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POST-FIRE REHABILITATION BEGINS CONSTRUCTION; $1.4 MILLION IN WORK PROPOSED IN ALTADENA AREA FIRE

 FLINTRIDGE, Calif., Nov. 22 /PRNewswire/ -- Conservation work will begin today on some of the 27 separate measures designed to protect the homes and lands of the fire-damaged watersheds of the Altadena area and on the Angeles Forest, according to the U.S. Soil Conservation Service. The U.S. Soil Conservation Service will pay 75 percent of the estimated $1.4 million in protective measures, with the remainder coming from sponsoring county and local agencies.
 The U.S. Forest Service is working closely with SCS on work in the Angeles National Forest, while the county of Los Angeles will cosponsor most of the projects on private lands.
 Proposed structures will help to collect sediment, protect drainage systems and direct runoff to minimize flooding and mudflows to protect homes and water quality.
 "Aerial seeding on 4,900 acres has already been completed and construction measures will begin today," said Albert Cerna, assistant team leader for Soil Conservation Service on the Altadena fire. "We will soon complete contracts that will initiate spraying of a hydroseed mixture that contains seed, fertilizer and mulch that will be sprayed on to protect critical slopes near homes."
 Specific measures include the following: enlarging debris basins to collect sediment, constructing racks to keep debris out of drainage systems, constructing deflector walls, sandbag walls and straw bale check dams to channel sediment and water away from homes and property.
 "With the invaluable cooperation of all of our sponsors and the homeowners themselves, we feel we have been able to do a very thorough job of examining the watershed and pinpointing the work needed to minimize damage from the winter rains," said Cerna. "Now begins the job of actually putting practices on the land."
 "However," said Cerna, "we want to be very clear that this is not a cure-all -- there is no cure-all for a fire-damaged watershed except time. When the vegetation is gone and the rain comes, there will be mud and there will be problems. We can work to minimize that but we can't eliminate that."
 Soil Conservation Service and its partners will continues to do one-on-one consultation work with affected area landowners.
 -0- 11/22/93
 /NOTE TO EDITORS: For directions to see the work or to arrange interviews with Albert Cerna, contact Rudy Perez at 818-952-8123./
 /CONTACT: Rudy Perez of U.S. Soil Conservation Service, 818-952-8123/


CO: U.S. Soil Conservation Service ST: California IN: ENV SU:

LW-TM -- SF014 -- 7044 11/22/93 20:49 EST
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Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Nov 22, 1993
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