Printer Friendly

PHYSICIAN ASSISTANTS APPLAUD HEALTH CARE REFORM PLAN

 ALEXANDRIA, Va., Sept. 22 /PRNewswire/ -- The president of the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA), Ann Elderkin, P.A., from Somerville, Mass., today issued the following statement in support of the president's health care reform proposal:
 The debate over improving our nation's health care system has gone on long enough. We finally have a plan that could make universal access a reality. AAPA endorses the goals and principles of President Clinton's plan. It is the most comprehensive health care reform plan yet proposed.
 There are too many men, women and children in the United States without adequate care. The Clinton plan addresses the need for greater access to quality medical services.
 There are too many conflicting interests in today's health care system. The Clinton plan outlines a team approach to health care that focuses on the needs of the patients.
 There are too many communities today lacking health care services. The Clinton plan encourages using a mix of health care providers in rural and urban areas.
 AAPA recognizes that changes will be made to the plan as it is debated in Congress. We will be actively working to retain those elements in the proposal that promote universal access, that provide comprehensive primary and preventative care, that ensure fair and equitable cost controls, that allow patient choice of providers and that enhance access to health care services performed by physician assistants and other non-physician providers.
 The president's health care reform plan acknowledges that physician assistants (PAs) are essential to the delivery of primary and preventative health care services to an increasing number of people. The proposal calls for doubling the number of PA graduates by increasing federal funding for PA programs. It encourages the adoption of state laws to increase utilization of PAs. It also includes tax credits for PAs who work in rural communities.
 AAPA represents the more than 27,000 physician assistants in the United States and the armed forces. PAs are educated to provide health care services that traditionally have been provided only by physicians. PAs practice medicine with the supervision of physicians, though most state laws provide for supervision to occur by telephone or radio. Approximately 57 percent of all physician assistants provide primary care services and approximately one-third work in communities with fewer than 50,000 people.
 -0- 9/22/93
 /CONTACT: Nancy Hughes of the American Academy of Physician Assistants, 703-836-2272, ext. 3505, or home, 703-549-2624/


CO: American Academy of Physician Assistants ST: Virginia IN: HEA SU: EXE

DT-KD -- DC022 -- 4841 09/22/93 16:04 EDT
COPYRIGHT 1993 PR Newswire Association LLC
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1993 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:PR Newswire
Date:Sep 22, 1993
Words:422
Previous Article:OUR VIEW: A SUMMARY OF COMMUNITY MUTUAL'S ANALYSIS OF PRESIDENT CLINTON'S HEALTH CARE REFORM PROPOSAL
Next Article:CRESTAR TO ACQUIRE PROVIDENCE SAVINGS & LOAN
Topics:

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters