Printer Friendly

OFF THE TOP SHELF TIGER WOULD LIMBO, BUT HE'S GOT THE VAULT THING GOING.

Byline: - Tom Hoffarth

--First read: ``The Major: 7 Days at Golf's Greatest Championship,'' written and edited by Scott Brown with the staff of the Monterey County Herald ($37.50, Sleeping Bear Press, 176 pgs)

--Second read: ``Raising the Bar: The Championship Years of Tiger Woods,'' by Tim Rosaforte ($24.95, Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martin's Press, 309 pgs)

--Their relative importance: Trying to put Woods' beyond-belief golf feats into some sort of perspective for those of us who still don't understand what it all means.

The first coffee-table-sized work focuses not just on Woods' incredible U.S. Open win at Pebble Beach last June, but everything else which happened that week that could be forgotten - the tribute to the previous year's champion, the late Payne Stewart, and the farewell to Jack Nicklaus after the second round would have made this special in and of itself. Woods' record-setting tournament, as Tom Watson would say afterward, ``raised the bar and it seems that he's the only guy who can jump over that bar.'' (page 157).

Which leads nicely into the second book, by Rosaforte, a senior writer for Golf World magazine and commentator on the Golf Channel. Rosaforte takes that Watson quote and embellishes: ``He has raised the bar to a level only he can jump. He is something supernatural,'' says Watson on the book jacket.

--One or the other? What ``Raising the Bar'' does with words that ``The Major'' can't necessarily do with a bunch of breathtaking photos is actually dig deeper into the Tiger Phenomenon.

While many Woods bios have dealt with his earlier days on the PGA Tour and end with his `97 Masters win, this covers much of the past three years right up until last August, from his ``slump'' in `98, the reinvention of his swing and the records he squashed on the way to the career grand slam before his 25th birthday (which was Saturday, by the way).

Rosaforte's observations about how Tiger has handled the media crush in the chapter ``Reverse Spin'' reveals Woods has three don't-go-there areas when it comes to reporters' questions: His schedule, his workout program and his girlfriend, Joanna Jagoda.

CAPTION(S):

photo

Photo: ``The Major'' is one of two new books chronicling the rise of Tiger Woods.
COPYRIGHT 2001 Daily News
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2001, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

 
Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Sports
Publication:Daily News (Los Angeles, CA)
Date:Jan 1, 2001
Words:377
Previous Article:SURFING THE TUBE.
Next Article:CYBERSPORTS WHEN OPPORTUNITY CLICKS, DON'T NIX A SPORTS CAREER.


Related Articles
THE TIGER EFFECT WOODS' SUCCESS MOTIVATES OTHERS TO IMPROVE.
`THESE GUYS' REALLY CAN PLAY.
OPEN CAN GO ON; HE'S MADE THE CUT.
SURFING THE TUBE: THE WEEK AHEAD : TODAY.
LEAPING OUT FROM WOODS : SPORT BOOMS WITH HELP FROM TIGER.
TIGER TOPS LOVE ON FIRST HOLE OF PLAYOFF.
SAN FERNANDO STANDING TALL.
NOT WIN TIGER WANTS.
Ducks need Skipper to vault into contention.
IT'S TIGER'S VERSION OF DODGEBALL.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2018 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters