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PCB-RELATED INJURY CLAIMS ARE RULED UNFOUNDED

 PCB-RELATED INJURY CLAIMS ARE RULED UNFOUNDED
 PHILADELPHIA, Oct. 26 /PRNewswire/ -- In a series of rulings issued


Oct. 22, a federal judge in Philadelphia has again dismissed claims of PCB-related injury brought by more than 30 residents living adjacent to the Paoli Railroad Yard, located about 30 miles from downtown Philadelphia.
 U.S. District Judge Robert G. Kelly, whose dismissal of the same claims four years ago was remanded by the federal circuit court for further hearings and more detailed findings, said the plaintiffs' experts had failed to produce reliable evidence that the plaintiffs had been exposed to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) or that they had incurred any PCB-related injuries.
 PCBs had been used for years in rail car transformers, and concentrations of PCBs were found in the soil of residential properties adjoining the rail yard, now operated by Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) and owned by Amtrak. Prior operators were Conrail, Penn Central Transportation Company and the Pennsylvania Railroad.
 Roger F. Cox and Jerome R. Richter of Blank, Rome, Comisky & McCauley, Philadelphia, attorneys for SEPTA, said, "We believe Judge Kelly's decision was correct, and that his reasoning would withstand appellate review."
 Named as defendants, in addition to SEPTA, Conrail and Amtrak, were Monsanto (principal U.S. producer of PCBs), General Electric and Westinghouse (producers of rail car transformers and PCB transformer fluid suppliers), Budd Co. (supplier of rail cars) and the City of Philadelphia (owner of certain rail cars).
 Plaintiffs in the actions seek millions of dollars in damages for alleged injuries, and also seek damages for future medical monitoring.
 Conrail previously entered into a $1 million settlement with residents of areas adjacent to the yard and employees who worked there since 1976.
 In a series of opinions totaling about 240 pages, Kelly said the opinions of various expert witnesses offered by plaintiffs were inadmissible, because the experts used unreliable methodologies and data in reaching their opinions, and were not properly qualified. "Without competent expert testimony," Kelly said, "plaintiffs had failed to establish that they had ingested PCBs into their bodies and that PCBs had caused them injury."
 /delval/
 -0- 10/26/92
 /CONTACT: Mark Heil of Blank, Rome, Comisky & McCauley, 215-569-5684/ CO: Blank, Rome, Comisky & McCauley; Southeastern Pennsylvania
 Transportation Authority; Amtrak ST: Pennsylvania IN: TRN SU:


MK-MP -- PH002 -- 4595 10/26/92 09:21 EST
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Date:Oct 26, 1992
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