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Interview

Q: Do you and your father have nicknames for each other?

CATE: He calls me Catydid. He just started calling me that when I was a little girl, and he still calls me that. It never wore off.

Q: Would you consider your self Daddy's little girl? What kind of relationship do you have with your father?

CATE: I would definitely consider myself Daddy's little girl. We've always been really close.

Q: What was the most fun thing you did together while you were growing up?

CATE: He taught me how to water-ski and we would go inner-tubing.

Q: What is the funniest thing you've ever seen your dad do?

CATE: I'd have to say dance. He's really not a good dancer. I've made so much fun of him; now he just does it to entertain me. It's very funny!

Q: What is it about your father that you think makes him the right choice for President?

CATE: I think he's very optimistic. He really has a lot of hope for this country and for our future, which I think is important, especially for the youth.

Q: How do you react when you hear or read harsh criticism of your father?

CARE: Of course, it's hard to read that people disagree with things that your parents are doing, but nothing that anybody writes could change my opinion of my dad. Q: Why are you campaigning for your dad?

CATE: Because I believe in it, and I believe in what my dad's doing. I believe he would make an amazing President. I want to see someone like him in office, someone who can make my future brighter.

Story

Catherine "Cate" Edwards says she is definitely "Daddy's little girl." Her father, who is a candidate for the Democratic nomination for President, calls her "Catydid," a nickname he has used for as long as she can remember.

"He taught me how to water-ski, and we would go inner-tubing," Cate recalls about her childhood with her father, Senator John Edwards (D, N.C.).

Cate is now a 21-year-old senior at Princeton University in New Jersey. When she's not in class, she's campaigning for her father, one of several individuals hoping to win the Democratic Party's nomination for President. Cate thinks her father would be a great President.

"He really has a lot of hope for this country and for our future, which I think is important, especially for the youth," Cate says.

The hardest part about being this close to history, she adds, is hearing harsh criticism of her father.

"It's hard to read that people disagree with things that your parents are doing," she says, "but nothing that anyone writes could change my opinion of my dad."

To Cate, John Edwards is a fun and entertaining father who is not afraid to cut up or cut a rug. "He's really not a good dancer," she says. "I've made so much fun of him; now he just does it to entertain me. It's very funny!"

Cate supports her father 100 percent in his bid for the Democratic presidential nomination.

"I believe he would make an amazing President," Cate says. "I want to see someone like him in office, someone who can make my future brighter."
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Title Annotation:headline
Author:Velez, Evelyn
Publication:Junior Scholastic
Date:Feb 9, 2004
Words:542
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