Printer Friendly

OFF THE CUFF.

Byline: ADAM JUPP

IT''S that time of year when the age-old dilemmas raise their ugly heads again.

Who do I buy gifts for, who do I not, who gets a Christmas card, who doesn''t, what to buy those who are getting presents and where will I have Christmas dinner? Most importantly, I have to pin down which days I want off from work.

This might sound like a pleasurable experience. But, instead it is like the world''s greatest game of battleships, trying predict what your colleagues might go for, while considering what Mrs J''s preferences are and, of course, the football fixture calendar. If you stump for a certain set of days, typically the bulk of the office will do the same, causing all manner of internal disputes.

One has to consider whether working with a Christmas hangover or a New Year hangover is preferable and various other delicate conundrums.

Crucially, a precise number of leave-days need to be kept to one side to cover the best and worst case scenarios, taking into account whether you get full the compliment you asked for or whether more holidays are required to cover the days you are actually allowed off. This year, when the annual rumour swept round the office that the rota was due to be issued, there was the usual air of anticipation, with a touch of mutual anxiety.

Those who weren't in were firing off texts and emails, asking if it was true this magical document had been produced and was available for public consumption. And, though a few hours later than expected, it was, finally pinned to the usual red clipboard.

Each of us took ourselves off to digest how we had been treated, some moaning about their lot, other quietly satisfied they had got their wish.

I felt fairly well handled but all of a sudden, something dawned on me -I was not being required to use a single day''s holiday.

By working on bank holidays, weekends and so on during the festive period, I was allowed time off in exchange, meaning I had four days left to burn.

This was too good to be true - more or less the time off I wanted and in return I get... .more days off.

So, I dared to peruse the rota once more, with a view to when I might be able to spend these golden tickets. And while what I got were a few midweek days scattered about here and there, which I would end up having to spend by myself, rattling round the house in my sweatpants, there was something of a buzz about knowing there were a handful of lie-ins on the horizon.

The first of these came earlier this week and I was tingling with excitement. Just because I could, I stayed up a little later and even allowed myself a little tipple - usually a no-no on a school night.

That, of course, led to a lie-in, which I also enjoyed immensely, before bounding down the stairs to spot a note on the kitchen table. It read: "Hi, if you have time it would be great if you could mop the kitchen floor and it would be even better if you could clean the whole kitchen." No, I didn't pass through the recruitment process for MI6 but I managed to crack that code. You know what they say, every silver lining has a cloud.
COPYRIGHT 2009 MGN Ltd.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2009 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:Letters
Publication:Evening Chronicle (Newcastle, England)
Date:Dec 3, 2009
Words:569
Previous Article:Sky-high success for city student.
Next Article:Reader's Poem.


Related Articles
Reader offers solution to blood pressure cuff problem.
A city proud of its welcoming reputation.
OFF THE CUFF.
OFF THE CUFF.
OFF THE CUFF.
OFF THE CUFF.
OFF THE CUFF.
OFF THE CUFF.
OFF THE CUFF.
OFF THE CUFF.

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2021 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters