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PSM explanatory notes.

Preface
Appendix B. Explanatory Notes
 1. Overview
 A. The Energy Information Administration's Quality Guidelines
 B. Concepts of Product Supply and Demand
 C. Components of Supply and Demand
 (1.) Supply
 (2.) Disposition
 (3.) Ending Stocks
 2. Components--Forms Discussions
 A. Petroleum Supply Reporting System
 B. Monthly Supply Survey Description and Methodology
 (1.) Description of Survey Forms
 (2.) Frame
 (3.) Collection
 (4.) Processing and Micro Editing
 (5.) Estimation and Imputation
 (6.) Macro Editing
 (7.) Dissemination
 C. Derived Data
 (1.) Domestic Crude Oil Production
 (2.) Exports
 (3.) Stocks of Crude Oil on Leases
 (4.) Trans-Akaska Pipeline System (TAPS) Natural Gas Plant
 Liquids (NGPL) Adjustment
 (5.) Finished Motor Gasoline Adjustment
 (6.) Motor Gasoline Blending Components Adjustment
 (7.) Renewable Fuels including Fuel Ethanol Adjustment
 (8.) Distillate Fuel Oil Adjustment
 (9.) Crude Oil Adjustment
 (10.) Other Hydrocarbon Adjustment
 (11.) Hydrogren Adjustment
 (12.) Oxygenates (excluding fuel ethanol) Adjustment
 3. Quality
 A. General Discussion
 (1.) Response Rates
 (2.) Non-sampling Errors
 (3.) Resubmissions
 (4.) Revision Policy
 B. Data Assessment
 4. Provisions Regarding Disclosure of Information

Table B1. Finished Motor Gasoline Product Supplied and Gasoline Supply
Added by Ajudstments to Motor Gasoline Blending Components and Fuel
Ethanol


Preface

The Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) is the monthly component of a series of three publications concerning the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products produced by the Petroleum Division of the Energy Information Administration (EIA). The other two components are the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR) and the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA). Together these publications present a comprehensive snapshot of petroleum supply data on a weekly, monthly and yearly basis.

Data presented in the PSM describe the supply and disposition of petroleum products in the United States and major U.S. geographic regions. The data series describe production, imports and exports, inter-Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District movements, and inventories by the primary suppliers of petroleum products in the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia). The reporting universe includes those petroleum sectors in primary supply: petroleum refiners, motor gasoline blenders, operators of natural gas processing plants and fractionators, inter-PAD District transporters, importers, and major inventory holders of petroleum products and crude oil. When aggregated, the data reported by these sectors approximately represent the consumption of petroleum products in the United States.

The PSM tables present statistics for the most current month available as well as year-to-date. In most cases, the statistics are presented for several geographic areas--the United States (50 States and the District of Columbia), five PAD Districts, and 12 Refining Districts. At the U.S. and PAD District level, the total volume and the daily rate of activities are presented. The statistics are developed from monthly survey forms submitted by respondents to the EIA and from data provided from other sources.

Final statistics for the data series published in the PSM are published in the PSA. The PSA is published approximately five months after the end of the report year.

New in 2010

Several publication changes were implemented beginning with data for January 2010 PSM. The 2010 changes to the PSM include:

* added a new table to consolidate crude oil data

* removed certain crude oil details included in the new crude oil table from existing supply and disposition tables,

* changed motor gasoline product categories

** Motor gasoline blending components, refomulated blended with ether and reformulated blended with alcohol were collapsed into a single category: Reformulated blendstock (RBOB);

** Motor gasoline blending components, reformulated and conventional gasoline treated as clendstock (GTAB) categories were collapsed into a single category: GTAB;

** Finished motor gasoline, refolumated blended with ether and reformulated blended with alcohol were collapsed into a single category: Reformulated blended with fuel ethanol;

** Finished motor gasoline, conventional blended with fuel ethanol was split into two seperate categories: Ed55 and lower and Greater than Ed55.

* changed gasoline adjustment calculations including elimination of the MTBE adjustment,

* added gains and losses at blending terminals to applicable tables

* changed various product labels.

1. Overview

A. The Energy Information Administration's Quality Guidelines

The data contained in the Petroleum Supply Monthly (PSM) are subject to separate information quality guidelines issued by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the Department of Energy (DOE), and Energy Information Administration (EIA). With available resources, EIA continually works to improve its systems in order to provide high quality information needed by public and private policymakers and decision makers. EIA has performance standards to ensure the quality (i.e., objectivity, utility, and integrity) of information it disseminates to the public. Quality is ensured and maximized at levels appropriate to the nature and timeliness of the disseminated information. Information about EIA's quality program is available at http://www.eia.doe.gov/smg/EIA-IQ-Guidelines.html.

B. Concepts of Product Supply and Demand

Petroleum supply estimates contained in the PSM are often interpreted as an approximation of petroleum demand measured as product supplied. Product supplied is often called "implied" demand because it is a measure of demand that is implied by disappearance of petroleum products from facilities and activities in the "primary" supply chain. Facilities and activities in the primary supply chain include refineries and blending terminals, gas processing plants and fractionators, oxygenate producers, imports, exports, bulk storage terminals, and pipelines. Total product supplied in the PSM at the U.S. level is equal to the sum of field production, plus refinery and blender net production, plus renewable fuels, and oxygenate plant net production, plus imports, plus adjustments, minus stock change, minus refinery and blender net inputs, minus exports. Net receipts are added as a component of supply at the PAD District level. Crude oil product supplied is normally zero because crude oil is processed in refineries and rarely, if ever, used directly.

The secondary system is that portion of the overall distribution network that falls between producers and end-users. Product typically flows in bulk from the primary supply system into the secondary system before delivery in small quantities to consumers (the tertiary system). The secondary system includes storage at bulk plants; at retail motor fuel outlets, such as service stations, truck stops, and convenience stores; and at retail fuel oil dealers. Bulk plants are wholesale storage facilities that have less than 50,000 barrels of storage capacity and, by definition, receive product only by tank car or truck, not by barge, tanker, or pipeline. Tertiary inventories are held by end users and include fuel in vehicle tanks, heating oil in residential tanks, fuel oil held by utilities, jet fuel stored in facilities operated by end users, and certain proprietary storage of raw materials for the chemical industry (ethylene, propylene, etc.).

Data users sometimes consider demand as sales to the ultimate consumer or as the actual consumption of the product. Since there may be time delays between the movement of product into the primary market and its ultimate purchase or consumption, these definitions of demand require data on changes in secondary and/or tertiary stocks or the assumption that these values either remain constant or are small compared to primary supply. The most recent study of secondary stocks was done by the National Petroleum Council in 1989. This study revealed that secondary distillate stocks were equal to about 6.9 percent of distillate stocks and 6.7 percent of distillate storage capacity. The study also noted that secondary storage capacity was decreasing due to EPA regulations.

C. Components of Supply and Disposition

The detailed statistics tables in the PSM provide complete supply and disposition information for the current month and year to date. The tables are organized to locate National and Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District supply and disposition data at the front followed by tables that contain detailed information on supply and disposition. These include tables on crude oil and petroleum product production, import/export data, stocks information, and lastly, data on crude oil and petroleum product movements. To assist in the interpretation of these tables, the following discussion of supply, disposition, and ending stocks as shown in Tables 1-25 is provided. The categories and products are defined in the EIA Glossary.

(1.) Supply

a. Field Production--Total Field Production is the sum of crude oil producion and natural gas plant liquids and liquefied refinery gases production.

Crude oil production is an estimate based on data received from State conservation agencies and the Mineral Management Service of the U.S. Department of the Interior. Refer to "Domestic Crude Oil Production" in Section 2C (1) for further details.

Field production of natural gas plant liquids is reported on Form EIA-816 and published on a net basis (i.e., production minus inputs).

b. Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production Total Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production is reported on Form EIA-819. It is the sum of the production from plants producing oxygenates (fuel ethanol, ETBE, MTBE, and other oxygenates) plus negative production of pentanes plus, finished motor gasoline, and motor gasoline blending components added to fuel ethanol as denaturants. Negative production will occur when the amount of a product produced during the month is less than the amount of that same product that is reported as input during the same month.

c. Refinery and Blender Net Production--Refinery and Blender Net Production is reported on Form EIA-810 and EIA815. Refinery and Blender Net Production equals refinery and blenders production minus refinery and blender net inputs. Negative production of finished petroleum products will occur when the amount of a product produced during the month is less than the amount of that same product that is reprocessed (input) or reclassified to become another product during the same month.

d. Imports--Imports include receipts of goods into the 50 States and the District of Columbia from U.S. possessions and territories or from foreign countries.

e. Net Receipts--Net Receipts data are included in tables containing PAD District-level data to account for inter-PAD District movements of crude oil and petroleum products. Net receipts for a PAD District are calculated by subtracting shipments out of the PAD District from receipts into the PAD District. Net Movements of Crude Oil and Petroleum Products by Pipeline, Tanker, and Barge between PAD Districts are shown in Table60.

Data for inter-PAD District movements of fuel ethanol and oxygenates by railroad tank car are not currently available. Net Receipts are therefore "implied" for fuel ethanol and oxygenates. Implied net receipts are calculated as the sum of stock change, refinery and blender net inputs, and exports minus the sum of Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production, Imports, and Adjustments."

f. Adjustments--This column includes adjustment quantities for crude oil, fuel ethanol, motor gasoline blending components, and distillate fuel oil. Adjustment quantities are derived either to balance supply and disposition for selected products or to reclassify one product to another product. Product supplied is the balancing item for most products and is interpreted as an implied measure of petroleum demand. Adjustments are used in cases where it does not make sense to interpret the balancing item as demand. Reclassifications reported in the adjustments column may be implied by the supply and disposition balance or reported on surveys. Recall that supply at the U.S. level is equal to the sum of field production, renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production, refinery and blender net production, imports, and adjustments. Disposition at the U.S. level is equal to the sum of stock change, refinery and blender net inputs, exports, and products supplied. At the PAD District level, supply components include net receipts equal to gross receipts from other PAD Districts minus gross shipments to other PAD Districts. In every case, supply must equal disposition. Applicable components of supply and disposition vary depending on the product or product group. Unless otherwise noted in Section 2C, adjustment calculations that balance supply and disposition equal disposition minus supply for the U.S. and for each PAD District.

(2.) Disposition

a. Stock Change--Stock Change is calculated as the difference between the current month Ending Stocks column and the Ending Stocks column in the prior month's publication. A negative number indicates a decrease in stocks and a positive number indicates an increase in stocks.

b. Refinery and Blender Net Inputs--Refinery and Blender Net Inputs are inputs of crude oil and intermediate materials (unfinished oils, motor and aviation gasoline blending components, liquefied petroleum gases, pentanes plus, hydrogen, oxygenates, renewable fuels, and other hydrocarbons) that are processed at refineries or blended at terminals to produce finished petroleum products.

Crude oil input represents total crude oil (domestic and foreign) input to atmospheric crude oil distillation units and other refinery processing units (i.e., catalytic cracking units, cokers).

Inputs of natural gas plant liquids are refinery input of natural gas liquids received from natural gas plants for blending and processing. Published inputs of natural gas plant liquids are reported on a gross basis.

Inputs of unfinished oils, motor gasoline blending components, and aviation gasoline blending components are published on a net basis (i.e., refinery input minus refinery production). Negative inputs of unfinished oils and motor and aviation gasoline blending components will occur when the amount of a product produced during the month is greater than the amount of that same product that is input or reclassified to become another product during the same month.

c. Exports--Exports include shipments from the 50 States and the District of Columbia to Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, other U.S. possessions and territories and to foreign countries.

d. Products Supplied--Products supplied is equal to field production, plus renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production, plus refinery and blender net production, plus imports, (plus net receipts on a PAD District basis), plus adjustments, minus stock change, minus refinery and blender net inputs, minus exports.

A product supplied value indicates those quantities of petroleum products supplied for domestic consumption. Occasionally, the result for a product is negative because total disposition of the product exceeds total supply. Negative product supplied may occur for a number of reasons: (1) product reclassification has not been reported; (2) data were misreported or reported late; (3) in the case of calculations on a PAD District basis, the figure for net receipts was inaccurate because the coverage of inter-PAD movements was incomplete; and (4) products such as gasoline blending components and unfinished oils have entered the primary supply channels with their production not having been reported, e.g., streams returned to refineries from petrochemical plants.

Beginning with data for January 2010, product supplied for crude oil is assumed equal to zero. Prior to January 1983, crude oil burned on leases and by pipelines as fuel was reported as either distillate or residual fuel oil and was included in product supplied for these products. From January 1983 through December 2009, crude oil product supplied was equal to crude oil used directly as reported on Form EIA-813 "Monthly Crude Oil Report." Reporting of crude oil used directly was discontinued on Form EIA-813 after December 2009.

(3.) Ending Stocks

Ending stocks are primary stocks of crude oil and petroleum products held in storage as of 12 midnight on the last day of the month. Primary stocks include crude oil or petroleum products held in storage at (or in) leases, refineries, natural gas processing plants, pipelines, tank farms, and bulk terminals that can store at least 50,000 barrels of petroleum products or that can receive petroleum products by tanker, barge, or pipeline. Crude oil that is in-transit by water from Alaska, or that is stored on Federal leases or in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve is included. Primary Stocks exclude stocks of foreign origin that are held in bonded warehouse storage. Primary stocks of petroleum products also exclude secondary stocks held by dealers and jobbers and tertiary stocks held by consumers. Inventories classified as "Distillate Fuel Oil--Greater than 0.05 percent sulfur" stored in the Northeast Heating Oil Reserve are not considered to be in the commercial sector and therefore are excluded from distillate fuel oil ending stocks. The data are shown in Appendix D, Northeast Heating Oil Reserve.

