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PEOPLE IN POLITICAL SCIENCE.

Activities

W. Lance Bennett, professor of political science, University of Washington, served as the Visiting Professor in the Laurence M. Lombard Chair during the fall semester of 1999 at Harvard University. He taught a course on "Strategic Communication and the Personalization of Politics."

Steven J. Brains, professor of politics, New York University, was awarded U.S. patent 5,983,205 for a fair-division procedure called "adjusted winner." The algorithm for this procedure is described and illustrated in Fair Division: From Cake-Cutting to Dispute Resolution (Cambridge University Press, 1996) and The Win-Win Solution: Guaranteeing Fair Shares to Everybody (W.W. Norton, 1999), both of which Brams co-authored with Alan D. Taylor, a mathematician at Union College and co-holder of the patent. The patent is assigned to New York University and is believed to be the first patent awarded for a dispute-resolution or legal procedure.

Barbara S. Romzek, professor of public administration, University of Kansas, presented "Dynamics of Public Sector Accountability in an Era of Reform" in London at the annual meeting of the International Institute of Administrative Sciences.

Administrative Appointments

Louis DiSipio, interim director, Latino/Latina studies program, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

Gary L. Gregg, Mitch McConnell Chair in Leadership, department of political science, University of Louisville. Gregg has also been appointed director of the McConnell Center for Political Leadership.

Bruce Jacobs, university dean of graduate studies, University of Rochester. Jacobs remains a professor of political science and public policy at the university.

Nance Lucas, director, James MacGregor Burns Academy of Leadership, University of Maryland.

Rev. Thomas J. O'Hara, CSC, president, King's College (PA).

Cindy Simon Rosenthal, assistant director, Carl Albert Congressional Research and Studies Center, University of Oklahoma.

Gregory T. Russell, director, graduate programs, department of political science, University of Oklahoma.

New Appointments

Karen R. Adams, instructor, department of political science, Louisiana State University.

Steve Brown, department of political science, Auburn University.

Andrea L. Campbell, assistant professor, department of government, Harvard University.

John W. Cavanaugh, program officer, Charles F. Kettering Foundation; formerly, University of South Carolina.

Kathleen Dolan, associate professor, department of political science, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; formerly, University of Wisconsin, Oshkosh.

Johnny Green, assistant professor, Auburn University.

Lori J. Hausegger, assistant professor, department of political science, Louisiana State University.

Robert E. Hogan, assistant professor, department of political science, Louisiana State University.

Glen S. Krutz, assistant professor, department of political science, Arizona State University.

Paul S. Martin, assistant professor, department of political science, University of Oklahoma.

James P. Melcher, assistant professor, department of political science, University of Maine, Farmington. Melcher also served as visiting assistant professor at Cleveland State University for the spring semester of 1999 and was awarded the Distinguished Faculty Award from the Cleveland State University Student Alumni Association.

Christopher P. Muste, instructor, department of political science, Louisiana State University.

Jefferey M. Sellers, assistant professor, department of political science, University of Southern California.

Adam Sheingate, assistant professor of political science, Johns Hopkins University.

Hendrik Spruyt, associate professor, department of political science, Arizona State University.

Cameron G. Thies, assistant professor, department of political science, Louisiana State University.

David M. Van Slyke, assistant professor of public administration and urban studies, Andrew Young School of Policy Studies, Georgia State University.

Peter W. Wielhouwer, associate professor of government and coordinator, masters program in political management, Robertson School of Government, Regent University; formerly, Spelman College.

Promotions

Ronald Keith Gaddie, associate professor with tenure, department of political science, University of Oklahoma.

M.V. Rajeev Gowda, associate professor with tenure, department of political science, University of Oklahoma.

Allen D. Hertzke, professor of political science, University of Oklahoma.

Richard G. Niemi, Don Alonzo Watson Professor of Political Science, department of political science, University of Rochester.

Retirements

E. Ramon Arango, professor, department of political science, Louisiana State University.

James J. Bolner Sr., professor, department of political science, Louisiana State University.

Roger H. Davidson, emeritus professor of government and politics, University of Maryland; currently, visiting professor of political science, University of California, Santa Barbara.

Jack R. Van Der Slik, emeritus professor of political studies and public affairs, University of Illinois, Springfield. Van Der Slik stepped down as director of the Illinois Legislative Studies Center at the university in December 1998.

Visiting and Temporary Positions

Paul M.A. Baker, visiting assistant professor of public policy, School of Public Policy, Georgia Tech; formerly, George Mason University.

Alexander Cooley, visiting assistant professor of political science, Johns Hopkins University.

William Gormley, Washington Distinguished Scholar, department of political science, Johns Hopkins University; currently at Georgetown University.

Mark Groombridge, visiting assistant professor of political science, Johns Hopkins University.

Jonathan Hopkin, visiting lecturer, Johns Hopkins University; currently at University of Birmingham.

Ruth A. Watry, visiting assistant professor, West Virginia University.

Awards

Fulbright Foundation Names 1999 Winners

The J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board and the Department of State have announced the names of more than 700 U.S. academics, professionals, and independent scholars who have received Fulbright awards to lecture, consult, or conduct research abroad in 1999-2000. Those political science scholars awarded scholarships are listed here with their home institution and the country in which they will be studying.

Peter J. Ahrensdorf, associate professor of political science, Davidson College: Argentina.

Stephanie B. Anderson, assistant professor of government, Bentley College: South Korea.

Lisa M. Aubrey, assistant professor of political science, Ohio University: Ghana.

David L. Bartlett, consultant, Madison, Wisconsin: Uzbekistan.

Michael A. Baum, assistant professor of political science, University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth: Portugal.

Patricia Ann Boling, associate professor of political science, Purdue University: Japan.

Charles D. Brockett, professor of political science, University of the South: Guatemala.

Nathan J. Brown, associate dean of the school of international affairs, George Washington University: Israel.

Julie M. Bunck, associate professor of political science, University of Louisville: Japan.

Charles E. Butterworth, professor of government and politics, University of Maryland, College Park: Germany.

Jeffrey W. Cason, assistant professor of political science, Middlebury College: Uruguay.

Gaye Christoffersen, independent scholar, Honolulu: China.

Terry D. Clark, professor of political science and international studies, Creighton University: Lithuania.

John F. Clark, associate professor of international relations, Florida International University: Uganda.

Thomas S. DeLuca Jr., associate professor of political science, Fordham University: China.

James W. Derleth, assistant professor of international studies, University of the Pacific: China.

John C. Dugas, assistant professor of political science, Kalamazoo College: Colombia.

Cary H. Federman, assistant professor of political science, Duquesne University: Croatia.

Patricia M. Ferraioli, assistant professor of government, Skidmore College: Canada.

Elizabeth A.E. Garbrah-Aidoo, assistant professor of political science, James Madison University: Egypt.

Michael T. Gibbons, associate professor of government and international affairs, University of South Florida: Czech Republic.

Robert M. Hurley, professor of criminal justice, California State University, Sacramento: Georgia.

Lucky Osagie Imade, assistant professor of international studies, Shaw University: Nigeria.

Patrick Ireland, associate professor of international studies, University of Denver: Morocco.

J. Scott Johnson, assistant professor of political science, Saint John's University (MN): Czech Republic.

Carlos E. Juarez, assistant professor of political science, Hawaii Pacific University: Mexico.

Nuket Kardam, associate professor of international policy studies, Monterey Institute of International Studies: Turkey.

Charles D. Kenney, assistant professor of political science, University of Oklahoma: Peru.

Dwight Y. King, associate professor and director of the department of political science, Northern Illinois University: Indonesia.

Andrzej Korbouski, professor of political science, University of California, Los Angeles: Poland.

David A. Kowalewski, professor of social science, Alfred University: Kenya.

Ann Mosely Lesch, professor of political science, Villanova University: Egypt.

James P. Lester, director, Policy Studies Institute, Colorado State University: Germany.

Carl J. Luna, professor of social sciences, San Diego Mesa College: Russia.

Daniel C. Lynch, assistant professor of international relations, University of Southern California: Thailand.

John G. Mason, associate professor of political science, William Paterson University: France.

Patricia Lee Masters, political science, Antioch University: Sri Lanka.

David J. Menefee-Libby, associate professor of politics, Pomona College: Ireland.

Beata Kovacs Nas, research associate, Sasakawa Peace Foundation, USA: Hungary.

James A. Nathan, visiting scholar in political science, Auburn University, Montgomery: China.

Augustus R. Norton, professor of international relations, Boston University: Egypt.

John R. O'Neal, associate professor of political science, University of Alabama: Norway.

Godwin O. Okafor, assistant professor of political science, Georgia Southern University: Nigeria.

Roger Paget, professor of political science, Lewis and Clark College: Indonesia.

Ann L. Phillips, assistant professor of international service, American University: Germany.

David Plotke, associate professor and chair of political science, New School for Social Research: Sweden.

Peter Rutland, professor of government, Wesleyan University: Russia.

James D. Savage, associate professor of government, University of Virginia: Luxembourg.

John T. Scholz, professor of political science, Stony Brook, SUNY: Nepal.

Herman M. Schwartz, associate professor of government and foreign affairs, University of Virginia: Canada.

Catherine V. Scott, professor of political science, Agnes Scott College: South Africa.

Francis S. Singleton, professor of politics and government, Pacific University: Vietnam.

Tony Smith, professor of political science, Tufts University: Guatemala.

Peverill Squire, professor of political science, University of Iowa: Hungary.

Donley T. Studlar, professor of political science, West Virginia University: Canada.

Aron G. Tannebaum, professor of history and political science, Lander University: Russia.

Edward H. Thomas, independent scholar, Austin, Texas: Uzbekistan.

Charles P. Tien, assistant professor of political science, Hunter College, CUNY: China.

Thom A. Travis, professor of international relations, Bucknell University: Russia.

Andrew Valls, assistant professor of political science, Morehouse College: Estonia.

AAASS Honors Scholars

The American Association for the Advancement of Slavic Studies recently presented its annual awards as part of the AAASS meeting in St. Louis. Three APSA members were among the honorees.

Robert C. Tucker, IBM Professor Emeritus, Princeton University, received AAASS's highest honor for Distinguished Contributions to Slavic Studies in recognition of his efforts to help shape U.S. policy toward Stalin's Russia and to explain to the world the dynamics of Stalinist, post-Stalinist, and post-Soviet regimes.

Lt. Gen. William E. Odom, Hudson Institute, was named cowinner of the Marshall Shulman Book Prize for The Collapse of the Soviet Military (Yale University Press). The prize is awarded to the author of an outstanding monograph on Soviet and/or post-Soviet foreign policy.

Ilya Prizel, Associate Professor of Russian Area and East European Studies, Johns Hopkins University, also received the Shulman prize for his book, National Identity and Foreign Policy: Nationalism and Leadership in Poland, Russia and Ukraine (Cambridge University Press). Ford Foundation Fellowships Awarded

Seven younger members of APSA received 1999 Ford Foundation Minority Fellowships from the National Academies, a group that represents the interests of the National Academy of Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, National Research Council, and Institute of Medicine. The fellowships, awarded in predoctoral, dissertation, and postdoctoral categories, are given to scholars who demonstrate merit and promise for future achievement. The purpose of the award is to increase the presence of underrepresented minority groups on the nation's college and university faculties. For more information, visit the National Academies fellowships page (http://www4.ns.edu!osep/fo.nsf).

Predoctoral Fellows

Rodolfo Espino, University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Melvin Lee Rogers, Yale University.

Dissertation Fellows

Emily Doris Edmonds, University of California, San Diego.

Avis Alexandria Jones-DeWeever, University of Maryland, College Park.

Valeria N. Sinclair-Chapman, Ohio State University.

Kim Michelle Williams, Cornell University.

Postdoctoral Fellow

Todd Cameron Shaw, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.

Other Awards

Kristi Andersen, professor and chair of the department of political science at Syracuse University was named a Maxwell Professor of Teaching Excellence at SU in recognition of her sustained contributions to the Maxwell School's students and teaching community.

G. Robert Boynton, professor of political science, University of Iowa, has been awarded a grant for political communication technology from the National Science Foundation for 1999-2001.

Vicki L. Hesli, associate professor, department of political science, University of Iowa, has been awarded a grant from the United States Information Agency for a partnership program with Taras Shevchenko National University of Kyiv in Ukraine, for three years beginning August 1999.

Chun-tu Hsueh, president, Huang Hsing Foundation (USA), and adviser, Churchill College of Cambridge University, received a Doctor Honoris Causa from the Russian Academy of Sciences. He was also elected a foreign member of the Russian Academy of Natural Sciences.

Lawrence D. Longley, professor, Lawrence University (WI), has been awarded the Fulbright Thomas Jefferson Chair in American Social Studies for The Netherlands. He will spend the fall of 2000 based at a Nijmegen University and lecturing throughout the country.

Cindy Simon Rosenthal, department of political science, University of Oklahoma, was named the 1999 recipient of the Irene Rothbaum Award, given to the most outstanding assistant professor in the College of Arts and Sciences. The award is based on "distinguished teaching as demonstrated through scholarship, dedication, and the ability to inspire students to high levels of academic achievement."

David Samuels, assistant professor, department of political science, University of Minnesota, received the prestigious McKnight Land-Grant Professorship award from the McKnight Foundation. This award recognizes junior faculty and provides funding to support the individual's research. Recipients of this award are chosen for "the degree to which their past achievements and current ideas demonstrate originality, imagination, and innovation."

Donley T. Studlar, Eberly Distinguished Professor of Political Science, West Virginia University, received a Fulbright Scholar Lecture and Award to Canada. He will spend the spring and summer of 2000 at the University of Toronto working on "Comparative Public Policy: Canadian and U.S. Policy on Tobacco Regulation."

John Sullivan, professor of political science, University of Minnesota, was appointed Regents' Professor.

Ross Talbot, professor emeritus of political science, Iowa State University, was the 1999 recipient of the Vernon Van Dyke Award, presented by the Iowa Conference of Political Scientists at its annual meeting.

Nina Tannenwald, Joukowsky Family Assistant Professor of International Relations, Watson Institute for International Studies, Brown University, has been awarded a grant from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation. Her research will examine how certain weapons such as landmines become acceptable for use by "civilized" nations. The research builds upon the book she is completing, The Nuclear Taboo.

Raimo Vayrynen, department of government and international studies, University of Notre Dame, received the 1999 Urho Kekkonen Prize for "sustained contributions to international relations."

Christina Wolbrecht, department of government and international studies, University of Notre Dame, received the 1999 Carrie Chapman Catt Prize for Research on Women and Politics from the Carrie Chapman Catt Center for Women and Politics at Iowa State University.

Heinz Eulau, William Bennett Munro Professor of political Science, Stanford University, received the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research's 1999 Warren E. Miller Award "for meritorious service to the social sciences." A founding member of the ICPSR, Eulau also chaired its council from 1968 to 1970, and has served as ICPSR's associate director since 1975.

Eulau received his Ph.D. in political science from the University of California, Berkeley in 1941. He spent the war years as a senior organization and propaganda analyst for the Special War Policis Unit of the U.S. Department of Justice, then worked as an assistant editor of The New Republic from 1944 until 1947.

He had held professorships at Antioch College and Stanford University, and been a fellow or visiting scholar at over a dozen other institutions. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1972 and served as APSA president in 1971-72.

Eulau has authored or edited 19 books, including The Legislative System: Explorations in Legislative Behavior (1962, with John C. Wahlke), Labyrinths of Democracy: Adaptations, Linkages, Representations, and Policies in Urban Politics (1973, with Kenneth Prewitt), Micro-Macro Dilemmas in Political Science (1996), and The Politics of Academic culture: Foibles, Fables, and Facts (1998). In honor of his scholarly contributions, which includes stints as editor of International Yearbook of Political Behavior Research (1961-67) and the journal Political Behavior (1980-90), APSA named its annual award for the best article published in the American Political Science Review the "Heinz Eulau Award" in 1986.

Bob Darcy, Regents Professor of Political Science and Statistics, Oklahoma State University, received the Oklahoma Bar Association's Liberty Bell Award for his work on judicial evaluation and for furthering judicial independence in Oklahoma. The week prior to receiving the award, Darcy delivered the keynote address at a colloquium on the Clinton years hosted by the U.S. Embassy in London.

Debra W. Stewart, vice chancellor and dean, Graduate School, North Carolina State University, will become the new president of the Council of Graduate Schools (CGS) in Washington, DC, on July 1, 2000. CGS represents 435 member institutions' interests and sets standards for graduate education, initiates reforms, and shapes policy. CGS's members confer 99% of the doctoral degrees in the United States and nearly 80% of the master's degrees.

Jerome M. Mileur, professor of political science, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, will have a collection of the papers he kept during his 13 years of owning the Harrisburg Senators (nee Nashua Angels/Pirates; nee Holyoke Millers) added to the official archives of the National Baseball Hall of Fame. The "Jerome M. Mileur Papers" detail a time of rapid transformation and affiliation in the minors and are the first of their kind to be catalogued by the Hall.

Richard A. Couto, George Matthews and Virginia Brinkley Madlin Chair in Leadership Studies at the University of Richmond, was recently named winner of the Ernest A. Lynton Award for Faculty Professional Service and Academic Outreach. Presented by the New England Resource Center for Higher Education, the prize recognizes a faculty member who connects his or her expertise and scholarship to community outreach.

Bruce W. Jentleson, former director, Washington Center, University of California, Davis, has been named director of the Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy at Duke University. He will also be a professor of public policy studies and political science at Duke. He is (and will continue as) an adviser to the Clinton administration on issues related to regional security, arms control, and preventive diplomacy in the Middle East.

Barbara S. Romzek, professor of public administration at the University of Kansas, has been selected as a fellow of the National Academy for Public Administration. Romzek was chosen in recognition of her contributions to public administration scholarship, particularly with respect to theories of public accountability.

Paul J. Weber, professor of political science, Louisville University, has been appointed executive director of the university's Grawemeyer Awards. Weber will oversee the awarding of five prestigious annual prizes, including the Award for Ideas Improving World Order. He was most recently associate dean of Louisville's College of Arts and Sciences.

Margaret G. Hermann has been appointed Gerald B. and Daphne Cramer Professor of Global Affairs in the Maxwell School of Citizenship and Public Affairs at Syracuse University.

James A. Thurber, director, Center for Congressional and Presidential Studies, American University, delivered the Charles S. Hyneman Lecture at Indiana University this past October. In an address titled "Improving Campaign Conduct: The Role of Political Consultants in U.S. Politics," he reported findings from a long-term research project funded by the Pew Charitable Trusts.

G. Bingham Powell, has been appointed the Marie Curran Wilson and Joseph Chamberlin Wilson Professor of Political Science at the University of Rochester. A member of the UR faculty for almost 30 years, Powell is a preeminent scholar of comparative politics, publishing numerous books and articles. His latest book, Elections as Instruments of Democracy: Majoritarian and Proportional Visions, will be published this spring.

Political Scientist on the Bench

Robert Katzmann, Col. W. Walsh Professor of American Government and professor of public policy at Georgetown University was recently appointed to the federal Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, which has jurisdiction in Connecticut, New York, and Vermont. Katzmann, who Sen. Daniel Patrick Moynihan (D-NY) praised as "the finest lawyer/scholar of his generation," was previously a visiting fellow at and acting director of the governmental studies program at The Brookings Institution. Katzmann's work has focused on several subjects, including regulation, the administrative process, antitrust policy, judicial-congressional relations, court reform and the legal profession. Among his books are Regulatory Bureaucracy: The Federal Trade Commission and Antitrust Policy and Managing Appeals in Federal Court (coedited with Michael Tonry).

Political Scientists "Improving World Order"

Margaret Keck and Kathryn Sikkink shared the 1999 Grawemeyer Award far Ideas Improving World Order. Given by the University of Louisville, the award seeks to stimulate proposals that can lead to a more just and peaceful world. Keck and Sikkink believe that nongovernmental organizations such as Amnesty international and the Environmental Defense Fund are playing a leading role toward this goal. They were recognized for coauthoring Activists Beyond Borders (Cornell University Press, 1998). The book offers a framework for understanding the role of non-government organizations in bringing about international change.

Keck is a professor of political science at Johns Hopkins University, where she has been on the faculty since 1995. She holds a Ph.D. in political science from Columbia University and a degree in international relations from the Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium. Author of The Workers' Party' and Democratization in Brazil (Yale University Press, 1992), she is currently completing a book on environmental politics in Brazil.

Sikkink, a professor of political science at the University of Minnesota, holds a master's degree and Ph.D. in political science from Columbia University. Her other works include, The Power of Human Rights: International Norms and Domestic Change, coedited with Thomas Risse and Stephen Ropp.

The Grawemeyer Foundation at the University of Louisville awards $200,000 each year for works in music composition, education, ideas improving world order and, beginning in 2001, psychology.

KUDOS

Stephen L. Fisher, professor of political science, Emory & Henry College, was named College Professor of the Year for 1999-2000 by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching and the Council for Advancement and Support of Teaching (CASE). As the representative of faculty at baccalaureate institutions, he joined three other winners representing, respectively, community colleges, master's institutions, and doctoral institutions.

A member of the Emory & Henry faculty since 1971, Fisher received special praise for establishing a new major in pubic policy and community service at the school and for founding the college's Appalachian Center for Community Service. Students in the program, which graduated its first five students last spring, are required to complete a community-based senior project.

Fisher's work is motivated by his belief that "It's not enough just to serve, but to be willing to change the conditions in which you serve. A thriving democracy requires educational institutions that are committed to fostering citizens who are prepared to build community and work for the common good."

He has received several awards for excellence in teaching. He has twice been named professor of the year by the students at Emory & Henry and has been a recipient of Virginia's State Council for Higher Education's Outstanding Faculty Award.
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Publication:PS: Political Science & Politics
Article Type:Brief Article
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Mar 1, 2000
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