Printer Friendly

Op twin loses battle for life; FAMILY: Tot separated by surgery dies 4 weeks after birth.

Byline: By Crystal Deane

MIDLAND cojioned twin Faith Williams has lost her battle for life, four weeks after she was born.

Faith survived surgery to separate her from twin sister Hope but died yesterday "from the complexities of her condition".

Professor Agostino Pierro, head of Great Ormond Street Hospital's surgical team, said: "She required the full range of skills of our intensive care staff and underwent a number of further procedures.

"However, she succumbed to the complexities of her condition."

The twins were born on November 26.

Hope died following surgery to separate them at the beginning of the month.

They were joined from the breastbone to the top of the navel and had a shared liver but separate hearts.

Their parents Aled Williams, aged 28, and mother Laura, 18, from Shrewsbury, Shropshire, maintained a constant vigil at their bedside.

Mrs Williams is Britain's youngest mother to give birth to conjoined twins.

Prof Pierro said: "While this is a sad outcome, it is not an unexpected one."

Faith underwent surgery earlier this month to assist with her circulation.

"The aim was to ensure more blood flows to her body and less through her lungs," a spokeswoman for the hospital said.

Following the heart surgery the baby had another operation to close her chest.

Hope failed to survive the initial operation to separate her from Faith because her lungs were too small to support her breathing.

A hospital spokesman said: "Mr and Mrs Williams have asked us to say that they were very happy with the care they and their children received at Great Ormond Street."

Factfile

SEPARATING conjoined twins is an intricate procedure heavily dependent on which vital organs the infants share.

If conjoined twins can be parted and both have a chance of survival, the greatest risks are undergoing anaesthesia and surgical complications and infections.

The critical period after surgery lasts three to four days.

Great Ormond Street is the most experienced centre in Europe for separating twins.

The survival rate for operations where the separation is planned and both children are otherwise well is more than 80 per cent.

CAPTION(S):

Conjoined twins Faith and Hope Williams and (inset their parents) Aled and Laura Williams.
COPYRIGHT 2008 Birmingham Post & Mail Ltd
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2008 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Birmingham Mail (England)
Date:Dec 27, 2008
Words:367
Previous Article:Quiz Of The Day.
Next Article:Ex-wife among eight killed.
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2021 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters