Printer Friendly

Plagues, apocalypses, and bug-eyed monsters; how speculative fiction shows us our nightmares.

9780786429165

Plagues, apocalypses, and bug-eyed monsters; how speculative fiction shows us our nightmares.

Urbanski, Heather.

McFarland & Co.

2007

255 pages

$35.00

Paperback

PS648

Urbanski (Lehigh U.) analyzes the things that go bump in the night, whether on the page, at the flickers, or in our brains--from the sly nineteenth century naughtiness of Frankenstein to the full-out assault on reason of recent special-effects bonanzas. She evaluates the basic themes of speculative fiction and how they relate to modern human preoccupations, including technological threats such as nuclear war and berserk computers to innate fears of our own technology, nervousness about the power of the individual and the state, and the "others" who populate our movie screens and our nightmares.

([c]20072005 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR)
COPYRIGHT 2007 Book News, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2007 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Reference & Research Book News
Article Type:Book review
Date:May 1, 2007
Words:125
Previous Article:Acting teachers of America; a vital tradition.
Next Article:Straight talk about professional ethics.
Topics:


Related Articles
Gillespie, John T. & Naden, Corinne J. Teenplots; a booktalk guide to use with readers ages 12-18.
Rumors of war and infernal machines; technomilitary agenda-setting in American and English speculative fiction. (reprint, 2003).
The Book of Mary: A Novel.
Icons of horror and the supernatural; an encyclopedia of our worst nightmares; 2v.
Summer of the Apocalypse.
Guest editor's preface.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2021 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters