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No place, Louisiana, a novel. (Paperback Fiction).

POUSSON, Martin. No place, Louisiana, a novel. Penguin Putnam, Riverhead. 259p. c2002. 1-57322-976-8. $14.00.

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Readers will feel as entrapped by the fluid writing style and wonderful storytelling skills of this first-time novelist as the characters are ensnared by their Louisiana upbringing, their family's inadequacies and the cultural tentacles that keep them caught in a world of prejudice and unfulfilled aspirations. It is not a comfortable story, and the characters are beset with weaknesses and an inability to communicate with each other, but the writing is strong and the author has no problem communicating the truth of their lives in all of its rawness. He evokes the world of the sixties and seventies in small-town Louisiana, where Louis and Nita barely meet before they marry in order to escape their families. They are unable to express their needs to each other and each imposes unfulfilled wishes on their children.

In many ways, the story is one small failing after another, building to a larger disaster. The characters are unable to change their own course or to reach out to the other, but the reader is given insight to their inner feelings, making their inability to reach each other even more poignant. Nola Theiss, Sanibel, FL
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Author:Theiss, Nola
Publication:Kliatt
Article Type:Book Review
Date:Jul 1, 2003
Words:206
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