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Picasso's Three Musicians.

Do you like mysteries? Are you good at finding lost things? Help solve the mystery of the fourth figure.

Pablo Picasso was born in Spain but lived mostly in France. While he was painting scenery for a ballet company in Paris, the company moved to Naples, Italy. In Naples, Pablo became fascinated with the colorful costumes and music of people who performed on the street. He did a painting of three musicians which shows these bright costumes done in the style of Cubism.

Picasso and his friend, Georges Braque, invented Cubism. This kind of Cubism uses flat shapes and clear colors to make a picture. The guitar player in the center wears a bright costume of orange and yellow triangles.

The title of this painting tells you that there are three figures here, but are there? There are really four figures in Picasso's painting. Can you find all four? Where are they? Describe them.

To solve the mystery of the fourth figure, look on the floor under the table behind the musician on the left. Do you see the dog with his ears perked up and his mouth open. Maybe he is listening to the music. Maybe he is singing along.
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Title Annotation:painting by Pablo Picasso
Author:Nicely, H. T.
Publication:School Arts
Date:Apr 1, 1992
Words:201
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