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PUBLIC FORUM : MTA EFFORT `WISHY-WASHY'.

Re ``MTA taking stand against unruly riders,'' Daily News, Jan. 28:

All I can say is it's certainly about time, but what a wishy-washy approach! Over the years there have been times when it would have been cheaper and less stressful to take the bus to work, but unless it was an emergency, I drove instead, and only had to look at some of the other passengers to justify my actions.

Too often the seats are filthy. Not only are children allowed to stand on them, but a number of so-called adults put their dirty shoes up on them too. When I was forced by circumstances to rely on the bus for several months some years ago, I had to carry an old blanket to sit on to protect my clothing.

The part of the story where the driver is quoted as saying, ``Don't you know you're expected not to play your radio so loudly?'' really caught my attention. The last time I rode a bus, pictures of a radio, food and a drink container with a line drawn through them were displayed conspicuously for those who couldn't read, obviously advising that these things were not allowed on the bus. Turn the radio down? Turn it off.

I don't know what the solution is, but somebody at the MTA had better find one and make it a priority if they expect people to use this mode of transportation.

Perhaps instead of putting $150,000 into training bus drivers in handling unruly riders, it would be more sensible to hire security personnel to ride shotgun - literally, in some cases - to protect those who are responsible citizens who, for whatever reason, have to depend on riding the bus, and teach the many children and adults who abuse the bus why they shouldn't.

- Anita Work

Sylmar

L.A. doesn't need Cardenas

Thank you for your fine Jan. 28 editorial ``Tony, please come home.'' The editorial really laid it on the line, and it is obvious where Assemblyman Tony Cardenas' heart lies.

We don't need his type in the Los Angeles political arena. It is now up to the constituents of the Panorama City Democrat to vote him out.

- Spart Galieti

Northridge

Cardenas vital to community

I was disappointed to see how quick the Daily News was to attack and assign motives to Assemblyman Tony Cardenas' acceptance of American Indian gaming contributions.

Those of us who live and work in the community see it quite differently. Cardenas is from the community, in the community and for the community. We have no doubt about where his heart is. He has proven himself to us many times over.

The reality of term limits necessitates an accelerated plan of action to maximize a legislator's term in office. All Cardenas has done is position himself to better serve the citizens of California ``at home'' and throughout the state.

The only fair way to evaluate his motives is to wait and see what he accomplishes during his remaining time in office and how these funds are utilized. I believe history will show that your slant on this matter was totally off base.

- Joe Lucente

Co-director

Felton Avenue Charter School

Lake View Terrace

Observatory ready to grow

The Daily News was very helpful by providing a current accounting of the status of the 1996 Proposition K funds for the Los Angeles Department of Recreation and Parks (``Council pet projects ace out Valley parks,'' Daily News, Jan. 31).

I'd like to remind your readers that Griffith Observatory was specifically designated in that proposition for $10 million. In addition, all three of the regional Volunteer Oversight Committees have agreed that Griffith Observatory is one of the highest priorities.

The observatory is in a position to maximize these Proposition K revenues, and bring this extraordinary building into the 21st century, with up-to-date exhibits and a state-of-the-art planetarium theater.

- Joy Picus

President

Friends of the Observatory

Animal imports bad for state

While the California Fish and Game Department's proposed ban on frog and turtle imports for live-animal food markets sounds like a very pointed debate, involving a specific pocket of merchants and animal-welfare advocates, concern should not only be reserved for those mentioned. On the contrary, it is an issue that affects each and every resident of California.

The importation of millions of turtles and frogs from other states depletes that state's native species population and threatens its ecosystem, while subsequently posing a danger to the native species and ecosystem of California.

The conditions under which these live animals are transported and handled are shameful. In many cases, the mistreatment violates animal-cruelty codes.

As a net result, the practice of importation puts the health of the imported animal, any native animal that has come in contact and every resident of California in jeopardy. The time has come for the Fish and Game Department to recognize its civic and societal responsibilities and support the ban.

- Madeline Bernstein

President

Los Angeles Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals

End apathy; join local PTSA

The article regarding Gov. Gray Davis' education initiative (``Legislature's special session to focus on educational reforms,'' Daily News, Jan. 19) made me appear to be contradicting myself.

In the article, I bemoaned the fact that many schools have let their Parent Teacher Student Associations dwindle to four or five members in a school of thousands. It was not a criticism of those four or five who are valiantly struggling on, but of the apathy that leaves them with all the work.

This district and its students will not thrive until our PTSAs districtwide once again become vibrant and active with new ideas and creative input.

Please encourage your readers to join their neighborhood PTSA, as it is one of the most critical factors in the success or failure of a school.

- David Tokofsky

Member,

Los Angeles Board of Education

Nature preserve needs help

Re ``DWP commissioner's absence scrubs land-use hearing; Chatsworth Reservoir meeting delayed till March,'' Daily News, Jan. 21:

Under my leadership, the Santa Susana Mountains Park Association and many others collected 2,967 signatures in 2-1/2 weeks on petitions supporting the retention of the Chatsworth Nature Preserve and Reservoir as a nature preserve via a 10-year lease to the Santa Monica Mountains Conservancy for its management.

Accordingly, I have written four letters that summarize the plants, animals and archeology, and passive activities at the preserve; document damage to oak trees and other environmentally insensitive actions by the Department of Water and Power to show that it is not qualified to maintain the preserve; outline the requirements for changes needed to implement athletic fields; and suggest to Councilman Mike Feuer that he supplement his report on the Department of Recreation and Parks facilities for girls' athletics with information about the other publicly owned facilities such as Pierce and Valley community colleges and junior and senior high schools for after-school and weekend youth athletics.

I hope my submittals will be considered. Unfortunately, the City Council cannot require the DWP commission to do anything, but it can veto any changes from the present status of the nature preserve.

- Dorian Keyser

Lands Committee chairwoman

Santa Susana Mountains Park Association

Tarzana

`Airport crisis' cure simple

I have a simple solution to the longtime controversy going on between Glendale and Burbank regarding the airport crisis:

Allow the Burbank City Council to inform the airlines that the new flight hours will be from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. During those hours, instruct the airlines to take off and land over the city of Glendale but fly no higher than 1,000 feet for a period of one month.

This procedure would have saved $14,000 in mailings and a lot of wasted time arguing with the Glendale City Council. I assure you the residents of Glendale will react immediately and positively. All this at no cost to Burbank taxpayers.

- Ray Hillebrand

Burbank

Illegal immigration still bad

The article ``Davis on mission to Mexico'' (Daily News, Jan. 31) states as fact that Californians ``are relaxing their attitudes toward immigration'' and cites some poll by the Public Policy Institute of California that claims most Californians believe Mexican immigration - legal or illegal - is more benefit than burden.

Well, excuse me, but who are these people talking to? Surely not anyone I know.

I'm just as much against illegal immigration as I was two years ago. Has the definition of ``illegal'' changed? How come President Clinton is being put through the moral wringer for so-called illegal acts, but it's not only OK for Mexico to keep flooding our state with illegal immigrants, but we're supposed to welcome them with open arms?

In the polls I've read about, even legal immigrants are against illegal immigration.

California has a population growth crisis that will benefit no one and threatens to place an incredible burden on all resources and services. Immigration and high birthrates of immigrants are the biggest facotr. Trade, si. Illegal immigration, no.

- Jan Brown

Van Nuys

CAPTION(S):

photo

PHOTO David Jones, a 15-year MTA bus driver who has been trained to deal with unruly passengers, picks up riders on Cahuenga Boulevard in Studio City.

Charlotte Schmid-Maybach/Special to the Daily News
COPYRIGHT 1999 Daily News
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1999, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

 
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Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Article Type:Editorial
Date:Feb 4, 1999
Words:1534
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