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New study reports speed limit findings.

New study reports speed limit findings

"The jury is still out" would be an apt description of the results of a new study on the safety impacts of states increasing rural interstate speed limits to 65 m.p.h.

The study was funded by the AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety and conducted by researchers at the University of Maryland's Transportation Studies Center.

In the study, researchers found that in looking at overall date for 34 states (two of which kept limits at 55 m.p.h.), there was an initial impact of increasing speed limits to 65 m.p.h., resulting generally in increased fatalities, but those negative impacts declined over a one-year period, perhaps due to a "learning period" for drivers. The study also revealed that larger states such as California, Texas, and Florida showed no significant long-term change in accidents after raising speed limits, while smaller states showed consistent increases.

Maryland University researchers conducted several in-depth analyses of 14 states whose accident records provided sufficient data for a more comprehensive evaluation covering 13 years before the change to 65 and a two-year period after the change.
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Title Annotation:AAA Foundation on Traffic Safety study on increasing rural speed limits
Publication:Modern Brewery Age
Date:Dec 23, 1991
Words:188
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