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Price hikes are popping up all over. (Your Business Pricing Update).

Springtime is here, and resin prices are pushing upward with renewed vigor. There's pricing activity in all major-volume resins, but monomer supply disruptions are unsettling prices of PS, PVC, and unsaturated polyester.

PP hikes under way

Polypropylene prices went up 2cents/lb on average in March, a downpayment on the 5cents/lb increase that started off the year. The remaining 3cents/lb was expected to be in place for spot-market buyers at press time in April. Contract buyers were expected to pay 2-4cents more by then.

But even before it was all in the bag, producers Basell, BP, Dow, Huntsman, and Equistar called for an additional 3cents/lb increase, effective May 1. ExxonMobil was rumored to have followed.

Contributing factors: Suppliers want to reverse more than two years of poor profitability. Their resolve is stiffened by higher propylene prices, up 1cents/lb in March with another 2-3cents anticipated for April/May contracts.

Excess resin capacity is estimated at 15-18% (about 2 billion lb), and producers are trying to take up some of the slack. Some plants have been idled over the last six months, and BP is taking 1 billion lb of capacity out of the picture: Its idle 450-million-lb/yr line at Chocolate Bayou is now permanently closed, and it will shut down its 575-million-lb/yr Cedar Bayou plant in Texas by the end of June.

PE prices may inch up

Having implemented a 3cents/lb across-the-board increase in March, PE suppliers aimed to push through another 2-4cents/lb in April. Suppliers expected to get 3-4cents/lb on film grades and 2cents/lb on HDPE injection and blow molding resins. A further 5cents/lb hike (3cents in the case of Chevron Phillips) was pending for May 1.

Contributing factors: The runup in prices is attributed to higher ethylene monomer and energy costs, as well as an uptick in demand. The latter may reflect mostly restocking of processors' inventories.

PET prices pending

Price hikes of 5-6cents/lb were issued by suppliers of PET bottle resin in late February, effective April 1.

Contributing factors: Suppliers blame rising feedstock costs and increased seasonal demand. In addition, price erosion last year knocked tabs down 10cents/lb.

PVC hikes come nonstop

For the fourth month in a row, PVC resin producers announced an increase of 2cents/lb this time for May 1. The first 2cents stuck in March, and resin producers as well as customers anticipate that the second hike will stick in April.

Contributing factors: Pipe demand finally began to pick up in March and April. There were rumors that a few Southeastern pipe plants were unable to get enough resin, and some plants confirmed they would have bought more if it had been available. The sudden resin tightness reflects a shortage of vinyl monomer caused by cutbacks in chlorine production. Meanwhile, Shintech took over Borden's 660-million-lb PVC plant in Addis, La., and then closed it indefinitely for renovations. Shintech said it will not reopen before the third quarter. Industry analysts say that if this capacity remains out of action, it could add 1cents/lb to resin prices.

Monomer drives PS hike

Polystyrene producers posted their third hike of the year, this time for 4cents on May 1. EPS prices went up 6cents/lb in March and April, and producers are asking for 6cents/lb more May 1.

Contributing factors: Styrene monomer prices are shooting up farther and faster than polymer. Styrene rose 3cents in March, and hikes of 3-8cents were on the table for April. So profit margins for PS producers are worse than ever.

Styrene monomer is being squeezed by benzene prices, which soared from 75cents/lb at the turn of the year to $1.28 in mid April, accounting for over a nickel in higher monomer cost. Also, styrene producers here and in Europe experienced a series of outages that disrupted monomer supply.

Composite resins rise

Unsaturated polyesters and vinyl esters are poised to go up 4cents/lb, following announcements by AOC, Ashland, Cook Composites, Dow, and Reichhold. AOC also raised gel coats and low-profile additives 4cents. All the increases are dated May 13-15.

