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PVC price hikes under way.

PVC suppliers moved in unison to raise prices of suspension resins 2|cents~/lb effective November 1. At press time, they were trying again--this time for 2-3|cents~/lb on either December 1 or January 1.

Meanwhile, suppliers of HDPE resins are still aiming to implement as much as possible their last round of price increases issued in August and delayed over the last couple of months.

PVC GOING UP--AGAIN

Immediately removing 2|cents~/lb temporary voluntary allowances (TVAs) that were put in place in late August, PVC resin producers launched an effort to raise prices a further 2|cents~/lb or more. Occidental Chemical issued a 2|cents~/lb increase, effective December 1. Borden Chemicals & Plastics was reported to have taken similar action. And sources at Shintech Inc. confirmed that the company issued a 3|cents~/lb increase for January 1. It was generally expected that other major suppliers would follow suit.

PVC suppliers say the move is needed to halt price erosion and put some profitability back into the business. Producers have not been able to pass along their higher costs for raw materials, and profitability has suffered as well from competitive jousting for market share.

Selling prices for general-purpose homopolymer are in the 27-30|cents~/lb range, down from 28-31|cents~/lb earlier this year. Prices for pipe resin range from 23-24|cents~/lb, down from 25-26|cents~/lb.

HDPE HIKES MEET DELAYS

Full implementation of the last round of price increases on HDPE resins--generally 3|cents~/lb--had yet to take place by early November. This industrywide round of hikes was originally to have gone into effect August 1, but has been pushed back from month to month as a result of suppliers' over-capacity. (One consequence of this supply/demand imbalance is that Occidental Chemical will shut down its 250-million-lb/yr Orange, Texas, plant, one of the oldest in the industry, by year's end.)

Still, sources at major HDPE resin players say they had some success in pushing through part of those price hikes in October and were seeing some upward movement in November, although not across the board. Says one, "Those increases that some suppliers say they have been able to implement are not broad-based by any means. For example, in cases where we were able to get some sort of a price increase in October, we got about 1.5|cents~/lb."

Says another source, "This is the first time in history that prices of hexene and octene LLDPE film resins surpass prices of high-molecular-weight HDPE. As a result, we have seen some strengthening in demand for HMW-HDPE film resins, as some processors look to switch from the higher-priced LLDPE." Suppliers note that this inversion of normal pricing differentials may make it difficult to implement the most recent price increases on LLDPE and LDPE, which were to take effect in November.

PS & PET PRICES STABLE

Polystyrene resin prices have held relatively stable since suppliers' failed attempt to increase prices in late third quarter. Suppliers say the chance of another price initiative is slim, and if one were to emerge, industrywide support would be difficult to gain. Styrene monomer prices are on the way down and are expected to drop further in the near future. Thus, if resin producers can just hold onto current price levels for a while, their margins would tend to improve.

PET bottle resins are reportedly also holding stable despite an unexpectedly tight supply/demand balance early in the fourth quarter. Some significant new capacity will be brought on stream by late 1993 in North America and Europe. But suppliers expect demand to continue strong--in the double-digit growth range, balancing the additional supply.
Bulk(*) List & Market Prices Effective Mid-November
 LIST MARKET
RESIN GRADE(b) |cent~/LB |cent~/LB(b) |cent~/CU IN(b)
ABS
MED IMPACT 128-138 89-91 3.4
HI IMPACT 135-141 94-100 3.7
X-HI IMPACT 140-147 102-105 3.9
HI HEAT 132-155 117-121 4.7
PIPE 110-115 82-85 3.2
SHEET 95-105 87-90 3.4
TRANSPARENT 152-158 112-124 4.3
FITTINGS 102-107 94-97 3.7
PLATING 137-139 105-115 4.0
FLAME RET 138-161 122-130 5.7
STRUCT FM 120-126 103-107 NA(d)
10% GLASS 147-160 140-160 6.0-6.1
30% GLASS 143-156 136-156 6.0-7.2
ABS/PC ALLOY 148-154 145-150 6.0-6.1
ABS/PVC ALLOY 144-161 140-145 6.0-6.1
ABS/NYLON ALLOY 177-199 177-199 7.0-8.0
ACETAL
HOMOPOL 180-184 123-127 6.1-6.4
20% GLASS 183-197 142-150 7.9-8.4
COPOLYMER 180-184 123-127 6.1-6.4
25% GLASS 190-201 142-150 7.9-8.4
ACRYLIC
G-P 105 91-93 3.9-4.0
IMPACT 108-130 108-113 4.6-4.8
ACRYLONI-
TRILE COPOL
EXTRUSION 119 101-116 4.0-4.6
INJECTION 158 120-135 4.8-5.4
ALKYD 72-85 65-74 4.9-5.5
CELLULOSICS
ACETATE 156 156 NA(d)
CAB 154 154 NA(d)
CAP 154 154 NA(d)
DAP (G-P) 251-497 251-497 16.26-34.71
EPOXY
G-P RESIN 128-137 116-126 NA(d)
COMPOUNDS
C/B/T(e) 123-166 123-166 9.4-12.9
R/C/D(f) 208-271 208-271 15.3-20.1
SEMICONDUCTOR
NOVOLAC 193-228 193-228 13.1-15.9
ANHYDRIDE 188-268 188-268 13.9-19.2
EVA
INJECTION 84-110 60-95 2.4-4.0
FILM EXTRU 55-95 55-87 2.4-2.7
EVOH 241 241 10.0
FLUORO-
POLYMER
CTFE 3000 3000 237.6
ECTFE 1100 1100 70.1
ETFE 1230-1505 1230-1505 79.3-9.7
FEP 925-1090 925-1090 70.3-82.8
PFA 1830-2005 1830-2005 141-154.5
PTFE 640-720 570-640 45.0-51.0
PVDF 639-645 639-645 41.4-41.8
IONOMER 97-137 97-137 3.4-4.8
LIQUID-
CRYSTAL
POLYMERS
INJECTION
MIN FILLED 690-1035 690-1035 44.2-72.1
GLASS FILLED 715-1065 715-1065 50.5-100.4
CARBON FILLED 170-2000 1700-2000 83.2-138.6
EXTRUSION
UNFILLED 1200-2200 1200-2200 60.5-110.9
MELAMINE
MOLD
COMPOUND 95-103 90-94 5.5-5.6
MELAMINE/
PHENOLIC
COMPOUND 78-117 75-83 4.5-5.0
NYLON
TYPE 6 228-345 129-133 5.9
MN FILLED 170-177 122-130 6.3
30% GLASS 171-244 156-160 7.7
TYPE 66 240-241 136-143 6.5
MIN FILLED 175-195 123-127 6.3
30% GLASS 240-244 165-175 9.8
TYPE 69 255-280 250-276 9.7-10.7
TYPE 6/10 332 286-313 12.4-13.6
TYPE 612 341 286-327 11.4-13.2
30% GLASS 330 309-311 14.7
40% GLASS 328 309 14.7
TYPE 11 403 329-341 13.6-14.1
30% GLASS 415 331-350 15.0-15.8
40% GLASS 415 347-360 17.7-18.5
TYPE 12 392 318-341 12.1-13.0
30% GLASS 403 327-350 14.7-15.8
50% GLASS 400 299-340 15.6-17.8
TRANSPARENT
AMORPHOUS 365 247-360 10.3-15.0
PHENOLIC
MOLD COMP 62-100 55.5-87.5 2.8-4.0
REINFORCED GRADES 115-300 100.5-267.5 6.0-15.9
POLYAMIDE-
IMIDE
MODIFIED 1750 1750 95
UNMODIFIED 1900 1900 97
POLYARYLATE 225-280 200-280 8.8-12.3
POLYARYL-
SULFONE 440 440 21.8
POLYBUTYLENE
G-P 94-96 94-96 3.1
FILM 88-91 88-91 2.9
PIPE
COLD WATER 116-120 116-120 3.9-4.0
HOT WATER 162-166 162-166 5.5-5.6
POLYCAR-
BONATE
INJECTION 242-249 148-163 6.7
20% GLASS 240-329 178-190 8.9
30% GLASS 219-247 188-217 10.4
EXTRUSION 242-249 137-145 5.9
BLOW MOLD 184-262 150-170 6.7
STRUCT FOAM 222 159-181 NA(d)
20% GLASS 297 245-255 NA(d)
FR 255-289 176-197 8.2
CD 281 185-200 9.6
POLYESTER (TP)
PBT TYPE
UNFILLED 164-175 143-150 6.9
HHMP 195-205 154-165 7.6
30% GLASS, FR 170-190 165-187 10.0
STRUCT FOAM 165-170 159-165 NA(d)
PET
BOTTLE (RAILCAR) 68-70 64-67 3.6
MOD PET
30% GLASS 176 132-143 7.4
55% GLASS 200 148-155 9.8
30% GLASS,
FLAME RET 230 147-157 9.2
PETG COPOL 98 98 4.5
POLYESTER
THERMOSET
G-P ORTHO 65-76 52-57 NA(d)
ISOPHTHALIC 70-78 55-60 NA(d)
BIS-A 115-145 115-145 NA(d)
PEEK 2300 2300 109.3
30% GLASS 2000 2050 110.0
POLYETHER-
IMIDE 465 465 21.5
30% GLASS 380 380 19.8
POLYETHER-
KETONE (PEK) 2950 2950 130.1
30% GLASS 2600 2600 153
POLYETHER-
KETONE (PEK) 2950 2950 130.1
30% GLASS 2600 2600 153
POLYETHER-
SULFONE 440 440 22.0
30% GLASS 365 365 21.0
POLYETHYLENE
(RAILCAR)
LDPE
G-P MOLDING
& EXTRU 55-60 40-42 1.4
INJECTION 55-60 40-42 1.4
LID RESIN 55-60 41-43 1.4
LINER 55-60 37-39 1.3
CLARITY 55-60 39-41 1.3
EXTRU COATG 55-60 39-40 1.3
BLOW MOLD 67-80 44-47 1.5
ROTOMOLD,
PELLET 70-80 41-45 1.4
POWDER 70-80 47-52 1.6
LLDPE,
BUTENE-
BASED
G-P MOLDING 55-60 35-36 1.2
FILM 55-60 34-36 1.2
BLOW MOLD 70-75 41-44 1.4
ROTOMOLD 70-75 41-45 1.4
LLDPE,
HAO-BASED
G-P MOLDING 63-67 36-38 1.3
LID RESIN 63-67 40-42 1.4
FILM 63-67 35-38 1.2
MMW-HDPE
G-P INJ MOLD 60-63 35-37 1.2
FILM 60-63 36-38 1.3
BLOW MOLD 60-63 35-37 1.2
HMW-HDPE
BLOW MOLDING 60-63 35-37 1.2
FILM 60-63 35-37 1.2
PIPE 63-67 47-51 1.6
UHMW-PE 110-125 95-120 3.6-3.7
PPE/PPO-
BASED RESIN
INJECTION 140-220 116-139 4.9-5.6
20% GLASS 214-226 170-207 7.4-9.9
30% GLASS 200-220 214-274 10.5-10.9
EXTRUSION 170-240 150-181 5.8-7.0
STRUCT FM 164-175 125-137 NA(d)
PPS
40% GLASS 313-330 295-313 15.5-18.3
20% GLASS/
35% FILLER 157 150-159 11.1-12.3
35% GLASS/
35% FILLER 197 147-149 10.1-11.5
POLY-
PROPYLENE
(RAILCAR)
G-P HOMOPOL
INJECTION 55-60 36-38 1.2
EXTRUSION
FIBER 55-60 35.37 1.2
PROFILES 55-60 40-42 1.3
RANDOM COPOL
BLOW MOLDING 60-65 43-45 1.4
FILM 60-65 44-46 1.4
INJECTION 60-65 43-45 1.4
IMPACT COPOL
MED IMP 58-70 49-51 1.6
HI IMP 70-84 52-55 1.7
SUPER HI IMP 58-70 57-60 1.9
POLYSTYRENE
(RAILCAR)
G-P CRYSTAL 60-66 45-47 1.7
HI HEAT 63-66 46-49 1.7
HIPS 66-68 52-55 1.7
HI HEAT 66-68 50-53 1.8
FR 91-95 74-77 3.1
STRUCT FM 100-105 66-69 NA(d)
EPS
UNMODIFIED 79 57-59 NA(d)
MODIFIED 81 55-56 NA(d)
POLYSULFONE 392 392 17.5
10% GLASS 383 383 18.4
30% GLASS 331 331 17.8
POLYURE-
THANE (TP)
ESTER TYPE 168-215 168-215 7.5-9.3
ETHER TYPE 283-304 231-243 10.0-10.5
PU
ISOCYANATES
POLYMERIC MDI 105-110 90-96 NA(d)
80/20 TDI 125-141 90-100 NA(d)
PVC RESIN
(RAILCAR)
G-P HOMOPOL 37-38 28-31 NA(d)
PIPE 36-37 27-29 NA(d)
FILM 39-40 31-32 NA(d)
COPOLYMER
FLOORING 57 45-48 NA(d)
DISPERSION
HOMOPOLY 74 58-61 NA(d)
COPOLYMER 74 63-68 NA(d)
CPVC PIPE
COMPOUND 137 118 NA(d)
PVDC
EXTRUDABLE 153 118-128 7.0-7.5
SILICONES
MOLD. COMP. 581-640 581-640 38.1-39.3
SPECIALTY GR. 891-3148 891-3148 NA(d)
SILICONE/EPOXY 339-343 339-343 22.5-22.8
STYRENE-
ACRYLIC 112-118 108-112 3.7-4.0
SAN (G-P) 97 85-88 3.3
STYRENE
MALEIC
ANHYDRIDE
G-P 115-120 110-115 4.2-4.3
HI IMP 149-179 130-140 4.2-4.5
FR 185-189 175-183 6.7-7.0
TP ELASTOMERS
OLEFINIC 95-115 70-76 2.4
POLYAMIDE 287-337 287-337 10.4-12.3
POLYESTER 245-310 200-310 8.8-13.6
STYRENIC 63-350 83-237 2.9-8.3
UREA MOLDING
COMPOUND
BLACK & BROWN 67-78 67-78 3.6-4.1
WHITE & IVORY 72 72 3.8
VINYL ESTER
COR RES 144 144 NA(d)
HEAT & COR RES 158 158 NA(d)
KEY
Colored areas indicate pricing activity. An arrow (|up arrow~)
indicates direction of price change.
*Truckload, unless otherwise specified.
aUnfilled, natural color, unless otherwise specified.
bBased on sampling of processors.
cBased on typical or average density.
dNot applicable.
eFor coils, bushings, transformers; novolac and anhydride
grades.
fFor resistors, capacitors, diodes, novolac and anhydride
grades.
COPYRIGHT 1992 Gardner Publications, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1992, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

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Title Annotation:polyvinyl chloride
Publication:Plastics Technology
Date:Dec 1, 1992
Words:1921
Previous Article:Upturn slowed in third quarter.
Next Article:Mathematical modeling saves part inspection.
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