2. Components--Forms Discussions

The data presented in the PSM include data collected by the EIA on eight monthly petroleum supply surveys, export data obtained from the U. S. Bureau of the Census, and crude production data obtained from State conservation agencies and the Minerals Management Service of the U. S. Department of Interior.

A. Petroleum Supply Reporting System

The eight monthly petroleum supply surveys are part of the Petroleum Supply Reporting System (PSRS). The PSRS tracks the supply and disposition of crude oil, petroleum products, and natural gas liquids in the United States. The PSRS is organized into two data collection subsystems: the Weekly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (WPSRS) and the Monthly Petroleum Supply Reporting System (MPSRS). The WPSRS processes the data from the seven weekly surveys. The MPSRS includes eight monthly surveys and one annual survey. The survey forms that comprise the PSRS are:

1. EIA-800, "Weekly Refinery Report,"

2. EIA-801, "Weekly Bulk Terminal Report,"

3. EIA-802, "Weekly Product Pipeline Report,"

4. EIA-803, "Weekly Crude Oil Stocks Report,"

5. EIA-804, "Weekly Imports Report,"

6. EIA-805, "Weekly Terminal Blender Report,"

7. EIA-809, "Weekly Oxygenate Report,"

8. EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report,"

9. EIA-812, "Monthly Product Pipeline Report,"

10. EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report,"

11. EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report,"

12. EIA-815, "Monthly Terminal Blender Report."

13. EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report"

14. EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report"

15. EIA-819, "Monthly Oxygenate Report"

16. EIA-820, "Annual Refinery Report."

Both weekly and monthly surveys are administered at six key points along the petroleum production and supply chain: (1) refineries, fractionators, and gas processing plants, (2) bulk terminals and blenders, (3) crude oil and product pipelines, (4) crude oil stock holders, (5) importers, and (6) oxygenate plants. Monthly surveys also include inter-PAD District movements by pipelines, tankers, and barges. Weekly surveys do not capture petroleum movements.

Data collected weekly using Forms EIA-800 through EIA-805 and EIA-809 are similar to, though less detailed than, the data collected monthly using Forms EIA-810, EIA-812 through EIA-815 and 819. Respondents reporting to the weekly surveys constitute a sample of those reporting on the monthly surveys.

Annual U.S. refinery capacity data are collected on the Form EIA820, "Annual Refinery Report." The EIA-820 data are published in the annual "Refinery Capacity Report."

B. Monthly Supply Survey Description and Methodology (1.) Description of Surveys Forms

Copies of the survey forms and instructions can be found at: http://www.eia.doe.gov/oil_gas/petroleum/survey_forms/pet_ survey_forms.html

The Form EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report," collects data on refinery input and capacity, sulfur content and API gravity of crude oil, and data on supply (beginning stocks, receipts, and production) and disposition (inputs, shipments, fuel use and losses, and ending stocks) of crude oil and refined products. Working and shell storage capacity for selected products is collected on a semi-annual basis.

The Form EIA-812, "Monthly Product Pipeline Report," collects data on end-of-month stocks and movements of petroleum products transported by pipeline. Intermediate movements for pipeline systems operating in more than two PAD Districts are included. Product pipeline tank storage capacity for selected products is collected on a semi-annual basis.

The Form EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report," collects data on end-of-month stock levels of crude oil held at pipeline and tank farms (associated with the pipelines) and terminals operated by the reporting company. Also, crude oil consumed by pipelines and on leases as pump fuel, boiler fuel, etc., is reported. Data are reported on a PAD District basis. Total Alaskan crude oil stocks in-transit by water (including stocks held at transshipment terminals between Alaska and the continental United States) to the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, and the Virgin Islands are also reported by the transporting company having custody of the stocks. InterPAD District movements of crude oil by pipeline are collected by the shipping and receiving PAD District. Intermediate movements for pipeline systems operating in more than two PAD Districts are not included. Crude oil storage capacity of tank farms is collected on a semi-annual basis.

The Form EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report," collects data on imports of crude oil and petroleum products (1) into the 50 States and the District of Columbia, (2) into Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and other U.S. possessions (Guam, Midway Islands, Wake Island, American Samoa, and Northern Mariana Islands), and (3) from Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, and other U.S. possessions into the 50 States and the District of Columbia. Imports into Foreign Trade Zones located in the 50 States and the District of Columbia are considered imports into the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

The type of commodity, port of entry, country of origin, quantity (thousand barrels), sulfur percent by weight, API gravity, and name and location of the processing or storage facility are reported. Sulfur percent by weight is requested for crude oil, crude oil burned as fuel, and residual fuel oil only. API gravity is requested for crude oil only. The name and location of the processing or storage facility is requested for crude oil, unfinished oils, and gasoline blending components only.

The Form EIA-815, "Monthly Terminal Blender Report," collects data on the operations of all bulk terminals located in the 50 States, District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U. S. possessions. Beginning and end-of-month stocks, receipts, inputs, production, shipments, and fuel use and losses during the month are collected from operators of terminals. Working and shell storage capacity is collected on a semi-annual basis.

The Form EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report," collects data on the operations of natural gas processing plants and fractionators. Beginning and end-of-month stocks, receipts, inputs, production, shipments, and plant fuel use and losses during the month are collected from operators of natural gas processing plants. End-of-month stocks are collected from fractionators.

The Form EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report," collects data on the movements of crude oil and petroleum products between PAD Districts. Data are reported by shipping and receiving PAD District and sub-PAD District. Shipments to and from the Panama Canal are also included if the shipment was delivered to the Canal.

The Form EIA-819, "Monthly Oxygenate Report" collects facility-level data on oxygenate inputs, production, gasoline blending at ethanol plants, and end-of-month stocks. Data on end-of-month stocks are reported on a custody basis regardless of ownership. Fuel ethanol storage capacity is collected on a semi-annual basis.

(2.) Frame

EIA maintains complete lists of respondents to its monthly surveys. Each survey has a list of companies and facilities required to submit petroleum activity data. This list is known as the survey frame. Frame maintenance procedures are used to monitor the status of petroleum companies and facilities currently contained in each survey frame as well as to identify new members to be added to the frame. As a result, all known petroleum supply organizations falling within the definition of "Who Must Submit" participate in the survey.

The activities for frames maintenance are conducted on an ongoing basis. Monthly frames maintenance procedures focus on examining industry periodicals that report changes in status (births, deaths, sales, mergers, and acquisitions) of petroleum facilities producing, transporting, importing, and/or storing crude oil and petroleum products. Augmenting these sources are articles in newspapers, notices from respondents, and information received from survey systems operated by other offices. Survey managers review these sources regularly to monitor changes in company operations and to develop lists of potential respondents. These activities assure coverage of the reporting universe and maintain accurate facility information on addresses and ownership.