Contributing factors: Raw-materials costs, particularly styrene and glycols, are cited as the culprits. Unexpected production outages created a tight supply situation for styrene.
Market Prices Effective Mid-April (a)

RESIN GRADE (b) cents/LB cents/CU IN (c)

ABS
 MED IMPACT 70-80 2.7-3.0
 HI IMPACT 82-88 3.0-3.3
 X-HI IMPACT 92-95 3.4-3.5
 HI HEAT 102-110 3.8-4.1
 PIPE 68-72 2.5-2.6
 SHEET 77-80 2.8-2.9
 TRANSPARENT 150-160 5.8-6.2
 FITTINGS 78-82 2.9-3.0
 PLATING 95-105 3.5-3.9
 FLAME RET 118-129 5.2-5.7
 STRUCT FM 83-97 3.6-4.3
 10% GLASS 130-150 5.1-6.0
 30% GLASS 126-146 5.8-6.7
ABS/PC ALLOY 135-140 5.5-5.8
ABS/PVC ALLOY 130-135 5.8-6.1
ABS/NYLON ALLOY 167-189 6.3-7.2

ACETAL

 HOMOPOL 130-147 6.7-7.3
 20% GLASS 160-220 9.0-12.4
 COPOLYMER 133-137 6.8-7.0
 25% GLASS 160-215 9.2-12.3

ACRYLIC

 G-P 72-102 3.0-4.3
 IMPACT 130-191 5.4-7.9

ACRYLONI-
TRILE COPOL

 EXTRUSION 101-116 4.0-4.6
 INJECTION 120-135 4.8-5.4

ALKYD 65-74 4.9-5.5

CELLULOSICS

 ACETATE 187 8.6
 CAB 184 7.9
 CAP 184 7.9

DAP (G-P) 251-497 16.3-34.7

EPOXY

 G-P RESIN 116-126 NA (d)
 COMPOUNDS
 C/B/T (e) 123-166 9.4-12.9
 R/C/D (f) 208-271 15.3-20.1
 SEMICONDUCTOR
 NOVOLAC 193-228 13.1-15.9
 ANHYDRIDE 188-268 13.9-19.2

EVA

 INJECTION 60-95 2.4-4.0
 FILM EXTRU 55-87 2.4-2.7

EVOH 265 11.3

FLUORO-
POLYMER

 CTFE 4500 346.6
 ECTFE 1400-1600 108.3-123.8
 ETFE 1100-1600 73.6-107.1
 FEP 925-1400 71.3-107.9
 PFA 1700-2400 131.6-185.8
 PTFE 450-900 34.8-69.7
 PVDF 650-800 41.4-50.9

IONOMER

 PACKAGING 127-166 4.3-6.0
 INDUSTRIAL 150-244 5.0-8.3

LIQUID-
CRYSTAL
POLYMERS

 INJECTION
 MIN FILLED 690-1035 44.2-72.1
 GLASS FILLED 695-895 40-52
 CARBON FILLED 1700-2000 83.2-138.6
 UNFILLED 1000-1200 58-70
 EXTRUSION
 UNFILLED 1200-2200 60.5-110.9

MELAMINE
COMPOUND 90-94 5.5-5.6
MELAMINE/
PHENOLIC
COMPOUND 75-83 4.5-5.0

NYLON

 TYPE 6 124-139 6.2-7.0
 MIN FILLED 119-132 5.9-6.6
 30% GLASS 150-160 7.2-7.7
 TYPE 66 140-155 7.4-8.2
 MIN FILLED 140-148 7.4-7.8
 30% GLASS 180-190 8.8-9.3
 TYPE 69 250-276 9.7-10.7
 TYPE 6/10 286-313 12.4-13.6
 TYPE 612 400 15.3
 30% GLASS 309-311 14.7
 40% GLASS 309 14.7
 TYPE 46 295 12.6
 TYPE 11 329-341 13.6-14.1
 30% GLASS 331-350 15.0-15.8
 40% GLASS 347-360 17.7-18.5
 TYPE 12 318-341 12.1-13.0
 30% GLASS 327-350 14.7-15.8
 50% GLASS 299-340 15.6-17.8
 TRANSPARENT
 AMORPHOUS 247-360 10.3-15.0

PHENOLIC
MOLD COMP 55.5-87.5 2.8-4.0
 REINFORCED
 GRADES 100.5-267.5 6.0-15.9

POLYAMIDE-
IMIDE (g)

 UNFILLED 2310-3045 124.7-164.4
 30% GLASS 2250-2985 130.4-173.0
 30% CARBON FIB. 3260-3950 173.6-210.5

POLYARYLATE 200-280 8.8-12.3

POLYARYL-SULFONE 440 21.8

POLYBUTYLENE
 G-P 94-96 3.1
 FILM 88-91 2.9
 PIPE
 COLD WATER 118-120 3.9-4.0
 HOT WATER 162-166 5.5-5.6

POLYCARBONATE
 INJECTION 138-165 5.9-7.0
 20% GLASS 177-190 7.6-8.2
 30% GLASS 178-217 7.6-9.3
 EXTRUSION 127-145 5.4-6.2
 BLOW MOLD 140-170 6.0-7.3
 STRUCT FOAM 149-181 6.4-7.8
 20% GLASS 235-255 10.1-11.0
 FR 166-197 7.1-8.5
 CD 135-155 5.8-6.6

POLYESTER (TP)
PBT TYPE
 UNFILLED 143-150 6.9
 HI-IMP 154-165 7.6
 30% GLASS, FR 165-187 10.0
 STRUCT FOAM 159-165 NA (d)
PET
 BOTTLE (RAILCAR) 58-62 3.0-3.2
MOD PET
 30% GLASS 132-143 7.4
 55% GLASS 148-155 9.8
 30% GLASS,
 FLAME RET 147-157 9.2
 PETG COPOL 114-124 5.2-5.6

POLYESTER THERMOSET
 G-P ORTHO 51-55 NA (d)
 ISOPHTHALIC 70-80 NA (d)
 BIS-A 120-150 NA (d)

PEEK 4400 231
 30% GLASS 3300 173

POLYETHERIMIDE 641-646 29.3-29.5
 30% GLASS 526-531 24.0-24.2

POLYETHER-
 KETONE (PEK) 2950 130.1
 30% GLASS 2600 153

POLYETHER
SULFONE 362 18.50
 30% GLASS 500 25.56

POLYETHYLENE
 (RAILCAR)
 LDPE
 G-P MOLDING
 & EXTRU 46-48 1.5-1.6
 INJECTION 46-48 1.5-1.6
 LID RESIN 47-49 1.6
 LINER 46-48 1.6-1.6
 CLARITY 40-42 1.4
 EXTRU COATG 45-47 1.5
 BLOW MOLD 47-49 1.5-1.6
LLDPE,
BUTENE-BASED
 G-P MOLDING 32-34 1.2-1.3
 FILM 31-33 1.2-1.3
 ROTOMOLD 32-34 1.2-1.4
LLDPE, HAO-BASED
 G-P MOLDING 38-40 1.4
 LID RESIN 40-42 1.4
 LINER FILM 37-39 1.4
HDPE
 G-P INJ MOLD 34-36 1.3
 FILM 38-40 1.4
 BLOW MOLD 36-38 1.4
HMW-HDPE
 BLOW MOLDING 56-58 1.0-2.0
 FILM 59-61 2.0-2.1
 PIPE 61-63 2.1-2.2
 UHMW-PE 100-125 3.6-3.7

PPE/PPO-BASED RESIN
 INJECTION 180 6.8
 20% GLASS (h) 283 12.3
 30% GLASS (h) 291 13.3
 EXTRUSION (h) 242 9.2
 STRUCT FM 231 NA (d)

PPS
 40% GLASS 340-385 20-23
 55% GLASS/
 MINERAL 275-295 18
 65% GLASS/
 MINERAL 205-260 15-19

POLYPROPLYLENE
 (RAILCAR)
 G-P HOMOPOL
 INJECTION 35-37 1.2
 EXTRUSION
 FIBER 33-35 1.1-1.2
 PROFILES 36-38 1.2-1.3
 RANDOM COPOL
 BLOW MOLDING 40-42 1.3
 FILM 39-41 1.3
 INJECTION 38-41 1.3
 IMPACT COPOL
 MED IMP 49-51 1.6-1.7
 HI IMP 53-55 1.6-1.7

POLYSTYRENE
 (RAILCAR)
 G-P CRYSTAL 38-40 [up arrow] 1.5 [up arrow]
 HI HEAT 39-42 [up arrow] 1.5-1.6 [up arrow]
 HIPS 41-44 [up arrow] 1.5-1.6 [up arrow]
 SUPER HI IMP 58-62 [up arrow] 2.2-2.3 [up arrow]
 FR 81-92 3.0-3.5
 STRUCT FM (FR) 91-93 NA (d)

EPS
 UNMODIFIED 74-78 NA (d)
 MODIFIED 78-79 NA (d)

POLYSULFONE 440 19.71
10% GLASS 430 20.6
30% GLASS 372 20.01

POLYURE-
THANE (TP)
 ESTER TYPE 185-255 8-11
 ETHER TYPE 245-295 10.6-13

PU
ISOCYANATES
 POLYMERIC MDI 105-115 NA (d)
 80/20 TDI 110-120 NA (d)

PVC RESIN
(RAILCAR)
 G-P HOMOPOL 25-28 [up arrow] NA (d)
 PIPE 21-22 [up arrow] NA (d)
 FILM 33-36 [up arrow] NA (d)
 COPOLYMER
 FLOORING 44-46 NA (d)
 DISPERSION
 HOMOPOLY 56-60 NA (d)
 COPOLYMER 60-64 NA (d)
 CPVC PIPE
 COMPOUND 119 NA (d)

PVDC
 EXTRUDABLE 162 NA (d)

SILICONES
 MOLD. COMP. 581-640 38.1-39.3
 SPECIALTY GR. 891-3148 NA (d)
 SILICONE/EPOXY 339-343 22.5-22.8

STYRENE-
ACRYLIC 108-112 3.7-4.0

SAN (G-P) 66-74 2.5-2.8

STYRENE
MALEIC
ANHYDRIDE
 G-P 110-115 4.2-4.3
 HI IMP 130-140 4.2-4.5
 FR 175-183 6.7-7.0

TP ELASTOMERS
 OLEFINIC 70-76 2.4
 POLYAMIDE 287-337 10.4-12.3
 POLYESTER 200-310 8.8-13.6
 STYRENIC 83-237 2.9-8.3

UREA MOLDING
COMPOUND
 BLACK & BROWN 67-78 3.6-4.1
 WHITE & IVORY 72 3.8

VINYL ESTER
 COR RES 147 NA (d)
 HEAT & COR RES 161 NA (d)

KEY: Colored areas indicate pricing activity. An arrow ([down arrow])
indicates direction of price change

(a)Truckload unless otherwise specified

(b)Unfilled natural color unless otherwise specified

(c)Based on typical of average density

(d)Not applicable

(e)Novolac and anhydride grades for coils bushings transformers

(f)Novolac and anhydride grades for resistors capacitors diodes

(g)In quantities of 20,000lb

(h)19,800lb load
COPYRIGHT 2002 Gardner Publications, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
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Article Details
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Comment:Price hikes are popping up all over. (Your Business Pricing Update).(Statistical Data Included)
Author:Block, Debbie Galante
Publication:Plastics Technology
Article Type:Statistical Data Included
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:May 1, 2002
Words:1880
Previous Article:BASF cuts its EPS capacity 20%. (Your Business in Brief).
Next Article:Toy molders battle imports. (Your Business Outlook).
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