Printer Friendly

New wardrobe against X-rays.

Although the hefty lead aprons worn by patients undergoing X-ray procedures can make them feel more securely shielded, such garments can tire and strain medical professionals who must wear them all day. Now, medical physicists at the University of Toronto have developed a lighter alternative. Substituting barium and tungsten powders for some of the lead creates a material that shields as well but weighs less, Martin J. Yaffe, Gordon E. Mawdsley and their colleagues report in the May HEALTH PHYSICS.

Manufacturers of the protective garments typically combine about 6 kilograms of lead powder with about 3 kilograms of rubber or vinyl per square meter of material. Yaffe notes, however, that lead absorbs some kinds of X-rays less well than others. By mixing in barium and tungsten, which effectively absorb those types of X-rays, "you get better absorption over a whole range of energies," he explains. The material thus shields more efficiently, offering the same protection as an all-lead apron but with 20 to 30 percent less weight, he says.
COPYRIGHT 1991 Science Service, Inc.
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 1991, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Title Annotation:using barium and tungsten powders to make lighter X-ray shields
Publication:Science News
Date:Jul 6, 1991
Words:169
Previous Article:Hot time for polymer magnet.
Next Article:Profiling popcorn's perfume.
Topics:


Related Articles
X-ray vision looks inside your plastics.
NOW THEY WANT PLASTICS TO BE HEAVY?
Crystallographers at NBS/NIST.
Acrylic/PVC Alloy. (Buyers' Guide to Thermoplastics).
ASA/AES Alloy. (Buyers' Guide to Thermoplastics).
Particle shower may spotlight loose nukes. (Muon Manna?).
Mass absorption coefficient of tungsten and tantalum, 1450 eV to 2350 eV: experiment, theory and application.
Jupiter as mirror for the sun's X rays.

Terms of use | Copyright © 2017 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters