Printer Friendly

One of the few welcome consequences of the September 11 events is that stories about Rep. Gary Condit have been driven off the air.

One of the few welcome consequences of the September 11 events is that stories about Rep. Gary Condit have been driven off the air. Until the attack, network camera crews remained staked out in front of Condit's apartment in Washington's Adams Morgan neighborhood 18 hours a day, even on days when there was literally no news to report. The crews--who lounged in the shade in bag chairs, munching on company-paid sweet-and-sour chicken, and chatting with locals--didn't seem to mind. Many had grown accustomed to the long, monotonous days covering Washington's serial scandals. And the overtime pay helped. A microwave technician with one of the cable networks said he is "living in the house that Monica built."
COPYRIGHT 2001 Washington Monthly Company
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2001, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Author:GLASTRIS, PAUL
Publication:Washington Monthly
Article Type:Brief Article
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Oct 1, 2001
Words:116
Previous Article:One of the Rules of Washington Punditry is that if you're important enough to get on NBC's Meet the Press there's no point in going on C-SPAN.
Next Article:Publisher Perish.
Topics:


Related Articles
For immediate release: four ways to sell your senator.
Who's Who.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2020 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters