Printer Friendly

Position Announcements.

Faculty Position in Environmental Health Sciences--Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University

The Division of Environmental Health Sciences (EHS) of the Joseph L. Mailman School of Public Health at Columbia University seeks to recruit 1-2 new faculty members at the rank of assistant, associate, or full professor. The division has considerable research expertise in chemical carcinogenesis, molecular epidemiology, metal toxicology, community-based research, and air quality and respiratory disorders. It is home to an NIEHS P30 Center, a Children's Environmental Health Center, and a Superfund Basic Research Program. The division's strong teaching program offers M.P.H., Dr.P.H., and Ph.D. degrees, and attracts outstanding applicants. While candidates in all areas of EHS will be considered, special consideration will be given to those with active laboratory-based research programs in the following areas: asthma, neurotoxicology/neurodegenerative disease, metal biochemistry, and exposure assessment.

Applicants should send a letter describing research and teaching interests, a full curriculum vitae, and the names of three references. Columbia University is an equal opportunity/affirmative action employer; women and minorities are encouraged to apply.

Contact: Joseph Graziano, Ph.D., Head, Division of EHS, 60 Haven Avenue (B-1), New York, NY 10032 USA

Postdoctoral Fellowship, University of Southern California

A postdoctoral fellowship is available to study effects of drugs and toxicants on reproduction. Must have Ph.D. in related field, be highly skilled in in vivo and cell culture systems, and be experienced in molecular biology, toxicology, and/or reproductive biology. Strong writing skills required. Applicants should fax curriculum vitae with cover letter and three references.

Contact: fax: 323-226-3632

Postdoctoral Research Opportunities at the NIEHS

Listed below are opportunities to conduct research with NIEHS scientists in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina. Applicants must not possess more than five years of postdoctoral experience. To apply, submit a cover letter, curriculum vitae, bibliography, and names of three references to the hiring scientist at the corresponding laboratory and mail drop in care of NIEHS, PO Box 12233, Research Triangle Park, NC 27709 USA. The cover letter should include the position title and HNV number. These vacancies are also available on the NIEHS World Wide Web site (http://www.niehs.nih.gov/vacancy/postdoc.htm).

Minorities, women, and handicapped individuals are encouraged to apply. All applicants receive consideration without regard to race, religion, color, national origin, sex, physical or mental handicap, political affiliation, age (with statutory exceptions), or any other nonmerit factor. Positions are open until filled.

Mitochondrial DNA Replication (HNV 97-19)

A position is available to study the molecular mechanisms of DNA replication of human mitochondrial DNA. Research will focus on the in vitro characterization of human mitochondrial DNA replication proteins and investigate the kinetics of wild-type and mutant forms of the mitochondrial DNA polymerase. Candidates should have a Ph.D. in biochemistry, molecular biology, or biophysical chemistry, and research experience in nucleic acid enzymology and/or protein purification.

Contact: William Copeland, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, MD E3-01, 919-541-4792, fax: 919-541-7613, e-mail: copelan1@niehs.nih.gov

Prostaglandins and Related Lipids in Cancer (HNV 97-25)

This laboratory is studying the expression of prostaglandin H synthases and lipoxygenases in the development of colon, breast, and other cancers. We are especially interested in the interaction of prostaglandins and other lipids with the signaling pathways regulating cell growth or apoptosis. The applicant should have a Ph.D. and technical experience in analytical methods, protein biochemistry, and molecular biology. Expertise in cell culture and experience with prostaglandin H synthases or lipoxygenases is beneficial.

Contact: Thomas Eling, Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis, MD A2-01, 919-541-3911, fax: 919-541-0146, e-mail: eling@niehs. nih.gov

Molecular Neurobiology (HNV 98-29)

The signal transduction pathways regulating expression of neuropeptide and cytokine genes in neural and glial systems are being investigated through studies on the effects of neuropeptides on the biosynthesis and release of cytokines in microglial cells and potential roles of cytokines in neurodegeneration. Applicants should have experience in neuropharmacology, neurochemistry, or molecular biology.

Contact: Jau-Shyong Hong, Laboratory of Pharmacology and Chemistry, MD F1-01, 919-541-2358, fax: 919-541-0841, e-mail: hong3@niehs.nih.gov

Molecular and Cellular Biology (HNV 97)

We are studying the regulation of gene expression during differentiation and the mechanism of action of retinoids, particularly the role of nuclear receptors and other transcriptional factors in the control of gene transcription. Studies involve characterization of promoters of several genes. Applicants must have experience in molecular biology techniques.

Contact: Anton Jetten, Laboratory of Pulmonary Pathobiology, MD D2-01, 919-541-2768, e-mail: jetten@niehs.nih.gov

Cyclooxygenases, NSAIDs, and Cancer (HNV 99-7)

We have shown that the knockout of COX-1 and COX-2 genes reduces the incidence of skin and intestinal tumorigenesis. Preliminary work has indicated that altered rates of apoptosis and terminal differentiation occur in these organs in the COX-deficient mice and may account for the reduced tumorigenesis. Further studies will focus on specific signal transduction pathways that are affected by COX deficiency and that alter apoptotic and differentiation pathways. A second research opportunity of this position will be the characterization of mice that overexpress COX-1 or COX-2, including their carcinogenic susceptibilities and the signaling pathways altered due to COX overexpression.

Contact: Robert Langenbach, Laboratory of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Mutagenesis, MD F1-05, 919-541-7558, fax: 919-541-1460, e-mail: langenb1@niehs.nih.gov

Stress-Induced Signaling Pathways (HNV 98-5)

We are investigating the cellular response to stress, including the stress-signaling pathways that protect against subsequent injury. We are studying preconditioning (in which brief intermittent periods of stress reduce lethal injury during a subsequent prolonged period of stress such as ischemia) using perfused hearts and isolated cells. We are also studying signaling pathways involved in apoptosis, especially alterations in calcium homeostasis and its role in apoptosis.

Contact: Elizabeth Murphy, Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis, MD D2-03, 919-541-3873, fax: 919-541-7880, e-mail: murphy1@niehs.nih.gov

Regulation of Signal Transduction Pathways by Adaptor Proteins (HNV 98-22)

A position is available to study the function of the ShcC adaptor protein in the regulation of signal transduction cascades controlled by tyrosine kinases. We are also interested in understanding the role of ShcC in neural development and differentiation using a combination of dominant negative proteins and activated forms of ShcC. Current evidence suggests distinct functions of the various Shc family members and we are interested in identifying brain-specific targets of ShcC using both yeast two hybrid as well as bacterial expression cloning strategies. A strong background in protein biochemistry, molecular biology, and tissue culture is preferred.

Contact: John O'Bryan, Laboratory of Signal Transduction, MD F3-06, 919-541-3619, fax: 919-541-1898, e-mail: obryan@niehs.nih.gov

Renal Secretory Transport Mechanisms (HNV 97-16)

The transport mechanisms responsible for elimination of xenobiotics are studied in epithelial tissues including kidney and choroid plexus. Applicant will examine the mechanisms and energetics of organic anion transport using cultured monolayers, isolated membrane vesicles, and molecular probes. Experience in the biochemistry, molecular biology, or physiology of membrane function is expected. Applicant should have a Ph.D. or M.D.

Contact: John B. Pritchard, Laboratory of Pharmacology and Chemistry, MD F1-03, 919-541-4054, fax: 919-541-5737, e-mail: pritchard@ niehs.nih.gov

Mechanisms by Which Organisms Produce Mutations (HNV 99)

Studies are aimed at understanding the mechanisms by which organisms produce mutations. Specific projects involve the isolation and molecular characterization of antimutator mutants in E. coli, the genetic and biochemical analysis of DNA replication fidelity in this organism, and a structure-function analysis of the dnaE and dnaQ genes (encoding, respectively, the DNA polymerase and exonucleolytic proofreading activity).

Contact: Roel M. Schaaper, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, MD E3-01, 919-541-4250, e-mail: schaaper@niehs.nih.gov

Transgenic Molecular Biology (HNV 99-5)

One position is available in the Cancer Biology Group. It involves elucidating the molecular events in the induction of tumors in transgenic mouse models. Part of the work of the Cancer Biology Group is focused on skin tumorigenesis in the v-Ha-ras transgenic mouse model (Tg.AC), which expresses oncogenic ras from a zeta globin promoter. This position will be to work on the characterization and identification of the inverted transgene promoter region from normal (expressing) and mutant (nonexpressing) Tg.AC mice. A variety of molecular biological methodologies (molecular biology, genetics, and biochemistry) will be required to attack this project.

Contact: Raymond W. Tennant, Laboratory of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Mutagenesis, MD F1-05, 919-541-4175, fax: 919-541-1460, e-mail: mitchel3@niehs.nih.gov

Genomic Instability in Vitro and in Vivo (HNV 99-4)

Two postdoctoral positions are available immediately to study the mechanisms by which genomic alterations arise either spontaneously or as the result of in vivo or in vitro mutagen/carcinogen exposure. In vivo studies include characterization and application of the Big Blue transgenic mouse mutation assay system. In addition, rodent and human cell lines are used for in vitro studies of gene mutation and genomic instability. Candidates must have a strong background in molecular biology and/or somatic cell genetics. Individuals with experience in anti-sense regulation of gene expression are especially encouraged to apply. The initial appointment is renewable up to five years.

Contact: Kenneth R. Tindall, Laboratory of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Mutagenesis, MD F1-08, 919-541-3275, fax: 919-541-1460, e-mail: tindall@niehs.nih.gov

Mechanism of Action and Function of Nuclear Receptors (HNV 99-9)

A postdoctoral position is available to study the molecular mechanism of action and function of nuclear receptors. The functions of these receptors are examined by identifying target genes using cDNA array techniques and knockout models. Interaction of nuclear receptors with other nuclear proteins is studied by two-hybrid system analysis. Candidates should have a strong background in molecular biology.

Contact: Anton M. Jetten, Laboratory of Pulmonary Pathobiology, MD D2-01, 919-541-2768, fax: 919-541-4133, e-mail: jetten@niehs. nih.gov

Cellular Mechanisms of Xenobiotic Transport (HNV 99-13)

We study the basic mechanisms that drive xenobiotic transport in excretory epithelia (kidney, liver) and barrier tissues (blood-brain barrier, choroid plexus, gut). Experience in the biochemistry, molecular biology, or physiology of membrane transport is expected.

Contact: David S. Miller, Laboratory of Pharmacology and Chemistry, MD F1-03, 919-541-3235, fax: 919-541-1898, e-mail: miller@niehs. nih.gov

Cell Cycle Checkpoint Signaling Mechanisms and pATM Function (HNV 99-14)

A position is available to investigate signal transduction mechanisms regulating cell cycle checkpoints, with particular interest in the role of the ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) gene product. Studies will focus on the regulation of cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase complexes in response to DNA damage following exposure to selected environmental carcinogens. Candidates should have a Ph.D. or equivalent degree in molecular biology, cell biology, biochemistry, or a related field. Recent graduates are encouraged to apply.

Contact: Richard S. Paules, Laboratory of Environmental Carcinogenesis and Mutagenesis, MD F1-05, fax: 919-541-1460, e-mail paules@ niehs.nih.gov

Biostatistical Methods in Genetics (HNV 99-15)

A position is available in this branch to develop improved statistical methods for likelihood-based genetic inference using siblings and their parents. Outcomes of interest could be dichotomous disease states or quantitative traits.

Contact: Clarice Weinberg, Biostatistics Branch, MD A3-03, 919-541-4927, fax: 919-541-4311, e-mail: weinberg@niehs.nih.gov

Molecular Biology (HNV 99-16)

A position is available for an individual with solid training and experience in molecular biology (library formation, cloning, bacterial vectors, knockout techniques) to assume ongoing projects dealing with opioid receptors.

Contact: L. H. Lazarus, Laboratory of Computational Biology and Risk Analysis, MD C3-04, 919-541-3238, fax: 919-541-0626, e-mail: lazarus@niehs.nih.gov

Glucocorticoid and Orphan Nuclear Receptor Action (HNV 99-17)

A position is available to study novel mechanisms of glucocorticoid and orphan nuclear receptor action. Studies can include cloning of receptor-regulated genes, analysis of mechanisms of gene repression by nuclear receptors, evaluation of the role of receptor phosphorylation in receptor signaling, development of novel model systems to study coactivators/corepressors, and creation of tissue-specific receptor knockouts in animals. Expertise in molecular biology, biochemistry, cell biology, or transgenics is desirable. The laboratory is highly interactive and equipped with state-of-the-art equipment.

Contact: John Cidlowski, Laboratory of Signal Transduction, MD E2-02, 919-541-1564, fax: 919-541-1367, e-mail: cidlowski@niehs.nih.gov

Calcium Signaling (HNV 99-26)

The initial appointment would be for two years with the possibility of extensions for an additional one or two years. This laboratory is interested in mechanisms of calcium signaling in a variety of nonexcitable cell models, including epithelial cells, lymphocytes, and fibroblasts. We investigate mechanisms of intracellular storage and release of calcium as well as mechanisms for regulation of calcium movements across the plasma membrane. Applicants will be considered with training in any related area of research, including cell or molecular biology, physiology, or pharmacology. However, at this time we are particularly interested in individuals with prior training in the areas of either cell biology or molecular biology of ion channels. Individuals coming to the laboratory with one of these skills would have the opportunity to expand their training into new areas including molecular biology, electrophysiology, single cell microfluorimetry, and confocal microscopy.

Contact: James W. Putney, Jr., Laboratory of Signal Transduction, MD F2-02, 919-541-1420, fax: 919-541-1898, e-mail: putney@niehs.nih.gov

Eicosanoids and Pulmonary Immune Function (HNV 99-37)

A position is available to study alterations in pulmonary immune function and host resistance in cyclooxygenase-deficient mice. Emphasis will be placed on delineation of the immunologic mechanisms involved in pulmonary hypersensitivity responses to allergens and the role of inflammatory mediators in asthma/airway hyperresponsiveness. Applicants should possess a Ph.D. in molecular biology, cell biology, biochemistry, immunology, toxicology, or a related field. Salary will be commensurate with experience.

Contact: Dori Germolec, Laboratory of Toxicology, MD C1-03, 919-541-3230, fax: 919-541-0870, e-mail: germolec@niehs.nih.gov

Arachidonic Acid Metabolism (HNV 99-38)

A position is available to study the biological significance of cytochrome P450 arachidonic acid metabolites in the lung and intestine. Emphasis will be placed on developing novel systems to study the effects of altered P450 expression on cell and organ function. Applicants should possess a Ph.D. in molecular biology, cell biology, biochemistry, toxicology, or a related field. Salary will be commensurate with experience.

Contact: Darryl C. Zeldin, Laboratory of Pulmonary Pathobiology, MD D2-01, 919-541-1169, fax: 919-541-4133, e-mail: zeldin@niehs.nih.gov

Mechanisms of Cell Adhesion and Migration (HNV 99-39)

A position is available for a highly motivated individual to join a research group interested in characterizing molecular mechanisms of cell adhesion and migration focusing on the regulation of integrin receptors, adhesion-mediated signal transduction, and mechanisms of tumor cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Applicants must have a Ph.D., M.D., or equivalent. A strong background in molecular and cell biology is required.

Contact: Steven K. Akiyama, Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis, MD A2-09, 919-541-3467, fax: 919-541-5465, e-mail: akiyama@ niehs.nih.gov

Protein NMR (HNV 99-40)

The NMR group is seeking to fill a full-time position in the analysis of protein structure by NMR spectroscopy. Current projects include the analysis of E. coli DNA polymerase structure and the development and application of interligand Overhauser effects. The successful candidate must have a significant background in the analysis of complex NMR experiments using automated resonance assignment software such as NMRView, FELIX, or ANSIG, and structural analysis based on NMR data using XPLOR, DYANA, or analogous software. The initial appointment is for a period of two years, renewable for a maximum of five years. Available instrumentation includes a Varian Inova 600-MHz spectrometer, UnityPlus 400- and 500-MHz spectrometers, and two Varian Unity 500-MHz spectrometers. Salary is the standard NIH fellowship of $26,500 for applicants with no prior postdoctoral experience, with adjustments based on the experience of the candidate.

Contact: Robert London, Laboratory of Structural Biology, MD MR-01,919-541-7880, fax: 919-541-4879, e-mail: london@niehs.nih.gov

Mechanisms of Chemical-Induced Hepatocarcinogenesis (HNV 99-41)

A fellow position is available in the Metabolism and Exposure Markers Section of the Laboratory of Pharmacology and Chemistry. The incumbent will study the mechanisms of chemical-induced hepatocarcinogenesis both in vivo and in vitro with emphasis on peroxisome proliferators. This research will include characterization of chemical and biological markers of exposure as well as other mechanism-based biological end points such as cell proliferation, programmed cell death, and gene expression. Molecular biology experience including isolation of RNA, DNA, and proteins, Western and Northern blot analysis, RTPCR analysis of mRNAs, and immunohistochemistry are desirable. Qualifications for this position are a doctorate degree in chemistry, pharmacology, toxicology, biochemistry, molecular biology, or a related area. For additional information on our program, visit the Laboratory of Pharmacology and Chemistry Web site at http://dir.niehs.nih.gov/dirlpc/home.htm.

Contact: Burhan Ghanayem, Laboratory of Pharmacology and Chemistry, MD B3-10, 919-541-3369, fax: 919-541-4632, e-mail: ghanayem@ niehs.nih.gov

Cell Adhesion and Signal Transduction Tumor Cell Metastasis (HNV 99-42)

Intramural Research Training Award positions are available in the Metastasis Section of the Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis to study signaling pathways and mechanisms of cell adhesion and invasion in human tumor cells. A Ph.D. with a strong background in molecular biology and/or signal transduction is essential. Ongoing research emphasizes 1) protein kinase C and MAP kinase signaling pathways induced by fatty acids in tumor cells in vitro, 2) mechanisms of tumor cell adhesion, migration, and invasion in vitro, 3) alterations in cytoskeletal structures in metastatic tumor cells, and 4) the role of protein glycosylation in tumor cell behavior. Additional information on our program can be found by visiting the Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis Web site at http:// dir.niehs.nih.gov/dirlmc/home.htm.

Contact: John Roberts, Laboratory of Molecular Carcinogenesis, MD C2-14, 919-541-5023, fax: 919-541-7784, e-mail: roberts1@niehs.nih.gov

Nuclear Receptors in Molecular Toxicology (HNV 99-43)

An Intramural Research Training Award or Visiting Fellow position is available to study the roles of nuclear orphan receptors in the induction of drug-metabolizing enzymes such as cytochromes P450. The receptor CAR translocates to the liver nucleus following treatment with phenobarbital and activates the P450 genes. The signal transduction pathway that regulates the phenobarbital-elicited nuclear translocation of CAR will be explored. Candidates should have a strong background in signal transduction and demonstrated experience with molecular biology techniques. Additional information on our program can be found by visiting the Pharmacogenetics Section Web site at http:// dir.niehs.nih.gov/dirlrdt/home.htm#Pharm.

Contact: Masahiko Negishi, Laboratory of Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology, MD E4-07, 919-541-2404, fax: 919-541-0696, e-mail: negishi@niehs.nih.gov

Structure-Function Studies of Zinc Finger Proteins (HNV 99-44)

A position is available to study the relationships between structure and function of a recently described family of zinc finger proteins, some of whose members appear to be involved in regulating mRNA stability. The research project will focus on several aspects of this process, from transcription of the genes encoding these proteins to functional studies of normal and mutant proteins. Candidates should have a Ph.D. in molecular or cellular biology, biochemistry, or a related discipline.

Contact: Perry J. Blackshear, Laboratory of Signal Transduction, MD A2-05, 919-541-4899, fax: 919-541-4571, e-mail: black009@niehs.nih.gov

Structure-Function Studies of Prokaryotic Nucleotide Excision Repair Proteins (HNV 00-1)

Two postdoctoral positions are available to study how nucleotide excision repair proteins recognize and process DNA damage. Studies using several biochemical and molecular biology approaches will characterize how the UvrABC nuclease system interacts with DNA substrates containing specific DNA lesions. Activities of the E. coli Uvr proteins are being compared with their thermophilic homologues from the bacteria Bacillus caldotenax. Studies will examine the thermodynamics and kinetics of repair protein binding to fluorescence DNA adducts using fluorescence spectroscopy. X-ray diffraction and 2D-NMR techniques combined with site-directed mutagenesis will allow characterization of the pertinent amino acid-DNA contacts that provide favorable interactions for increased specificity and stability of the protein-DNA interactions involved in damage recognition and repair.

Contact: Ben Van Houten, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, MD D3-01, 919-541-2799, fax: 919-541-5064, e-mail: vanhout1@niehs.nih.gov

Functional Consequences of Mitochondrial Nucleic Acid Damage (HNV 00-2)

One postdoctoral position is available to study the molecular consequences of damage to nucleic acids in the mitochondria. Mitochondrial DNA and RNA are vulnerable to damage by oxidative stress. We are currently testing the hypothesis that reactive oxygen leads to alterations in mitochondrial function, rapid and extensive damage to mitochondrial nucleic acids, alterations in electron transport, and the production of more ROS. These events ultimately lead to a catastrophic demise of mitochondrial function in a feed-forward damage cascade. Studies using biochemical and molecular biology approaches will characterize mitochondrial function, mitochondrial DNA damage, and mitochondrial RNA levels and apoptosis following aging and oxidative stress. These approaches are being used in specific tissue culture and mouse models of neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson disease.

Contact: Ben Van Houten, Laboratory of Molecular Genetics, MD D3-01, 919-541-2799, fax: 919-541-5064, e-mail: vanhout1@niehs.nih.gov

Signal Transduction by Inositol Phosphates (HNV 00-3)

This laboratory is recruiting biochemists/molecular biologists to join a productive research team that applies biochemical, molecular, and electrophysiological techniques to the study of signal transduction by inositol phosphates. Novel signaling proteins are being identified, and their actions are being analyzed at a molecular level using several approaches, including mutagenesis and the manipulation of their cellular expression in appropriate cell models. A strong background in molecular biology and/or biochemistry is required. For details of the laboratory's recent achievements, see http:// dir.niehs.nih.gov/dirlst/shears.htm.

Contact: Stephen B. Shears, Laboratory of Signal Transduction, MD F2-06, 919-541-1898, fax: 919-541-0793, e-mail: shears@niehs.nih.gov

Molecular Epidemiological Studies of Gene-Environment Interaction (HNV 00-5)

Studies of gene-environment interaction are performed. A molecular biologist/toxicologist is sought to study human genetic susceptibility markers in environmental exposure-induced disease. The individual will participate in the ongoing development of assays for at-risk genotypes for genes that modulate carcinogen exposure, DNA repair, and disease. These assays will be applied to multiple end point molecular epidemiology studies of genetic toxicology and cancer. Samples from numerous human studies are available for analysis, and additional studies are in progress. Experience with PCR, DNA sequencing, and other molecular techniques is desirable. We offer excellent resources and, opportunities for collaboration in a growing program. While candidates with five or fewer years of relevant postdoctoral research experience are eligible, recent graduates are encouraged to apply.

Contact: Douglas A. Bell, Laboratory of Computational Biology and Risk Analysis, MD C3-03, 919-541-7686, fax: 919-541-1479, e-mail: bell1@niehs.nih.gov

Genetic Basis for Human Gene Expression Profiles Using Microarray Technology (HNV 00-6)

A postdoctoral position is available to investigate the role of human genetic variation on gene expression profiles following exposure to environmental toxicants and during disease development. Environmental genomic studies will focus on developing gene expression profiles from human in vitro cell cultures and fresh lymphocytes that have been exposed to DNA-damaging agents and other carcinogens. The cells utilized are part of the NIEHS Environmental Genome Project and have an extensive database of genetic polymorphisms. Expression profiles will be related to specific exposures and genotypes, with the long-range goal of relating expression profiles to disease risk. Expression profiles will be generated using the NIEHS's state-of-the-art cDNA microarray facility.

Candidates should have a Ph.D., M.D., or equivalent degree in molecular biology, cell biology, biochemistry, genetics, toxicology, or a related field. Additional knowledge of biostatistics and bioinformatics is desirable. While candidates with five or fewer years of relevant postdoctoral research experience are eligible, recent graduates are encouraged to apply.

Contact: Douglas A. Bell, Laboratory of Computational Biology and Risk Analysis, MD C3-03, 919-541-7686, fax: 919-541-1479, e-mail: bell1@niehs.nih.gov

Mass Spectrometric Characterization of Proteins (HNV 00-8)

A position will be available in September 2000 to study the application of mass spectrometry to protein structure analysis, including tertiary structure, protein complexes, and posttranslational modifications. Candidates should have a Ph.D. in analytical chemistry (mass spectrometry) or biochemistry (protein chemistry) or a related discipline.

Contact: Kenneth B. Tomer, Laboratory of Structural Biology, MD F0-03, 919-541-1966, fax: 919-558-7063, e-mail: tomer@niehs.nih.gov

Regulation of Lactoferrin Gene Expression (HNV 00-9)

A position is available immediately to investigate the regulation of lactoferrin gene expression in a tissue-specific manner and to participate in the generation of knockout mice. Candidates should have a strong molecular biology background. Knowledge of steroid hormone action and cell biology is desired. Applicants must have a Ph.D.

Contact: Christina Teng, Laboratory of Reproductive and Developmental Toxicology, MD E2-01, 919-541-0344, fax: 919-541-0696, e-mail: teng@niehs.nih.gov
COPYRIGHT 2000 National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2000, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Environmental Health Perspectives
Date:May 1, 2000
Words:3987
Previous Article:Fellowships, Grants, & Awards.
Next Article:New Books.


Related Articles
Specialists as professionals in research libraries: an overview of trends and an analysis of job announcements.
Announcement 93-144: early referral of issues to appeals and the role of appeals in the competent authority process.
Taxpayer involvement in competent authority process.
The Two Doors to the Community College Presidency.
QUALCOMM TO ACQUIRE SNAPTRACK INC. FOR ONE BILLION.
HOMEOWNERS FEDERATION BACKS VALLEY SECESSION.
New application system for Army CP11 Financial Management Careerists. (Professional Development).

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2019 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters