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New study paves way for controlling chronic pain.

Washington, Mar 9 (ANI): University of California researchers have discovered a "cross-talk" between two major biological pathways that involve pain-research that may pave the way for new approaches to understanding and controlling chronic pain.

The new study has revealed that analgesia mediated by inhibitors of the enzyme, soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH), is dependent on a pain-mediating second messenger known as cyclic adenosinemonophosphate or cAMP.

"The interaction of many complex biological pathways is essential for the development of persistent pain, whether inflammatory or neuropathic," said lead researcher Bora Inceoglou of the Bruce Hammock lab, UC Davis Department of Entomology.

While conducting the research, the scientists found something they weren't looking for. "To our surprise, we found that cAMP interacts with natural EFAs and regulates the analgesic or pain activity of sEH inhibitors," Inceoglu said.This demonstrates the power of using advance instrumental analysis techniques to better understand the molecular mechanism of biological effects," said Nils Helge Schebb.

"This is like something old, something new, something practical and something basic, too," said Hammock, a distinguished professor of entomology who holds a joint appointment with the UC Davis Cancer Research Center.

The study has been published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). (ANI)

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Publication:Asian News International
Date:Mar 10, 2011
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