on a ajoute sur la figure 1 des points en gris qui representent les estimations de prevalence a partir des cycles complets de l'ESCC en 2007-2008, 2009-2010 et 2011-2012. Les comparaisons de deux echantillons par le test z montrent qu'une fois que l'on a standardise les tailles d'echantillons de toutes les estimations, les prevalences de l'embonpoint et de l'obesite ont augmente de facon significative tous les 4 ans sur l'ensemble de la periode de 2003 a 2012.

Quatriemement, l'espacement des intervalles de deux ans entre 2003 et 2007 pour tous les traces des tendances temporelles de prevalence du rapport Fraser, y compris la figure 1, a ete rendu egal a celui des intervalles d'un an entre 2007 et 2012, ce qui revient a comprimer l'axe des x entre les annees 2003 et 2007 et a creer l'illusion visuelle que les courbes s'aplanissent les dernieres annees par rapport aux annees anterieures. L'axe des x dans la figure 1 du present commentaire represente correctement l'espacement de deux ans entre les cycles 2003, 2005 et 2007 de l'ESCC, ce qui donne une representation non biaisee des tendances.

Les comparaisons multiples ne sont pas en general une methode fiable pour evaluer les tendances de series chronologiques, puisque de longues sequences de points de donnees peuvent etre statistiquement similaires en raison de la variabilite des mesures individuelles et ce, meme en presence d'une forte tendance (7). Les methodes de regression, par contre, permettent une evaluation statistiquement rigoureuse des tendances pour tous les points de donnees collectivement, tout en tenant compte de l'evolution de leur variance en raison de la taille de l'echantillon. Une simple regression lineaire ajustee aux donnees originales, a l'aide de ponderations pour tenir compte de l'effet des differentes tailles d'echantillons des cycles de l'ESCC, donne une pente positive dont la valeur estimee de 0,37 est significative (p<2 x [10.sup.-6], [R.sup.2][approximately equal to]0,98), ce qui indique une tendance lineaire en croissance constante dans les donnees. La ligne ajustee (en pointilles dans la figure 1 du present commentaire) montre que l'ajustement est bon. Cette tendance a la hausse demeure quand on ajuste seulement les donnees recentes (2008-2012), periode pour laquelle l'analyse de regression donne une pente d'une valeur statistiquement similaire de 0,34 (p<0,03, [R.sup.2][approximately equal to]0,8).

La stabilite temporelle de la prevalence de l'embonpoint cache un changement continu dans la distribution de l'IMC

La prevalence de la categorie de l'embonpoint de l'IMC chez les Canadiens adultes est restee a peu pres constante de 2003 a 2012 (8). Ces tendances sont presentees, pour les deux sexes combines et separes, dans les figures 2, 5 et 8 du rapport Fraser comme des arguments importants en faveur de la stabilite temporelle du poids dans la population canadienne. Cette interpretation des tendances de prevalence de l'embonpoint est a la fois naive et trompeuse, car la stabilite de la prevalence de l'embonpoint est en fait la consequence d'un changement temporel soutenu et inquietant dans la distribution de l'IMC dans la population generale.

[FIGURE 2 OMITTED]

Pour le demontrer, nous avons extrait la moyenne et les percentiles de la distribution de l'IMC pour les adultes canadiens (des deux sexes combines) de ces memes cycles de l'ESCC. On peut voir aux figures 2a et 2b que les IMC moyen et median (au 50e percentile) de la population augmentent depuis 2003, ce qui indique un deplacement soutenu de la distribution de l'IMC vers la droite (vers des valeurs plus elevees). Ce deplacement de la distribution s'etend sur l'ensemble des valeurs de l'IMC definissant l'embonpoint, comme on le voit aux figures 2c a 2e avec les 60e, 70e et 80e percentiles traces dans le temps.

La raison pour laquelle la categorie de prevalence de l'embonpoint est paradoxalement restee stable durant toute cette periode est que la distribution de l'IMC s'elargit en plus de se deplacer. Ce phenomene est illustre a la figure 3, qui montre les distributions lissees de l'IMC estimees a partir des percentiles, pour 2003 (en noir) et 2012 (en gris). L'IMC est represente sur l'axe des x, et les lignes pointillees verticales delimitent la categorie de l'embonpoint; les aires sous les courbes de distribution comprises dans cet intervalle sont egales a la proportion ou a la prevalence de personnes en embonpoint dans les populations respectives. On peut voir que l'augmentation de la part des personnes en embonpoint dans la population en raison du deplacement vers la droite de la distribution "A" est compensee par l'elargissement de la distribution "B" cause par l'augmentation proportionnelle des personnes obeses. La stabilite temporelle de la prevalence de la categorie d'IMC denotant un embonpoint represente ainsi la redistribution continue des personnes qui s'eloignent de la categorie du poids normal de la distribution de l'IMC pour entrer dans celle de l'obesite.

[FIGURE 3 OMITTED]

Evaluation de l'impact des limites de l'IMC sur les tendances temporelles

Le rapport Fraser explique ensuite l'incapacite de l'IMC a distinguer la masse maigre de la masse adipeuse. Les auteurs laissent alors sous-entendre que cette importante limite refute les analyses habituelles des tendances temporelles de l'IMC tout en etayant les conclusions du premier chapitre. Tous les indicateurs de sante presentent cependant des limites; cela ne veut pas necessairement dire qu'un indicateur donne ne convient pas a l'application a laquelle il est destine. Il s'avere qu'en raison de sa correlation elevee avec les mesures directes du pourcentage d'adiposite (9), l'IMC est recommande pour surveiller les tendances temporelles de la prevalence du risque du a une adiposite elevee a l'echelle d'une population (9-12).

L'obesite definie selon l'IMC est un indicateur de faible sensibilite, mais de forte specificite (9,11) pour l'adiposite elevee, ce qui entraine une sous-estimation de la population a risque. Ce phenomene est aggrave par l'important biais systematique vers le bas de l'IMC autodeclare, estime a [approximately equal to]7-8% dans l'ESCC de 2008 pour les adultes de 18 a 74 ans (13), mais dont l'ampleur depend en general de l'enquete (14). Par ailleurs, le deplacement de l'adiposite vers le haut observe dans la categorie de l'IMC denotant l'obesite (15) indique que les estimations du taux d'augmentation temporelle de la population a risque pourraient aussi etre sousestimees. En raison de ces principales limites de l'IMC, la progression observee de l'obesite d'apres les donnees de l'ESCC est ainsi une mesure conservatrice des niveaux de risque pour la sante dus au gain de poids dans la population canadienne, ce qui tend a contredire encore davantage les conclusions du chapitre du rapport Fraser.

CONCLUSIONS

Nous avons presente trois problemes dans l'analyse des tendances temporelles de l'IMC tiree du premier chapitre du rapport Fraser (1) :

1. Reperer les chevauchements des intervalles de confiance est une methode statistiquement imparfaite d'evaluation des tendances; les methodes de regression, dont on peut faire l'interpretation statistique sans ambiguite sont preferables. En effet, elles tiennent vraiment compte des changements temporels dans la taille de l'echantillon et mesurent le comportement des donnees dans leur ensemble.

2. La stabilite temporelle dans la prevalence de l'embonpoint (25[less than or equal to]IMC<30) est en fait la consequence d'un changement soutenu dans la distribution generale de l'IMC dans la population.

3. L'IMC est juge fiable pour suivre les tendances ponderales a l'echelle des populations en raison de sa correlation elevee avec le pourcentage d'adiposite. La prevalence de l'obesite, estimee a partir de l'IMC, est une sous-estimation conservatrice de la population a risque en raison d'une adiposite elevee.

Les resultats et l'interpretation d'une analyse des tendances temporelles de l'IMC peuvent etre tres differents si ces problemes ne sont pas pris en compte. En particulier, de nombreuses constatations du premier chapitre du rapport Fraser en sont soit refutees, soit considerablement attenuees. Il semble que le taux d'augmentation de la prevalence de l'obesite est inferieur a ce qu'il a ete par le passe, et qu'il y a eu une curieuse fluctuation vers le bas de la prevalence estimee en 2012 chez les hommes au Canada. Toutefois, les donnees existantes, lorsqu'elles sont soumises a une analyse plus rigoureuse, ne presentent pas l'absence sans equivoque d'une "tendance deconcertante ou negative" alleguee par les auteurs du rapport. De facon generale, nous esperons que le present commentaire contribuera a guider les professionnels de la sante publique dans leur interpretation des analyses des tendances temporelles de l'IMC ou dans la realisation d'analyses similaires.

REFERENCES

(1.) Esmail N, Basham P, Obesity in Canada: Overstated Problems, Misguided Policy Solutions, Institut Fraser, 2014. (http://www.fraserinstitute.org)

(2.) Obesite au Canada, Ottawa, Agence de la sante publique du Canada et Institut canadien d'information sur la sante, 2011.

