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Now, electricity from flaring landfill gas.

Summary: Dubai's vision for sustainable development received a major boost on Monday with the emirate's civic body launching the first ever landfill gas recovery plant that can reduce 250,000 tons of carbon emission per year and produce power by burning methane.

Dubai's vision for sustainable development received a major boost on Monday with the emirate's civic body launching the first ever landfill gas recovery plant that can reduce 250,000 tons of carbon emission per year and produce power by burning methane.

The plant at the Al Qusais landfill of the Dubai Municipality can recover methane emitted from organic waste and convert it into electricity by flaring the gas, making it the first landfill in the region to produce power from landfill gas.

The gas collection system collects landfill gas through an intricately laid network of horizontal and vertical pipes, of over 20km of piping. The collected gas will be flared with a small portion utilised for power in the initial phase.

The Al Qusais landfill is one of the largest sites for municipal waste collection in Dubai receiving about 5,000 tons daily. Landfills traditionally are big emitters of green house gases passively venting harmful gases into the atmosphere with the decomposition of the organic portion of the municipal waste.

With a capacity for flaring 6,000 cubic metres per hour of landfill gas, the new plant will safely dispose methane, a greenhouse gas that constitutes about 55 per cent of the landfill gas and contributes to environmental degradation.

The landfill gas recovery system will operate the flares by utilising a sophisticated gas engine to generate 1MW (1,000 kW) of power. This will be used to operate the high efficiency gas conversion and flare equipment installed at the site.

Director General of the Dubai Municipality Hussain Nasser Lootah, who opened the plant, said the surplus power likely to be generated in future will be connected to the Dubai Electricity and Water Authority's network.

"Our goal is to establish Dubai as a thought leader in green initiatives, and through our new project, we are not only contributing to mitigating the impact of greenhouse gases on environmental degradation but also promoting social well-being," he said.

The gas collection system is implemented by Green Energy Solutions & Sustainability for Dubai Municipality through a 16-year BOT contract.

The system collects landfill gas through an intricately laid network of horizontal and vertical pipes, of over 20km of piping in the landfill site spread over an area of about 3.5 square kilometres.

Construction work for the landfill gas project started in January last year, with horizontal and vertical gas wells being drilled several metres deep into the waste to suck the landfill gas.

Officials said the design and construction implemented on the Al Qusais landfill will help manage odours, and reduce health risks, fire and adverse environmental impacts.

"This will help reduce the bad odour from the landfill and it will be a blessing for the people in the nearby localities," the Head of Waste Treatment Section Naji Alradhi told Khaleej Times.

The landfill is located just opposite dozens of labour accommodation blocks in Sonapur.

Officials said the project is a Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) initiative that is registered with the United Nations under the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change. CDM initiatives can acquire carbon credits proportional to the reduction in green house gas emission.

Business Development Director and Project Manager of Green Energy Solutions & Sustainability Anita Nouri said the company has partnered with another specialised firm to manage the sale of carbon credits.

Without commenting on the expected sale details, she said airlines, aluminium companies or other carbon off-setters interested in lowering their carbon footprint can buy the carbon credits.

Alradhi said the Municipality will get 30 per cent of the deal when the carbon credits from its landfill project are traded.

sajila@khaleejtimes.com

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Publication:Khaleej Times (Dubai, United Arab Emirates)
Date:Jan 15, 2013
Words:659
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