Respondents to Form EIA-810, "Monthly Refinery Report" include operators of all operating and idle petroleum refineries located in the 50 States, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam and other U.S. possessions.

Respondents to Form EIA-812, "Monthly Product Pipeline Report" include all product pipeline companies that carry petroleum products (including interstate, intrastate, and intra-company pipelines) in the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

Respondents to Form EIA-813, "Monthly Crude Oil Report" include all companies which carry or store 1,000 barrels or more of crude oil. Included in this survey are gathering and trunk pipeline companies (including interstate, intrastate, and intra-company pipelines), crude oil producers, terminal operators, storers of crude oil (except refineries), and companies transporting Alaskan crude oil by water in the 50 States and the District of Columbia.

Respondents to Form EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report" include each importer of record (or Ultimate consignee in some situations regarding Canadian imports) that import crude oil or petroleum products (1) into the 50 States and the District of Columbia, (2) into Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and other U.S. possessions (Guam, Midway Islands, Wake Island, American Samoa, and Northern Mariana Islands), (3) into Foreign Trade Zones located in the 50 States and the District of Columbia and (4) from Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands and other U.S. possessions into the 50 States and the District of Columbia. A report is required only if there has been an import during the month unless the importer has been selected as part of a sample to report every month regardless of activity.

Respondents to Form EIA-815, "Monthly Terminal Blender Report" include operators of all bulk terminals located in the 50 States, District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Guam, and other U. S. possessions must report. A bulk terminal is primarily used for storage, marketing, and often blending of petroleum products and has a total bulk storage capacity of 50,000 barrels or more, and/or receives petroleum products by tanker, barge, or pipeline. Bulk terminal facilities associated with a product pipeline are included.

Respondents to Form EIA-816, "Monthly Natural Gas Liquids Report" include operators of all facilities that extract liquid hydrocarbons from a natural gas stream (natural gas processing plant) and/or separate a liquid hydrocarbon stream into its component products (fractionator).

Respondents to Form EIA-817, "Monthly Tanker and Barge Movement Report" include all companies that have custody of crude oil or petroleum products transported by tanker or barge between Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts and all companies that have custody of crude oil or petroleum products originating from a PAD District and transported to the Panama Canal with the intent that the crude oil or petroleum products be further transported to another PAD District.

For purposes of this report, custody is defined as physical possession of crude oil or petroleum products on a company-owned tanker or barge. Also, companies that lease vessels or contract for the movement of crude oil or petroleum products on a tanker or barge between PAD Districts are considered to have custody.

Respondents to Form EIA-819, "Monthly Oxygenate Report" include all operators of facilities that produce (manufacture or distill) oxygenates (including MTBE plants, petrochemical plants, and refineries that produce oxygenates as part of their operations located in the 50 States and the District of Columbia.)

(3.) Collection

Survey data for the MPSRS are collected by facsimile, email, Internet using secure file transfer, and electronic transmission. All respondents must submit their data by the 20th calendar day following the end of the report month. Receipt of the reports is monitored using an automated respondent mailing list. Telephone follow-up calls are made to nonrespondents prior to the publication deadline. Respondents who are chronically late (i.e., 3 consecutive months) are notified by EIA by certified letter.

(4.) Processing and Micro Editing

Upon receipt, all reported data are transformed into a standard format and sent through a log-in and prescreening process to validate respondent control information and resolve any discrepancies. The data are then processed using generalized edit and imputation procedures. Automated editing procedures check current data for consistency with past data and for internal consistency (e.g., totals equal to the sums of the parts). After the edit failures are resolved and imputation performed for nonrespondents, preliminary tables are produced and used to identify anomalies. These tables show U.S. and PAD District estimates for the current month and the prior 4 years. Anomalies result in further review of respondent data which in turn may result in additional flagged data and imputation.

(5.) Estimation and Imputation

The eight monthly supply surveys are census surveys. As such, the estimates using these data are the sum of the edited, reported data. Imputation is performed for companies that fail to file Forms EIA-810, 812, 813, 815, 816, and 819. For these companies, previous monthly values and values reported on the weekly survey forms are used if available. Data for nonrespondents to the Forms EIA-814 and 817 are not imputed because respondent-level data for these surveys are highly variable.

Adjustments are made to aggregate data from time to time. For example, unusual industry conditions, including fuel transitions, business practice shifts, or hurricane dislocations, may generate reporting anomalies and require adjustments. Measurement error and frame deficiencies may occasionally result in inconsistencies when individual respondent data are aggregated to publication levels and require adjustment. Monthly supply data are reviewed throughout the year and some estimates may be replaced with newly available or resubmitted respondent data in the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA).

(6.) Macro Editing

Monthly data are compared to weekly data on a regular basis. Discrepancies between weekly and monthly data are documented and respondents are called when discrepancies are either large (usually over 300 thousand barrels) or consistent (e.g., weekly data are always lower than monthly data). In addition, a comparison of the data collected on the PSRS with other similar data series from sources outside of the EIA is performed on an ongoing basis. Results of selected data comparisons are published once a year in the feature article, "Comparison of Independent Statistics on Petroleum Supply." Additional comparisons are made between survey data and model results. Data reported in the Petroleum Supply Monthly and Petroleum Supply Annual are routinely imputed to correct for cases where comparison with other data suggests errors in survey data.

(7.) Dissemination

The PSMdata are normally released within 60 days of the close of the reference month. The PSM is available on the web at:

http://www.eia.doe.gov/oil_gas/petroleum/data_publications/ petroleum_supply_monthly/psm.html

Customers who do not have access to the Internet may call the National Energy Information Center (NEIC) to request a single print-on-demand copy (a black and white bound printed document). To take advantage of this service, call the NEIC at 202-586-8800 or email them at infoctr@eia.doe.gov. This service is provided free of charge for a single copy. NEIC will not accept or print multiple copy orders.

Much of the PSM data are available on the web product, Petroleum Navigator. Petroleum Navigator provides an interface for accessing a comprehensive set of EIA's petroleum data. Features include: downloadable spreadsheets containing complete data history, data tables which "pivot" to present different perspectives, and selection boxes to easily change the product, area, process, period, and unit of measure. Petroleum Navigator can be accessed at:

http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_top.asp

The Petroleum Supply and Disposition table displaying all the components of supply and disposition for all products on one page in a given period can be found at:

http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_d_nus_ mbbl_m_cur.htm

Annual petroleum supply statistics compiled from the latest monthly data, Census export, and MMS crude oil production data are released in two volumes. The PSA, Volume 1 contains final annual data for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products.

http://www.eia.doe.gov/oil_gas/petroleum/data_publications/ petroleum_supply_annual/psa_volume1/psa_volume1.html

The PSA, Volume 2 contains final monthly statistics for the supply and disposition of crude oil and petroleum products.

http://www.eia.doe.gov/oil_gas/petroleum/data_publications/ petroleum_supply_annual/psa_volume2/psa_volume2.html

C. Derived Data

Due to the time constraints in publishing monthly petroleum supply statistics and the desire to reduce industry response burden, some of the statistics published in the PSM are obtained from sources other than the monthly supply surveys. These other sources include models to data and data from supplemental sources such as the Bureau of the Census.

(1.) Domestic Crude Oil Production

In order to present timelier crude oil production estimates, the EIA prepares a weekly crude oil production estimate that is published in the Weekly Petroleum Status Report (WPSR). At the end of the production month, weekly crude oil production estimates are aggregated into an original estimate of monthly crude oil production. The original monthly estimate of crude oil production for the U.S. and the State of Alaska is published in Table 3.1 of the Monthly Energy Review (MER).

A month later, the original estimate is replaced by an interim estimate of U.S., PAD District, and Alaskan crude oil production for the current reference month which is published in Tables 1 through 25 of the PSM. The interim estimates for the current reference month are based on:

(a.) crude oil production data reported to the EIA by State government conservation agencies;

(b.) first purchase data reported on Form EIA-182, "Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Report;" All States except Michigan, New York, Ohio, and Pennsylvania report production on a monthly basis. These four States report crude oil production on an annual basis. Estimates of monthly crude oil production for these four States are made by the EIA using data reported on Form EIA-182;

(c.) exponential or hyperbolic curve fitted projections based on recent State data; or

(d.) constant level projections based on the average production rate during a recent time period.

There is a time lag of approximately 4 months between the end of the production month and the time when most monthly State crude oil production data become available. State-level production estimates are published in Table 26, "Production of Crude Oil by PAD District and State." The State level estimates in Table 26 are two month's behind the U.S. and PAD District level estimates in Tables 1-25.

Table 26 contains an adjustment row for each PAD District to reconcile the national and PAD District level totals created by summing the State estimates in Table 26 with the national and PAD District estimates previously published in Tables 1-25. Data on crude oil production for Federal offshore areas are reported to the EIA by the Minerals Management Service of the U.S. Department of the Interior and the California Department of Conservation and are also shown in Table 26.

After the end of each calendar year, the monthly crude oil production estimates are updated using annual reports from various State agencies, the Minerals Management Service, and the California Department of Conservation. Revised data at the State, PAD District, and national levels are published without adjustments in the PSA. Updates received after the PSA is released are published in Appendix D "Revised Crude Oil Production" in Volume 1 of the following year's PSA.

The table below illustrates when and where crude oil production data are available. For example, crude oil production data for the month of June is first available in the following publication:
Publication containing Geographic Level
June Data:

June WPSR (weekly data) U.S., Alaska

July MER U.S., Alaska

August PSM Revised U.S., PAD
 District, Alaska

October PSM Alaska with North Slope
 and South breakouts, State
 level for selected States,
 State and Federal Offshore


(2.) Exports

The U.S. Bureau of the Census compiles the official U.S. export statistics. Exporters are required to file a "Shipper's Export Declaration Document" with the U.S. Census Bureau. Each month the EIA receives aggregated export statistics from the U.S. Bureau of the Census (EM-522 and EM-594). Census export statistics used in the PSM reflect both government and non-governmental exports of domestic and foreign merchandise from the United States (the 50 States and the District of Columbia) to foreign countries and U.S. possessions, without regard to whether or not the exportation involves a commercial transaction. The following types of transactions are excluded from the statistics:

* Merchandise shipped in transit through the United States from one foreign country to another, when documented as such with U.S. Customs.

* Bunker fuels and other supplies and equipment for use on departing vessels, planes, or other carriers engaged in foreign trade.

The country of destination is defined as the country of ultimate destination or the country where the goods are to be consumed, further processed, or manufactured, as known to the shipper at the time of exportation. If the shipper does not know the country of ultimate destination, the shipment is credited to the last country to which the shipper knows that the merchandise will be shipped in the same form as it was when exported.

(3.) Stocks of Crude Oil on Leases

This adjustment corrects for incomplete survey coverage of companies that store crude oil on leases. Up until 1983, monthly state government data on lease stocks were substituted for EIA data wherever possible in order to rectify the understatement of lease crude oil stocks. State data were available from three states--Texas, New Mexico, and Montana. To calculate the "lease adjustment," a comparison between EIA reported data and the state government data was made and the difference added to the EIA data for the respective states.

In 1983, the EIA modified the Form EIA-813 to eliminate state data on crude oil stocks and began collecting crude oil stock data by Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District. With this change, the "lease adjustment" could no longer be calculated on a state basis and was changed to a PAD District level. To adjust for this incomplete coverage, 10,300 thousand barrels of crude oil are added to PAD District 3 stocks and 330 thousand barrels are added to PAD District 4 stocks.

(4.) Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) Natural Gas Plant Liquids (NGPL Adjustment

The TAPS-NGPL adjustment corrects for overstatement of crude oil receipts and input at refineries due to NGPL injection into Alaskan crude oil transported in TAPS. Natural gas processing plants in Alaska produce substantial volumes of NGPL that are added to crude oil transported through TAPS. Refiners have been unable to separate the volume of NGPL from Alaskan crude oil when reporting crude oil receipts and inputs to EIA. The TAPS-NGPL adjustment subtracts Alaskan NGPL production reported by selected gas processing plant operators from crude oil receipts and inputs reported by refiners. Adjusted NGPL production is added to refinery receipts and inputs of NGPL. The adjusted NGPL barrels are allocated to PAD Districts based on the regional distribution of receipts of Alaskan crude oil. Data most affected by the TAPSNGPL adjustment are receipts and inputs of crude oil in PAD District 5 and receipts, inputs, and product supplied of butane and pentanes plus also in PAD District 5.

NGPL injections into crude oil transported in the TAPS started in 1987. The TAPS-NGPL adjustment was first applied to revised data reported in the Petroleum Supply Annual (PSA) for 1988.

(5.) Finished Motor Gasoline Adjustment

Adjustment quantities for finished motor gasoline are the sum of motor gasoline blending components, fuel ethanol, and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) adjustments reclassified to finished motor gasoline. Finished motor gasoline adjustment quantities are assumed to reflect gasoline blending activity that was not reported on surveys.

* Adjustment quantities for finished reformulated motor gasoline include adjustments for reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) plus a percentage of gasoline treated as blendstock (GTAB), "other" motor gasoline blending components, fuel ethanol, and MTBE. The quantity of GTAB and "other" motor gasoline blending components adjustments reclassified to finished reformulated motor gasoline is based on the ratio of finished reformulated motor gasoline net production divided by total finished motor gasoline net production reported on surveys by refiners and blenders in each PAD District. Motor gasoline blending components adjustments reclassified to finished reformulated motor gasoline are further classified as blended with alcohol (i.e. fuel ethanol), blended with ether (i.e. MTBE), or non-oxygenated during 2009.

Starting with data for January 2010, motor gasoline blending component adjustment quantities were classified only as blended with fuel ethanol and "other". During 2009, RBOB adjustment quantities were classified based on the product description that included reference to the oxygenate to be blended. Beginning with data for January 2010, all RBOB is reported in one product category without reference to specific oxygenates, and all RBOB adjustment quantities are assumed blended with fuel ethanol. During 2009, adjustment quantities for GTAB and "other" motor gasoline blending components reclassified to finished reformulated gasoline were further classified as blended with ether, blended with alcohol, or non-oxygenated based on the ratio of production of these products in reported survey data. After determining adjustment quantities of motor gasoline blending components reclassified to each type of finished reformulated motor gasoline, portions of the fuel ethanol and MTBE adjustments were reclassified to reformulated motor gasoline. The fuel ethanol quantity reclassified to finished reformulated motor gasoline was determined using the ratio of fuel ethanol blended into finished motor gasoline calculated from fuel ethanol blending data reported on survey forms by PAD District. For example, if the calculated volumetric fuel ethanol blend ratio was 10%, then a quantity of the fuel ethanol adjustment sufficient to make a 10% blend with the available motor gasoline blending components is reclassified to finished reformulated motor gasoline, but the quantity of fuel ethanol cannot exceed the total quantity of the fuel ethanol adjustment. During 2009, a similar process was followed for allocating the MTBE adjustment to reformulated motor gasoline except the blend ratio was assumed to be 12% in all PAD Districts. Starting with data for January 2010, the entire MTBE adjustment quantity is assumed to be blended with finished conventional motor gasoline.

* Adjustment quantities for finished conventional motor gasoline include adjustments for conventional blendstock for oxygenate blending (CBOB) plus the portion of GTAB, "other" motor gasoline blending components, fuel ethanol and MTBE adjustments that were not reclassified to finished reformulated motor gasoline. The total adjustment to finished conventional motor gasoline is further classified as finished conventional gasoline blended with fuel ethanol and "other" finished conventional motor gasoline. The quantity of the finished conventional motor gasoline adjustment reclassified as finished conventional motor gasoline blended with fuel ethanol is determined using the quantity of the fuel ethanol adjustment allocated to finished conventional motor gasoline and the fuel ethanol blend ratio calculated from fuel ethanol blending reported on surveys by PAD District. For example, if the fuel ethanol blend ratio calculated from survey data was 10% in a PAD District, then the total adjustment quantity of finished conventional motor gasoline in that PAD District would be 10 times the fuel ethanol adjustment quantity allocated to finished conventional gasoline (i.e. the adjustment to finished conventional motor gasoline blended with fuel ethanol includes 10% fuel ethanol and 90% gasoline from the motor gasoline blending components adjustment). The MTBE adjustment allocated to finished conventional motor gasoline is simply added to the adjustment for "other" finished conventional motor gasoline.

* Fuel ethanol adjustment quantities frequently exceed the volume of fuel ethanol needed to achieve a blend ratio implied by blending activity reported by refiners and blenders on surveys when considering only the gasoline barrels available from the motor gasoline blending components adjustment. In this case, "other" finished conventional motor gasoline is reclassified by the adjustment to finished conventional motor gasoline blended with alcohol in order to maintain an ethanol blend ratio equal to the fuel ethanol blend ratio reported by refiners and blenders in each PAD District.

(6.) Motor Gasoline Blending Components Adjustment

Adjustment quantities for motor gasoline blending components at the U.S. level equal the sum of stock change, refinery and blender net input, and exports minus the sum of imports and renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production (i.e. motor gasoline blending components use as denaturant for fuel ethanol production). Adjustment quantities by PAD District equal the sum of stock change, refinery and blender net input, and exports minus the sum of imports, renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production, and net receipts. Motor gasoline blending components adjustments are calculated for reformulated blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB), conventional blendstock for oxygenate blending (CBOB), gasoline treated as blendstock (GTAB), and "other" motor gasoline blending components. Product supplied for motor gasoline blending components is assumed to always equal zero because there is no end-user demand for motor gasoline blending components as anything other than finished motor gasoline. Motor gasoline blending components adjustment quantities are assumed to reflect finished motor gasoline blending implied by the supply and disposition balance but not reported on surveys. Adjustment quantities for motor gasoline blending components are reclassified to finished motor gasoline and added to the finished motor gasoline adjustment.

(7.) Renewable Fuels including Fuel Ethanol Adjustment

Adjustment quantities for renewable fuels (including fuel ethanol) at the U.S. level equal the sum of stock change, refinery and blender net input, and exports minus the sum of renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production and imports. Calculation of adjustment quantities by PAD District depends on the product. Individual products include fuel ethanol, biomass based diesel fuel (including biodiesel), "other" renewable diesel fuel, and "other" renewable fuels (e.g. bio-jet fuel). Product supplied for renewable fuels (including fuel ethanol) is assumed equal to zero. Adjustments for fuel ethanol and "other" renewable fuels are discussed separately below.

* Fuel ethanol adjustment quantities at the U.S. level equal the sum of stock change, refinery and blender net input, and exports minus the sum of renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production and imports. There are no survey data available for rail movements of fuel ethanol between PAD Districts, and so allocation of fuel ethanol adjustments to PAD Districts is based on the ratio of fuel ethanol blending reported on surveys in each PAD District divided by fuel ethanol blending reported on surveys for the entire U.S. In this case, Fuel ethanol implied net receipts are calculated for each PAD District as the sum of stock change, refinery and blender net input, and exports minus the sum of renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production, imports, and adjustments. Fuel ethanol implied net receipts are the balancing item between total supply and disposition in each PAD District. Fuel ethanol adjustment quantities are assumed to reflect blending of fuel ethanol into finished motor gasoline that is implied by the available supply of fuel ethanol but not reported on surveys. Fuel ethanol adjustment volumes are reclassified to finished reformulated motor gasoline and finished conventional motor gasoline through finished motor gasoline adjustments.

* The product category called "renewable fuels except fuel ethanol" includes biomass-based diesel fuel (including biodiesel), "other" renewable diesel fuel, and "other" renewable fuels (e.g. bio-jet fuel). Renewable fuels except fuel ethanol adjustment quantities at the U.S. and PAD District levels are calculated as the sum of stock change, refinery and blender net input, and exports minus imports. Data for production of Renewable Fuels except Fuel Ethanol is unavailable and is excluded from Renewable Fuels and Oxygenate Plant Net Production. Therefore the calculation of adjustments to Renewable Fuels except Fuel Ethanol causes production to be included in the adjustment. Similarly, the calculation causes net interPAD District movements (i.e. net receipts) by rail and truck to also be included in adjustments to renewable fuels except fuel ethanol.

(8.) Distillate Fuel Oil Adjustment

Adjustment quantities for distillate fuel oil show reclassification by pipeline operators of distillate fuel oil with sulfur content of 15 ppm and under to distillate fuel oil with sulfur content greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm (inclusive). Reclassification may occur when distillate product with sulfur content of 15 ppm and under becomes mixed with products having higher sulfur content during pipeline transportation, storage, or handling. Adjustment quantities are reported by pipeline operators on Form EIA-812 "Monthly Product Pipeline Report."

(9.) Crude Oil Adjustment

Adjustment quantities for crude oil are derived to balance crude oil supply and disposition. Crude oil product supplied was equal to crude oil used directly as reported on Form EIA-813 "Monthly Crude Oil Report" in data through December 2009. Reporting crude oil used directly was discontinued on Form EIA-813 after collection of data for December 2009. Crude oil product supplied is assumed equal to zero beginning with data for January 2010. Undercounting crude oil imports in survey data is one example of a typical cause of crude oil adjustments. This results in a positive crude oil adjustment because crude oil disposition (i.e. the sum of stock change, refiner inputs, and exports) will exceed available supply (i.e. the sum of field production and imports) due to import undercounting. Crude oil losses are included in crude oil adjustment quantities. The crude oil adjustment was formerly called unaccounted-for crude oil. The name change was effective with data for January 2005.

(10.) Other Hydrocarbon Adjustment

Adjustment quantities for "other" hydrocarbons equal the sum of stock change, refinery and blender net inputs and exports minus imports. "Other" hydrocarbons product supplied is assumed equal to zero. Adjustment quantities account for "other" hydrocarbons produced outside of refineries. There are no movements data collected on surveys for "other" hydrocarbons. Therefore, adjustment quantities include any net receipts of "other" hydrocarbons resulting from inter-PAD

District movements.

(11.) Hydrogen Adjustment

Adjustment quantities for hydrogen equal refinery and blender net input of hydrogen. Hydrogen product supplied is assumed equal to zero. Adjustment quantities account for hydrogen supplied to U.S. refineries from non-refinery sources. There are no movements data collected on surveys for hydrogen. Therefore, adjustment quantities at the PAD District level include any net receipts of hydrogen resulting from inter-PAD District movements.

(12.) Oxygenates (excluding fuel ethanol) Adjustment

Adjustment quantities for oxygenates (excluding fuel ethanol) equal the sum of stock change, refinery and blender net inputs, and exports minus the sum of renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production and imports. Product supplied for oxygenates (excluding fuel ethanol) is assumed equal to zero. Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) is the single largest component of oxygenates (excluding fuel ethanol). Adjustments calculated for MTBE are reclassified to finished motor gasoline and are added to finish motor gasoline supply through the finished motor gasoline adjustment. There are no survey data available for movements of MTBE between PAD Districts. MTBE adjustment quantities are allocated to PAD Districts using ratios equal to the sum of MTBE input and export for each PAD District divided by the sum of MTBE input and export for the U.S. MTBE implied net receipts are calculated for each PAD District as the sum of stock change, refinery and blender net input, and exports minus the sum of renewable fuels and oxygenate plant net production, imports, and adjustments. MTBE implied net receipts are the balancing item between total supply and disposition in each PAD District.

3. Quality

A. General Discussion

(1.) Response Rates

The response rate is generally 98 to 100 percent. Average response rates for the monthly and weekly surveys are published in the annual PSM article "Accuracy of Petroleum Supply Data." Chronic nonrespondents and late filing respondents are contacted in writing and reminded of their requirement to report. Companies that file late or fail to file are subject to criminal fines, civil penalties, and other sanctions as provided by Section 13(i) of the Federal Energy Administration (FEA) Act.

(2.) Non-sampling Errors

There are two types of errors usually associated with data produced from a survey; sampling errors and nonsampling errors. Because the estimates for the monthly surveys are based on a complete census of the frame, there is no sampling error in the data presented. The data, however, are subject to nonsampling errors. Non-sampling errors may arise from a number of sources including: (1) the inability to obtain data from all companies in the frame (non-response) and the method used to account for non-response, (2) response errors, (3) differences in the interpretation of questions or definitions, (4) mistakes in recording or coding of the data obtained from respondents, and (5) other errors of collection, response, coverage, processing, and estimation.

(3.) Resubmissions

Throughout the year, EIA accepts data revisions of monthly data. If a revision to a monthly submission is made after the PSM has been published, it is referred to as a resubmission. The final monthly values for the previous year are published in the PSA. These values reflect all PSM resubmissions and other data corrections. The values contained in the PSA are EIA's most accurate measure of petroleum supply activity.

(4.) Revision Policy

EIA will disseminate revised monthly PSRS data during the year only if the revision is expected to substantively affect understanding of the U.S. petroleum supply. The decision to disseminate a revision during the year will be based on EIA's judgment of the revision's expected effect. At the end of year, the monthly data are revised to reflect all resubmitted data received during the year. The official final monthly petroleum supply data are included in the PSA. When EIA disseminates any revised PSRS data, it will alert users to the affected data value(s) that were revised. Updates to crude oil production data received after the PSA is released are published in Appendix D "Revised Crude Oil Production" of Volume 1 of the following year's PSA.

B. Data Assessment

The principal objective of the PSRS is to provide an accurate picture of petroleum industry activities and of the availability of petroleum products nationwide from primary distribution channels. The PSM preliminary monthly data serve as leading indicators of the final monthly data published in the PSA. The PSM monthly data are not expected to have the same level of accuracy as the final monthly data published in the PSA. However, the preliminary monthly data are expected to exhibit like trends and product flow characteristic of the final monthly data.

To assess the accuracy of monthly statistics, initial monthly estimates published in the PSM are compared with the final monthly aggregates published in the PSA. Although final monthly data are still subject to error, they have been thoroughly reviewed and edited, they reflect all revisions made during the year, and they are considered to be the most accurate data available. The mean absolute percent error provides a measure of the average revisions relative to the aggregates being measured for a variable. The mean absolute percent error for 2007 monthly data was less than 1 percent for 50 of the 66 major petroleum variables analyzed.

4. Provisions Regarding Disclosure of Information

All PSRS survey forms, with the exception of the Form EIA-814, "Monthly Imports Report," have the same general disclosure information statement. The information reported on Form EIA-814 will be considered "public information" and may be publicly released in company or individually identifiable form, and will not be protected from disclosure in identifiable form.

The information reported on Forms EIA-810 through 813, 815 through 817, 819, and 820 will be protected and not disclosed to the public to the extent that it satisfies the criteria for exemption under the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), 5 U.S.C. [section] 552, the Department of Energy (DOE) regulations, 10 C.F.R. [section] 1004.11, implementing the FOIA, and the Trade Secrets Act, 18 U.S.C. [section] 1905.

The Federal Energy Administration Act requires the EIA to provide company-specific data to other Federal agencies when requested for official use. The information reported on this form may also be made available, upon request, to another DOE component; to any Committee of Congress, the Government Accountability Office, or other Federal agencies authorized by law to receive such information. A court of competent jurisdiction may obtain this information in response to an order. The information may be used for any nonstatistical purposes such as administrative, regulatory, law enforcement, or adjudicatory purposes.

Disclosure limitation procedures are not applied to the statistical data published from this survey's information. Thus, there may be some statistics that are based on data from fewer than three respondents, or that are dominated by data from one or two large respondents. In these cases, it may be possible for a knowledgeable person to estimate the information reported by a specific respondent.

In addition to the use of the information by EIA for statistical purposes, the information may be made available, upon request, to other Federal agencies authorized by law to receive such information for any nonstatistical purposes such as administrative, regulatory, law enforcement, or adjudicatory purposes.

Company specific data are also provided to other DOE offices for the purpose of examining specific petroleum operations in the context of emergency response planning and actual emergencies.
Table B1. Finished Motor Gasoline Product Supplied and Gasoline
Supply Added by Adjustments to Motor Gasoline Blending Components
and Fuel Ethanol, 1997-2008

(Thousand Barrels per Day)

Item/Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May

1997
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 39 50 51 46 48
Motor Gas Blending -20 61 -27 87 73
Products Supplied 7,301 7,668 7,796 8,064 8,139

1998
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 66 55 61 55 42
Motor Gas Blending 84 39 117 140 142
Products Supplied 7,618 7,711 8,004 8,312 8,279

1999
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 57 52 52 53 50
Motor Gas Blending 81 -13 20 134 46
Products Supplied 7,701 8,031 8,128 8,506 8,420

2000
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 60 47 62 62 76
Motor Gas Blending 255 208 178 158 198
Products Supplied 7,653 8,291 8,305 8,375 8.661

2001
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 80 65 61 59 64
Motor Gas Blending 264 121 289 303 196
Products Supplied 8,099 8,234 8,532 8,575 8,706

2002
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 60 68 40 75 78
Motor Gas Blending 184 214 174 233 339
Products Supplied 8,227 8,607 8.655 8,766 9,078

2003
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 13 49 8 45 38
Motor Gas Blending 109 174 209 265 354
Products Supplied 8,414 8,525 8,602 8,838 9.042

2004
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 17 21 7 36 36
Motor Gas Blending 217 393 469 574 464
Products Supplied 8,705 8,838 9.024 9,126 9.179

2005
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 37 31 24 32 39
Motor Gas Blending 357 251 200 222 337
Products Supplied 8,775 8,798 8,996 9,130 9,257

2006
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 33 37 48 36 23
Motor Gas Blending 278 226 406 486 714
Products Supplied 8,727 8,836 9,129 9,140 9,312

2007
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 68 51 58 62 67
Motor Gas Blending 512 462 607 674 608
Products Supplied 8,891 9,025 9,169 9,232 9,429

2008
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 117 118 118 163 134
Motor Gas Blending 223 259 246 138 402
Products Supplied 8,814 8,842 9.069 9,117 9,216

Item/Year Jun Jul Aug Sep

1997
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 38 59 37 47
Motor Gas Blending 113 89 95 115
Products Supplied 8,288 8,496 8,233 8,023

1998
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 50 49 58 62
Motor Gas Blending 246 111 88 171
Products Supplied 8,520 8,680 8,568 8,310

1999
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 59 43 54 55
Motor Gas Blending 214 192 128 102
Products Supplied 8,886 8,942 8,579 8,305

2000
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 52 68 73 66
Motor Gas Blending 125 80 158 155
Products Supplied 8,824 8,642 8,921 8,518

2001
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 40 96 52 71
Motor Gas Blending 210 213 245 196
Products Supplied 8,690 9,023 8,953 8,557

2002
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 66 66 48 56
Motor Gas Blending 287 269 252 177
Products Supplied 9,140 9,143 9,313 8,687

2003
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 31 29 44 31
Motor Gas Blending 399 314 375 298
Products Supplied 9,170 9,192 9,411 8,926

2004
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 53 25 32 37
Motor Gas Blending 609 466 493 489
Products Supplied 9,322 9,357 9,327 9,015

2005
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 54 47 55 40
Motor Gas Blending 310 460 455 382
Products Supplied 9.380 9,451 9,454 8,897

2006
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 40 27 44 51
Motor Gas Blending 207 663 432 649
Products Supplied 9.440 9,583 9,585 9,222

2007
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 73 84 95 51
Motor Gas Blending 473 627 553 544
Products Supplied 9,510 9,622 9,592 9,244

2008
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 117 99 107 156
Motor Gas Blending 371 331 448 376
Products Supplied 9,071 9,072 9,090 8,469

Item/Year Oct Nov Dec Avg

1997
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 69 50 61 50
Motor Gas Blending 107 165 80 78
Products Supplied 8,141 7,965 8,065 8,017

1998
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 71 55 75 58
Motor Gas Blending 89 145 205 132
Products Supplied 8,378 8,167 8,451 8,253

1999
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 64 66 72 56
Motor Gas Blending 212 156 165 120
Products Supplied 8,542 8,240 8,859 8,431

2000
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 74 73 76 66
Motor Gas Blending 107 83 319 169
Products Supplied 8,417 8,384 8,670 8,472

2001
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 93 63 58 67
Motor Gas Blending 193 175 252 222
Products Supplied 8,655 8,677 8,585 8,610

2002
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 58 80 62 63
Motor Gas Blending 172 208 235 229
Products Supplied 8,814 8,829 8,893 8,848

2003
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 35 41 22 32
Motor Gas Blending 324 281 194 275
Products Supplied 9,108 8,946 9,011 8,935

2004
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 29 25 27 29
Motor Gas Blending 372 347 265 429
Products Supplied 9,097 9,055 9,206 9,105

2005
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 45 50 47 42
Motor Gas Blending 360 239 436 335
Products Supplied 9,013 9,079 9,246 9,125

2006
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 32 52 37 38
Motor Gas Blending 539 645 689 497
Products Supplied 9,286 9,160 9,335 9,233

2007
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 93 100 113 76
Motor Gas Blending 534 689 535 569
Products Supplied 9,250 9,249 9,249 9,290

2008
Fuel Ethanol Adj. 93 76 108 117
Motor Gas Blending 171 417 77 288
Products Supplied 8,986 8,889 8,921 8,964

Adjustments to finished motor gasoline, motor gasoline blending
components, fuel ethanol, and Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether (MTBE)
are available in Petroleum Navigator.

http://tonto.eia.doe.gov/dnav/pet/pet_sum_snd_d_nus_mbblpd_m_cur.htm

Note: Totals may not equal sum of components due to
independent rounding.

Sources: Annual Averages, 1997-2007. Energy Information
Administration (EIA) Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 1 (table 2).
Monthly Data. 1997-2007, Petroleum Supply Annual, Volume 2 (table
2), Annual Average, 2008, Petroleum Supply Monthly, February 2009
issue (table 4), Monthly Data, 2008, Petroleum Supply Monthly,
(table 3).
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Title Annotation:Appendix B
Publication:Petroleum Supply Monthly
Article Type:Sound recording review
Date:Aug 1, 2010
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