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PRESIDENTS OF NATIONAL CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION, NATURE CONSERVANCY MEET TO DISCUSS MUTUAL CONCERNS

PRESIDENTS OF NATIONAL CATTLEMEN'S ASSOCIATION, NATURE CONSERVANCY MEET
 TO DISCUSS MUTUAL CONCERNS
 ARLINGTON, Va., May 12 /PRNewswire/ -- Yesterday Jimmie Wilson, president of the National Cattlemen's Association, and John C. Sawhill, president and CEO of the Nature Conservancy, met to discuss environmental issues and the possibilities for cooperation between the two groups.
 Tensions between the beef industry and the environmental movement have been mounting in recent years, so "we feel it is particularly important that the Conservancy and the Cattlemen's Association lead the way for actions that are mutually beneficial, not divisive," said Sawhill, head of the international conservation group. He pointed to several on-the-ground examples of Conservancy work proving that "what's good for nature is good for business.
 "Because the Nature Conservancy is not opposed to cattle grazing and doesn't get involved in issues such as cattle-grazing fees on public lands, we are hopeful that we can work together with the cattle industry," Sawhill continued. The Nature Conservancy was selected to be a member of the National Cattlemen's Association's Environmental Stewardship award committee last year.
 The Nature Conservancy, which is dedicated to preserving the diversity of life on Earth, often grazes cattle on ecosystems that co-evolved with bison, antelope, elk and deer. The Conservancy currently grazes cattle on over 500,000 acres of land that it manages as either owner or partner.
 Conservancy preserves have provided economic opportunities for local residents in many states by combining natural diversity protection with the needs of a local ranching operation. Low-interest loans, payment for conservation easements, pasture leases and employment opportunities are a few of the ways that the Nature Conservancy preserves have contributed to local communities.
 The mission of the Nature Conservancy is to preserve plants, animals, and natural communities that represent the diversity of life on Earth by protecting the lands and water they need to survive. To date, the Conservancy and its 645,000 members have been responsible for the protection of more than 6.3 million acres in 50 states and Canada. It has helped like-minded partner organizations to preserve millions of acres in Latin America and the Caribbean. While some Conservancy acquired areas are donated or sold to other conservation groups, both public and private, the Conservancy owns more than 1,200 preserves -- the largest private nature sanctuary system in the world.
 -0- 5/12/92
 /CONTACT: Kelly Cash, 703-841-4837, or Ron Geatz, 703-841-4897, both of the Nature Conservancy/ CO: The Nature Conservancy; National Cattlemen's Association ST: Virginia IN: FOD SU:


GK -- NY012 -- 8983 05/12/92 09:28 EDT
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:May 12, 1992
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