Printer Friendly

On the death of Martin Luther King, Jr.

What we need...is not division...not violence...but love and wisdom, and compassion.

On April 4, 1968, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., was assassinated in Memphis. That evening, Senator Robert Kennedy was scheduled to speak in a poor black neighborhood in Indianapolis on behalf of his campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination. The police warned Kennedy not to go that night, since they could not guarantee his safety. When Kennedy arrived, he realized that the crowd had not heard about King's assassination. His spontaneous remarks that evening reflected the personal loss that he had sustained when his own brother was killed by a sniper's bullet.

Three months later, on June 4, 1968, Kennedy celebrated a major triumph in the important California primary. He seemed to be headed for the Democratic nomination on the night that he addressed his followers in Los Angeles' Ambassador Hotel. As he left through a kitchen hallway, he was shot by an embittered Palestinian immigrant; he died two days later.

I have bad news for you, for all of our fellow citizens, and people who love peace all over the world, and that is that Martin Luther King was shot and killed tonight.

Martin Luther King dedicated his life to love and to justice for his fellow human beings, and he died because of that effort.

In this difficult day, in this difficult time for the United States, it is perhaps well to ask what kind of a nation we are and what direction we want to move in. For those of you who are black--considering the evidence there evidently is that there were white people who were responsible--you can be filled with bitterness, with hatred, and a desire for revenge. We can move in that direction as a country, in great polarization--black people amongst black, white people amongst white, filled with hatred toward one another.

Or we can make an effort, as Martin Luther King did, to understand and to comprehend, and to replace that violence, that stain of bloodshed that has spread across our land, with an effort to understand with compassion and love.

For those of you who are black and are tempted to be filled with hatred and distrust at the injustice of such an act, against all white people, I can only say that I feel in my own heart the same kind of feeling. I had a member of my family killed, but he was killed by a white man. But we have to make an effort in the United States, we have to make an effort to understand, to go beyond these rather difficult times.

My favorite poet was Aeschylus. He wrote: "In our sleep, pain which cannot forget falls drop by drop upon the heart until, in our own despair, against our will, comes wisdom through the awful grace of God."

What we need in the United States is not division; what we need in the United States is not hatred; what we need in the United States is not violence or lawlessness, but love and wisdom, and compassion toward one another, and a feeling of justice towards those who still suffer within our country, whether they be white or they be black.

So I shall ask you tonight to return home, to say a prayer for the family of Martin Luther King, that's true, but more importantly to say a prayer for our own country, which all of us love--a prayer for understanding and that compassion of which I spoke.

We can do well in this country. We will have difficult times. We've had difficult times in the past. We will have difficult times in the future. It is not the end of violence; it is not the end of lawlessness; it is not the end of disorder.

But the vast majority of white people and the vast majority of black people in this country want to live together, want to improve the quality of our life, and want justice for all human beings who abide in our land.

Let us dedicate ourselves to what the Greeks wrote so many years ago: to tame the savageness of man and to make gentle the life of this world.

Let us dedicate ourselves to that, and say a prayer for our country and for our people.
COPYRIGHT 1991 COPYRIGHT 1990 Diane Ravitch
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1991 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Robert F. Kennedy's spontaneous 1968 speech
Publication:The American Reader
Article Type:Transcript
Date:Jan 1, 1991
Words:718
Previous Article:Against the war in Vietnam.
Next Article:Stupid America.
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2019 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters