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Poor Will's Countryside Almanack: late autumn and early winter of 2016.

THE SUN

Daylight Saving Time ends at 2 a.m. on November 6. Set docks back one hour. Winter solstice occurs at 5:44 a.m. (EST) on December 21, and on December 26, the sun starts its ascent toward June, shifting from a declination of 23 degrees and 26 minutes to 23 degrees and 25 minutes.
THE MOON OCTOBER--NOVEMBER: THE SECOND SPRING MOON

New moon                Oct 30:7:12 p.m.
2nd quarter             Nov 7:2:51 p.m.
3rd quarter (full moon) Nov 14:8:52 a.m.
4th quarter             Nov 21:3:33 a.m.

NOVEMBER-DECEMBER: THE BEDDING PLANT SEEDING MOON

New moon                Nov 29:7:18 a.m.
2nd quarter             Dec 7:4:03 a.m.
3rd quarter (full moon) Dec 13:7:06 p.m.
4th quarter             Dec 20:8:56 p.m.

DECEMBER: THE TUFTED TITMOUSE MOON

New moon Dec 29:1:53 a.m.


Limar Perigee (moon closest to Earth): November 14 and December 12

Lunar Apogee (moon farthest from Earth): November 27 and December 25

THE STARS

By midnight, the Pleiades and Taurus, winter's prophets, are almost directly overhead, Orion fully visible behind them. Regulus, the brightest star of spring, will be just starting to rise along the eastern tree line.

THE SHOOTING STARS

November 4-5: The Taurids (near Taurus)

November 17-18: The Leonids (in Leo)

December 7-17: The Geminids (in Gemini)

December 21-22: The Ursids (near the Big Dipper)

THE PLANETS

Venus is the evening star throughout November and December, sharing that role with Mars. Jupiter is the morning star. In late November, Saturn disappears from the evening sky, reappearing in the morning in the last week of December.

A CALENDAR OF HOLIDAYS AND SPECIAL OCCASIONS FOR FARMERS, RANCHERS AND HOMESTEADERS

November 7: Ecuadorian Independence Day

November 24: Thanksgiving

December 12: Muhammad's Birthday (Mawlid Al-Nabi) for Suni Muslims

December 17: Muhammad's Birthday (Mawlid Al-Nabi): Shia Muslims

December 24, 2016 to January 1, 2017: Hanukkah (Jewish Festival of Lights)

December 25: Christmas

METEOROLOGY

Cold waves usually cross the Mississippi River on or about the following dates: November 2, 6, 11, 16, 20, 24 and 28; December 2, 8, 15, 20, 25 and 29. If strong storms occur this month, weather patterns suggest that they will happen during the following periods: November 2-5, 14-16 and November 22-27; December 13, 24-26, 31-January 1. It is probable that new moons on October 30, November 29 and December 29, as well as full moons on November 14 and December 13 will bring stronger-than-average storms to the United States and Canada. Lunar perigee on November 14 and December 12 will strengthen the effects of the full moon.

THE ALMANACK DAYBOOK

NOVEMBER

1. Early bedding plant seeding for 2017 starts at new moon time (now). This is the week to prepare seeds and flats for May flower sales.

2. Under the dark, waxing moon, transplant perennials, shrubs and trees. Put in trees for summer shade and cash crops (a few years from now) during chilly, wet November and December afternoons.

3. Move the last of your gourd crop to market.

4. Paperwhite and amaryllis bulbs should be started now for holiday blooms.

5. Get your orchids ready for December sales.

6. Daylight Saving Time ends today at 2:00 a.m. The number of accidents often increases with the sudden change in sunset time.

7. Use lower grade supplements for your livestock early in November, gradually increasing nutrient value and quantity throughout the winter.

8. Add hand-made ornaments and other crafts to your stand at the farmers markets.

9. Hanukkah and Christmas in the last week of December offer opportunities to sell lambs and kids.

10. Plan for the Christmas tree harvest.

11. Christmas cacti, dried flower arrangements, grapevine wreaths, grasses, and forcing bulbs should sell briskly in the city as the holidays approach.

12. The cloudiest times of the year in most of the country come between November 6 and February 22, and less sun means slow drying for wet hay.

13. Market your poinsettia crop this week this week.

14. Full moon and lunar perigee today increase the likelihood of storms and bitter cold. Also, livestock, friends and family members may be harder to handle.

15. Wind speed and cloud cover reach winter levels.

16. Find and sell mistletoe once the leaves are down

17. Prepare to meet the holiday demand for honey.

18. Fertilize trees and shrubs after leaves have fallen.

19. The weak moon this week is expected to soften the cold fronts that arrive around Thanksgiving.

20. Market well-budded Christmas cacti right after Thanksgiving.

21. Cool weather pastures may not produce the kind of nutrition you need for your livestock, but introduce grain mix slowly.

22. Ten to 15 goats per acre is fine for summer. You may want to cut the numbers back as late autumn deepens.

23. Seed more bedding plants at new moon, the 29th.

24. Below-zero temperatures now become possible along and above the 40th Parallel.

25. Do late shearing, trim hair on goats, slaughter livestock, give vaccinations, treat for internal and external parasites under the dark moon.

26. Grazing ordinarily comes to a dose in northern pastures as November ends.

27. The last important high-pressure system of November arrives around the 28th, preceded by rain or snow three years out of four.

28. Lunar apogee on the 27th should counter the negative effects of today's new moon.

29. Rheumatism in humans and beasts increases during the cold and damp weather of winter, especially at full and new moon times. For some relief, try a tablespoonful of paprika and one of molasses per day.

DECEMBER

1. Small pots of herbs, attractively wrapped, complement your marketing efforts.

2. Cull livestock after pasture season ends.

3. Plan for the Hothouse Lamb marketing season that begins near Christmas.

4. When air comes in contact with fermented and pickled silage, mold forms on it.

5. Set up water warmers for pregnant livestock.

6. Check for harmful moisture condensation within your beehives.

7. Order your pasture seeds and schedule your pasture frost seeding for January and February.

8. Early winter, a three-week season that puts a definite end to the floral and pasture year in northern states, typically starts today and lasts until even colder conditions move in around New Year's day.

9. Consider heating stalls up to about 40 degrees at kidding and lambing time. Adequate heat is sometimes easier to provide than effective care when a newborn has been frozen.

10. Continue working on your intensive rotational grazing for next year, separating enough paddocks so that pasture can have a chance to grow back in a sequential fashion.

11. Mark for culling ewes and does that failed to rear their October and November offspring.

12. Heavy December snows may contribute to an increase in coyote attacks, since the snow may limit the number of mice they can catch.

13. Muslim holidays in mid-December may help you market kids and lambs.

14. A two-week period of relative calm before the turbulence of deep winter, sometimes called the Halcyon Days, begins today.

15. December lambs and kids may arrive during the moon's third quarter (the 13th through the 19th) even if they are not scheduled to be born at that time. Lunar lore suggests that more creatures give birth during the moon's third quarter than in any other quarter.

16. Don't forget to fatten weaner calves and piglets (and your pocketbook) with your extra goat milk this winter.

17. Place an entrance reducer in your hives to keep mice from coming in.

18. Save your best quality feed supplies for the colder months and the months closest to birthing time.

19. With proper planning, a smooth transition can be made between weaning kids and lambs, selling kids and lambs for the Easter Market, and the purchase of feeder animals like calves and piglets --a transition that might make November and December more profitable.

20. The December 20 high-pressure wave is the first of two "white-Christmas" fronts. Weak lunar position, however, may weaken that weather system this year.

21. In most states, average high temperatures fluctuate only about two to three degrees between December 21 and the approach of early spring in the third week of February.

22. If you are going to fatten piglets with your goat milk, you might want to have two pigs instead of just one. They like the company.

23. It's time to keep the Christmas greens away from pregnant ewes and does.

24. As you schedule estimated due dates for each of your pregnant animals, also do an estimated time of day for each, basing your assessment on the time of a doe or ewe's previous births or the time of day the animal's mother gave birth.

25. Lunar apogee today is expected to soften the Christmas cold front.

26. If you are going to show this month's newborn animals next year, it may make sense to feed them by hand now.

27. Winter generally brings the highest prices for goat milk; plan accordingly.

28. In most years, only 11 more severe cold fronts (seven in January, four in February) remain until the arrival of earliest spring.

29. The moon is new today, once again favoring the seeding of bedding plants for flowers and for March setting of cabbages, kale and collards.

30. Spring begins in Horida now, reaches the Deep South in February, the Carolinas in March, the Lower Midwest in April, the northern states in May.

31. The front that arrives at the end of the year is typically wet and windy

LUNAR FEEDING PATTERNS FOR PEOPLE AND BEASTS OLD

Best hunting and fishing should occur with the moon above the earth. The second-best time occurs with the moon below the earth.

DATE: ABOVE; BELOW

November 1-6: Afternoons; Midnight to Dawn

November 7-13: Evenings; Mornings

November 14-20: Midnight to Dawn; Afternoons

November 21-30: Mornings; Evenings

December 1-6: Afternoons; Midnight to Dawn

December 7-12: Evenings; Mornings

December 13-19: Midnight to Dawn; Afternoons

December 20-29: Mornings; Evenings

December 30-31: Afternoons; Midnight to Dawn

WINNERS OF THE SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER SCKRAMBLER SWEEPSTAKES

Prizes were promised to the 2nd, the 12th, the 27th, the 65th and the 139th persons who returned the correct answers by my deadline to Countryside. Out of the more than 80 respondents, Dorothy Fairbanks of Deer River, Minnesota, was the 2nd; Deborah Wolf of Delphi, Indiana, was the 12th; Leilani Peterson of Englewood, Colorado was the 27th; and Shelia Karen

Breeding of Boston, Virginia was the 65th.

ANSWERS TO THE SEPTEMBER-OCTOBER SCKRAMBLER

SEOUH

HOEM

DHSE

NARB

TOUGNIBLIUD

SEOUHTOU

VYRPI

SPTCIE SSTMYE

UINGBMPL

EEIIYLCTRCT

ACEFURN

SUINNIOTAL

EFRIOWOD

LCOA

LFUELIO

AUANTRL SGA

RMSTO WWNDSOI

TSORM ODORS

RETHEAW OROPG

KINGLCAU

HOUSE

HOME

SHED

BARN

OUTBUILDING

OUTHOUSE

PRIVY

SEPTIC SYSTEM

PLUMBING

ELECTRICITY

FURNACE

INSULATION

FIREWOOD

COAL

FUEL OIL

NATURAL GAS

STORM WINDOWS

STORM DOORS

INF

WEATHER PROOFING

CAULKING

THE NOVEMBER-DECEMBER SCKRAMBLER

The homesteader who is able to market to people who keep the following seasons, feast days and holidays should definitely be able to increase her/his income!

ESECHIN WEN REAY

IDRAM SARG

MANRO AETSRE

OOORTHDX AESTRE

PSSVREOA

MMEORIAL YAD

AOLBR AYD

SEFITLAV

LAJAMRA

ARUSHA

KKHHANUA

MARANAD

DI AL RETIF

RAHTSEV OONM

VANARATRI

ORSH HHHSNAAA

GTVTHANKSING

TMASCHSIR

If you are the 3rd, the 16th, the 34th or the 69th person to return your correct Sckrambler solutions to Poor Will, P.O. Box 431, Yellow Springs, OH 45387, you will win $5. There should be no typos in this puzzle, and no typo prize will be awarded.

Copyright 2016--W. L. Felker
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No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
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Title Annotation:Countryside :: ALMANACK
Author:Felker, W.L.
Publication:Countryside & Small Stock Journal
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Nov 1, 2016
Words:1917
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