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Our children's well-being.

More kids are finishing high school. The teen birth rate is dropping. And fewer children live in single-parent households. That's good news.

But 4 million children--an increase of more than 1 million since 2000--live with parents who face persistent unemployment and poverty. More babies are being born at low birth weights and infant mortality and teen death rates are up. These are among the findings of the latest Kids Count Data Book released in 2005 by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

The book, in its 16th year, tracks the well-being of children and families in all 50 states and Puerto Rico using federal government statistics. This is the best state-level data available for tracking yearly changes in the categories studied, but some are derived from samples and may contain some random error. For more information, go to www.kidscount.org.
WHERE THE DIFFERENCES ARE

The size of the gap between black and non-Hispanic white children
varies by indicator, but the outcomes for black children are worse
on every one of the 10 measurements. The same is true for American
Indian and Alaskan Native children when compared b non-Hispanic
whites.

 Non-Hispanic
 Total White

Percent low-birth weight babies 2002 7.8% 6.9%
Infant mortality rate 2002 7.0 5.8
 (deaths per 1,000 live births)
Child death rate (deaths per 2002 21 19
 100,000 children ages 1-14)
Teen death rate (deaths per 100,000 2002 68 66
 teens ages 15-19)
Teen birth rate (births per 1,000 2002 43 29
 females ages 15-19)
Percent of teens who are high 2003 8 6
 school dropouts (ages 16-19) *
Percent of teens not attending 2003 9 7
 school and not working
 (ages 16-19) *
Percent of children living in 2003 33 26
 families where no parent has
 full-time, year-round
 employment *
Percent of children in poverty * 2003 18 10
Percent of children in 2003 30 22
 single-parent households *

 Black/African
 American Hispanic/Latino

Percent low-birth weight babies 13.3% 6.5%
Infant mortality rate 13.8 5.6
 (deaths per 1,000 live births)
Child death rate (deaths per 31 20
 100,000 children ages 1-14)
Teen death rate (deaths per 100,000 82 65
 teens ages 15-19)
Teen birth rate (births per 1,000 67 83
 females ages 15-19)
Percent of teens who are high 8 15
 school dropouts (ages 16-19) *
Percent of teens not attending 12 13
 school and not working
 (ages 16-19) *
Percent of children living in 50 38
 families where no parent has
 full-time, year-round
 employment *
Percent of children in poverty * 34 28
Percent of children in 62 34
 single-parent households *

 Asian and American Indian
 Pacific and Alaskan
 Islander Native

Percent low-birth weight babies 7.8% 7.2%
Infant mortality rate 4.8 8.6
 (deaths per 1,000 live births)
Child death rate (deaths per 16 28
 100,000 children ages 1-14)
Teen death rate (deaths per 100,000 37 91
 teens ages 15-19)
Teen birth rate (births per 1,000 18 54
 females ages 15-19)
Percent of teens who are high 3 11
 school dropouts (ages 16-19) *
Percent of teens not attending 5 13
 school and not working
 (ages 16-19) *
Percent of children living in 31 51
 families where no parent has
 full-time, year-round
 employment *
Percent of children in poverty * 13 32
Percent of children in 16 45 *
 single-parent households *

* For this measure, the data for non-Hispanic whites, black/African
Americans, Asians and Pacific Islanders, and American Indians and
Alaskan Natives are for persons who selected only one race.

Source: The Annie E. Casey Foundation www.kidscount.org.
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Title Annotation:STATESTATS; social and demographic conditions
Publication:State Legislatures
Article Type:Illustration
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jan 1, 2006
Words:590
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