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Phishing site looks almost identical to Libra's official website.

A phishing site that looks almost identical to the official website for Libra (LBR), a crypto-currency announced by Facebook on June 18, has already been set up to steal information from unwary investors.

A post on Reddit, an American social news aggregation and discussion website, claimed to offer a 25 percent bonus with a Libra pre-sale and provided a link to a phishing site that closely resembles the real one. The post has already been removed, but the fake website is still up and running.

The address of the official Libra website is 'www.calibra.com.' Calibra is the crypto-wallet for Libra, but the phishing site has changed the 'i' in Calibra into an accented 'i' that is easily missed at first glance. In addition, the button in the upper-right corner of the fake page says 'Pre-Sale Libra Currency,' while the button on the official page is labeled 'Get Started.'

After users click the button, they are asked to provide their Ethereum (ETH) address to complete the payment. However, this is just a scam to steal from users' crypto-wallet.

The exchange rate of 2ETH = 600LBR provided by the fake site is very close to the temporary official exchange rate of 1 LBR = 1 USD announced by Facebook. (The market price for Ethereum was 1 ETH = 330 USD when this article was written), making the scam look even more believable.

Facebook has not yet announced the exact launch date for Libra or the amount of the currency it will issue. To avoid being scammed, prospective investors should not believe any unofficial information.

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Publication:Taiwan News (Taipei, Taiwan)
Date:Jun 26, 2019
Words:308
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