(3.) Gotay CC, Katzmarzyk PT, Janssen I, Dawson MY, Aminoltejari K, Bartley NL, 2012, "Updating the Canadian obesity maps: An epidemic in progress", Rev can sante publique, 104, 1, p. e64-e68.

(4.) Ng M, Fleming T, Robinson M, Thomson B, Graetz N, Margono C et coll., 2014, "Global, regional, and national prevalence of overweight and obesity in children and adults during 1980-2013: A systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013", Lancet, 384, 9945, p. 766-781.

(5.) Twells L, Gregory D, Reddigan J, Midodzi WK, 2014, "Current and predicted prevalence of obesity in Canada: A trend analysis", JAMC Ouvert, 2, 1, p. E18.

(6.) Schenker N, Gentleman JF, 2001, "On judging the significance of differences by examining the overlap between confidence intervals", Am Stat, 55, 3, p. 182-186.

(7.) Brockwell PJ, Davis RA, Introduction to Time Series and Forecasting, 2e edition, New York, Springer, 2002.

(8.) Statistique Canada, "Embonpoint et obesite chez les adultes (mesures autodeclarees), 2011 ". Sur Internet : http://www.statcan.gc.ca/pub/82-625x/2012001/article/11664-fra.htm (Consulte en version anglaise le 1er novembre 2014.)

(9.) Romero-Corral A, Somers VK, Sierra-Johnson J, Thomas RJ, Collazo-Clavell ML, Korinek J et coll., 2008, "Accuracy of body mass index in diagnosing obesity in the adult general population", Int J Obes (Lond), 32, 6, p. 959-966.

(10.) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Body Mass Index: Considerations for Practitioners, 2014. Sur Internet : http://www.cdc.gov/obesity/ downloads/bmiforpactitioners.pdf (Consulte le 1er novembre 2014.)

(11.) Javed A, Jumean M, Murad MH, Okorodudu D, Kumar S, Somers VK et coll., 2014, "Diagnostic performance of body mass index to identify obesity as defined by body adiposity in children and adolescents: A systematic review and meta-analysis", Pediatr Obes, 10. L'article a d'abord ete publie en ligne : 24 JUN 2014, DOI : 10.1111/ijpo.242.

(12.) Townsend N, Obesity and Overweight Surveillance in England: What is measured and where are the gaps?, Oxford (Royaume-Uni), National Obesity Observatory, 2009.

(13.) Shields M, Connor GS, Janssen I, Tremblay MS, 2011, "Biais dans les estimations autodeclarees de l'obesite dans les enquetes canadiennes sur la sante : le point sur les equations de correction applicables aux adultes", Rapports sur la sante, 22, 3, p. 35-45.

(14.) Connor GS, Tremblay MS, 2010, "The bias in self-reported obesity from 1976 to 2005: A Canada-US comparison", Obesity (Silver Spring), 18, 2, p. 354-361.

(15.) Shields M, Tremblay MS, Connor GS, Janssen I, 2012, "Mesures de l'obesite abdominale a l'interieur des categories d'indice de masse corporelle, 1981 et 2007-2009", Rapports sur la sante, 23, 2, p. 33-38.

Recu : 30 mai 2014 Accepte : 13 octobre 2014

Ernest Lo, Ph.D.

Affiliation de l'auteur

Institut national de sante publique du Quebec; Departement d'epidemiologie, de biostatistique et de sante au travail, Universite McGill, Montreal (Quebec) Correspondance : Ernest Lo, Institut national de sante publique du Quebec, 190, boulevard Cremazie Est, Montreal (Quebec) H2P 1E2, courriel : ernest.lo@inspq.qc.ca Remerciements : L'auteur remercie Denis Hamel, Yun Jen, Patricia Lamontagne, Sylvie Martel et Colin Steensma pour leurs commentaires sur les versions anterieures de cet article.

Conflit d'interets : aucun a declarer.

Note de la redaction : A la demande et aux frais de l'auteur, cet article est publie a la fois en anglais et en francais.
COPYRIGHT 2014 Canadian Public Health Association
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2014 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:COMMENTARY/COMMENTAIRE; body mass index
Author:Lo, Ernest
Publication:Canadian Journal of Public Health
Article Type:Report
Date:Nov 1, 2014
Words:4884
Previous Article:Canada Post community mailboxes: implications for health research.
Next Article:Lessons learned and public health's political role: an interview with John Last.
Topics:

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters