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PIRAN advocates law to regulate operations of NGOs in Ghana.

The Kumasi-based Public Interest, Research and Advocacy Network (PIRAN-Ghana) has corroborated the call on the government to provide a framework for non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to make profit to fund their programmes and projects.

PIRAN has, therefore, called for the enactment of an NGO Act to regulate the operations of NGOs in Ghana, in support of the President of the National Philanthropy Forum, Dr. Ben Ocra, who asked governments to allow NGOs to make profit and re-inject same into their operations in his opening address at the just-ended 4th National Philanthropy Summit at the Accra International Conference Center.

In a statement jointly issued in Kumasi by Felix Djan Foh, Timothy Fiadzoe and James K. Dumenyah, President, Secretary and Coordinator respectively, PIRAN.GH explained its call for an NGO Act that in recent times, organisations are formed and pretend to be NGOs, but use them for other purposes for the sole benefit of the founders, the government, opposition, commercial companies, influential and powerful individuals.

The PIRAN executives noted that due to perceived benefits from donors, mistrust is influencing the operations of NGOs operations due to unsubstantiated misconception. PIRAN-Ghana attributed the wrong perception and the inadequate sustainability of NGOs to the lack of funds to execute programmes and projects.

The advocacy group, therefore, noted that an Act of Parliament could outline the clear boundaries to categorise NGOS into operational NGOs and advocacy NGOs.

It explained that while the operational ones seek to deliver service and execute projects among others, the advocacy NGOs will also influence policy decisions to bring positive outcomes of government and private sector policy decisions.

According to PIRAN, NGOs are supposed to be part of the civil society sector, distinct from government and the private/business sector, and that anything contrary to this is out of place, and stressed the need for an Act of Parliament to regulate the operations of NGOs to ensure transparency and accountability.

The Public Interest network emphasised the importance of NGOs and CSOs as a third force set up to bridge the gap left by the government and the private sector, and which role cannot be underrated.

'An Act of Parliament is a necessity to weed out the bad nuts,' PIRAN stated, and called on the government to consider the proposal for NGOs to venture into social enterprises to raise money to fund their projects and programmes in the face of donor fatigue.

From Sebastian R. Freiku, Kumasi

The Kumasi-based Public Interest, Research and Advocacy Network (PIRAN-Ghana) has corroborated the call on the government to provide a framework for non-governmental organisations (NGOs) to make profit to fund their programmes and projects.

PIRAN has, therefore, called for the enactment of an NGO Act to regulate the operations of NGOs in Ghana, in support of the President of the National Philanthropy Forum, Dr. Ben Ocra, who asked governments to allow NGOs to make profit and re-inject same into their operations in his opening address at the just-ended 4th National Philanthropy Summit at the Accra International Conference Center.

In a statement jointly issued in Kumasi by Felix Djan Foh, Timothy Fiadzoe and James K. Dumenyah, President, Secretary and Coordinator respectively, PIRAN.GH explained its call for an NGO Act that in recent times, organisations are formed and pretend to be NGOs, but use them for other purposes for the sole benefit of the founders, the government, opposition, commercial companies, influential and powerful individuals.

The PIRAN executives noted that due to perceived benefits from donors, mistrust is influencing the operations of NGOs operations due to unsubstantiated misconception. PIRAN-Ghana attributed the wrong perception and the inadequate sustainability of NGOs to the lack of funds to execute programmes and projects.

The advocacy group, therefore, noted that an Act of Parliament could outline the clear boundaries to categorise NGOS into operational NGOs and advocacy NGOs.

It explained that while the operational ones seek to deliver service and execute projects among others, the advocacy NGOs will also influence policy decisions to bring positive outcomes of government and private sector policy decisions.

According to PIRAN, NGOs are supposed to be part of the civil society sector, distinct from government and the private/business sector, and that anything contrary to this is out of place, and stressed the need for an Act of Parliament to regulate the operations of NGOs to ensure transparency and accountability.

The Public Interest network emphasised the importance of NGOs and CSOs as a third force set up to bridge the gap left by the government and the private sector, and which role cannot be underrated.

'An Act of Parliament is a necessity to weed out the bad nuts,' PIRAN stated, and called on the government to consider the proposal for NGOs to venture into social enterprises to raise money to fund their projects and programmes in the face of donor fatigue.
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Publication:Ghanaian Chronicle (Accra, Ghana)
Geographic Code:6GHAN
Date:Apr 18, 2019
Words:867
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