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OUTPOST.

Just bassin':Gary Griffith of Oxnard and Randy Wilson of Antelope Acres were the top anglers Saturday at the WON BASS Castaic Lake Super Team tournament.

The duo caught its 12.08-pound five-fish limit of largemouth bass, including a tourney-best 4.01-pounder, on six-inch purple Mr. Bill's plastic worms along the Sharon's Rest area of the lake to take $1,845 in prize money.

Recent leader-board regulars Jim Witowski and Chris Spicker of Castaic took second with 11.23 pounds for $1,175. Third went to Mike Rooke of Saugus and Shawn Weir of Castaic, who boated 10.83 pounds of bucketmouths for $985.

Beach party: Leo Carrillo State Beach in Malibu will host an old-fashioned campfire program on Saturday and a ranger-led nature walk Sunday.

The facility's amphitheater will be the site of slide shows, stories and songs around the fire beginning at 8 p.m. Bring marshmallows.

The next morning at 9, visitors can explore tide pools, coastal bluffs and the surrounding hillsides with a park ranger. Meet at the campground kiosk for the mile-long stroll.

Information: (818) 597-9192, ext. 201.

DU shoot: The San Gabriel Valley chapter of Ducks Unlimited will hold its seventh annual Sporting Clays Classic and Santa Maria-Style BBQ on Saturday at Pachmayr International Shooting Sports Park, 831 N. Rosemead Blvd. in El Monte.

Registration begins at 8 a.m. Fees range from $30 to $75; the barbecue only is $1. Proceeds benefit DU wetland habitat projects.

Information: (818) 309-6504 or (818) 248-6717.

Vols needed: Volunteers are being sought for a trail-maintenance project being conducted Saturday from 8:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Circle X Ranch in the Santa Monica Mountains.

All ages are invited to a day of restoring the Canyon View and Grotto trails. Information and directions: (818) 831-5555.

Fisheries plan: In accordance with an executive order signed by President Clinton in June 1995, the directors of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife and National Marine Fisheries services have issued a National Recreational Fishery Resources Conservation Plan.

The five-year proposal acknowledges the impact that recreational fisheries play in the country's social, cultural and economic well-being. It calls for increasing sportfishing opportunities across the nation by strengthening efforts to conserve, restore and enhance aquatic systems.

Copies of the plan are available by writing to: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Publications Unit, 4040 N. Fairfax Drive, Arlington, Va. 22203; or by calling (703) 358-1711.

Add fisheries: California is also launching an effort to restore a valued fishery - steelhead trout in Southern California.

``We're starting on the south coast because that's where the stocks are most imperiled,'' said Department of Fish and Game biologist Dennis McEwan, co-author of the action plan.

Loss and degradation of steelhead habitat has brought about the disappearance of the fish from many Southland waters and severe declines in the populations of many others. The remedies concentrate on the Carmel, Santa Ynez, Ventura and Santa Clara rivers, as well as Malibu Creek.

``We believe that all these streams that historically supported steelhead populations have the potential for restoration or reintroduction,'' McEwan said.

The objective of the plan, issued earlier this year, is to increase natural production of steelhead - an oceangoing form of rainbow trout - and to improve angling and non-consumptive use. Toward that end, stream flows will be restored, water quality will be protected and access will be provided to historic habitat presently blocked.

Statewide, the DFG estimates the total steelhead population at about 250,000 adults, or less than half that of 1965. The decline has prompted national studies to determine if it warrants listing the fish under the Endangered Species Act.

Hunting safety: Although state hunters were involved in 15 hunting accidents in 1995, for the fourth straight year no fatalities were reported.

Therefore, according to the DFG, the sport remains safer than boating and bicycling from the standpoint of serious accidents.

In many of the accidents, the shooter did not see the victim or the victims shot themselves, officials said. Hunters were involved in one more accident than the previous year, but their record was better than in 1993, when there were 22 accidents, and in 1992, when there were 18.

Vehicle break-ins: Angeles National Forest officials are warning backcountry visitors to use caution when parking their vehicles in roadside turnouts and at trailheads.

Over the last weekend, there were four reports of vehicle break-ins, and during the week of June 8 through Friday there were more than 20 break-ins. Since the beginning of the year, some 100 incidents have been reported.

Thieves have recently targeted the Big Tujunga Canyon, Chantry Flats and Mount Gleason areas. Most burglaries occur from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

``Anyone visiting the forest should leave valuables at home or carry them on their person while recreating,'' said special agent Rita Wears. ``Don't leave them in your cars.''

Yosemite update: The winter icebox in the high country of Yosemite is rapidly defrosting, but one to three feet of snow still cover most areas above 7,000 feet.

Tuolumne Meadows is like a lake from the melt-off, many trails are under water and the Pacific Crest Trail is open only 5 miles to Glen Aulin, with the Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne and its wilderness waterfalls still inaccessible.

At the current rate of snowmelt, rangers are now predicting the wilderness out of Tuolumne Meadows will open to hiking and camping by mid-July.

Tails wanted: Sheldons' Inc., is looking for a few thousand good squirrel tails.

Sheldons' uses hair from the tails to dress the hooks of many of their Mepps bass, trout, panfish, pike and walleye lures. They either will purchase the tails or hunters can trade them for lures.

``The tails from squirrels harvested by legitimate hunters every year are just too valuable to go to waste,'' said Mepps spokesman Jim Martinsen.

Information: (715) 623-2382.
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Title Annotation:SPORTS
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Jun 20, 1996
Words:979
Previous Article:GIANTS USE RODS, NOT BATS, TO RELAX : BASEBALL PLAYERS HAVE TURNED TO SPORTFISHING IN THEIR TIME OFF.
Next Article:OUTLOOKS : SUMMER READING MADE FOR RELAXATION.


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