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Obituaries.

Donald D. Jones

73, Died Nov. 5

FORMER EDITOR OF THE KANSAS CITY (MO.) TIMES AND THE KANSAS CITY STAR

A passionate newspaper- man whose blue pencil left an indelible mark on The Kansas City Times and its staff, Donald Jones died Nov. 5 of bone marrow cancer He was 73.

Jones joined the Times, the former morning sister of the Star, in 1949. After returning from Naval service in the Korean War, he rose to news editor, night city editor, assistant managing editor, and national editor. "Casey" Jones, as he was known around the newsroom, ensured stories were tight and sweet, cutting items "almost like Zorro," noted former staffer James B. Steele. "You would think somebody massacred your copy. But when you read it ... not a thing had been lost."

In 1982, Jones became the first ombudsman for the Times and the Star. The papers' staff was ever mindful of his in-house note, the "Casey- gram," which provided a daily, often biting, critique.

Bill Bebout

64, Died Oct. 22

FORMER EDITOR AND REPORTER AT THE OREGON STATESMAN AND CAPITAL JOURNAL IN SALEM, ORE.

Bebout worked for The Register-Guard in Eugene, Ore., and The Associated Press prior to joining the morning and evening papers in Salem, now combined as the Statesman Journal. In 18 years as a reporter and later editorial page editor, Bebout won five first-place awards from the Oregon Newspaper Publishers Association. In 1961, with the AP in

in Idaho, he covered the funeral of Ernest Hemingway in remote Ketcham, stringing a phone line from the cemetery to dictate copy to the AP bureau in Salt Lake City.

Larry Fowler

88, Died Oct. 30

RETIRED MANAGING EDITOR OF THE DAILY NEWS IN LOS ANGELES

Fowler joined the Valley News and Greensheet as the city editor in 1954 and remained with the paper for two decades after it became the Daily News of Los Angeles. Fowler often worked from the early morning until 2 a.m because, as he once said, "real newspapermen work at night." Fowler got involved in nearly every aspect of editorial production from layout to copy editing. Under Fowler's direction, the paper expanded its coverage beyond the San Fernando Valley to Los Angeles City Hall and other areas. He retired in 1977 as managing editor.

George Hackett

82, Died Nov. 6

NEWSMAN FOR THE ASSOCIATED PRESS IN KENTUCKY SINCE 1944

A Louisville native, Hackett joined the AP bureau in his hometown in 1944 as a Wirephoto operator, and rose through the editorial ranks during his 56 years at the wire service, with stints as news editor and, most recently, Kentucky enterprise editor. He was presented the Distinguished Service of Journalism award by Western Kentucky University. In 1988, he was inducted into the Kentucky Journalism Hall of Fame at the University of Kentucky. Ed Staats, AP's Louisville bureau chief, surmised that "George Hackett arguably wrote more stories read by more people than any other journalist in Kentucky."

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Title Annotation:includes multiple listing
Author:Santo, Jamie
Publication:Editor & Publisher
Article Type:Obituary
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Nov 13, 2000
Words:491
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