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ODC/Dance.

ODC/Dance

Yerba Buena Center * San Francisco March 12-28, 2010

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With Waving Not Drowning (A Guide to Elegance), choreographer Brenda Way offered audiences dainty needle pricks, while KT Nelson's Labor of Love cut to the bone. For ODC's spring season, the two premieres joined repertory works by the co-artistic directors, most notably, from 2009, Way's In the Memory of the Forest and Nelson's Grassland.

Taking her inspiration from a French version of Emily Post's book on etiquette (which was probably outdated even when published in 1963), Way used a blessedly light touch for Waving, a modestly amusing foray into the world of socially imposed codes of behavior. Even Anne Zivolich's unruly curls were pulled back into a proper chignon. Composer/singer Pamela Z collaged a lush score of vocalizations and readings from the French manual, including a litany of "should's" that smartly complemented Way's intricate choreography.

ODC's intrepid dancers patiently rearranged themselves and each other into stiff-legged mannequins or alluring photo ops. Waving darkened as the men manipulated the acquiescent women in increasingly self-serving ways until a somnolent Vanessa Thiessen woke up and, at the end of an erotically abusive duet, knocked Jeremy Smith into the wings.

Just when you wondered where Way was going to take these depersonalized male/female encounters, she switched gears. Getting even is fair play, Waving suggested. A robust Yayoi Kambara stripped Aaron Perlstein to his skiwies. Then, armed with reams of paper, scissors, and tape, ODC's women cut, draped, and glued the most fantastical garments on the men. Elizabeth Farotte adorned Corey Brady with a hoop skirt; Thiessen turned Smith into an angel. The results looked almost as good as those on "Project Runway."

More emotionally involving was In the Memory of the Forest, a haunting evocation of a generation that faced exile from everything they knew. Based on Way's memories of her Jewish mother-in-law, the choreography and David and Hi-Jin Hodge's vernal video--which opened with images of the dancers cavorting in a sun-filled forest--suggested sweet nostalgia without a drop of sentimentality. Performing superbly throughout, Kambara and Smith shyly danced the young lovers, Zivolich and Daniel Santos a lustier version of them.

A physically aggressive take on relationship troubles, Nelson's hyper-volatile Labor was set to Mozart's ominous but wistful Piano Concerto No. 20 in D minor. The sound of the women dropping the men like cement bags set off struggles in which partners tried to get away and also hang on. Zivolich pinned down Smith's feet and twisted around his legs as he tried to hop away. Quilet Rarang--who danced like a rocket about to explode--crawled away with Brady on top like a blanket about to suffocate her. The earth seemed to shake as these frantic citizens leapt, fell, scooted, rolled, flailed, and were stepped on. Dragging an inert Santos, Farrotte wore a look of merciless triumph. If this was war, Labor worked towards an armistice in respites of side-to-side waltz steps, quiet walks, or a hug freely given. Finally, the dancers shaped themselves into a wedge, at peace for the moment but ready to go.

A more benign volatility reigned in Nelson's paradise of cohabitation she named Grassland. Egged on by Brazilian composer Marcelo Zarvos' driving score, the dancers resembled pulsating life forms that mutated in the air, on the ground, and underwater. Though Grassland circled back to its opening allusion of nature's cyclical awakening, the tip-toeing walks, overhead stretched arms, and upward glances proposed a dynamic verticality, perhaps a longing toward the light that streamed from above.
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Author:Felciano, Rita
Publication:Dance Magazine
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jun 1, 2010
Words:587
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