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New records of spiny eels (Albuliformes), true eels (Anguilliformes), and bobtail eels (Saccopharyngiformes) in British Columbia, Canada.

ABSTRACT--Trawl samples along the British Columbia coast between 1999 and 2006 revealed many previously undetected species living in deep water. This increase in knowledge underscores the importance of survey collections for non-game fishes, which form a vital link in marine ecosystems. Although there are few records of albuliform fishes in the eastern North Pacific Ocean, Aldrovandia oleosa (Halosauridae) and Polyacanthonotus challengeri (Notacanthidae) are known from British Columbia. The notacanthid Notacanthus chemnitzii is known from off California, Oregon, and Alaska, but until now it was not confirmed from British Columbia. The ranges of these 3 albuliform fishes are updated in this paper. Until now, 7 species of true eels (Anguilliformes) were known to exist in British Columbia based on literature records and museum specimens; Nemichthys scolopaceus, Avocettina infans, Serrivomer jesperseni, Xenomystax atrarius, Thalassenchelys coheni, Venefica ocella and V. tentaculata. Two synaphobranchids, Synaphobranchus affinis and Histiobranchius bathybius, also occur in adjacent waters of Alaska, and until recently S. affinis was thought to exist in British Columbia based on a misidentified specimen. This paper provides a reidentification of the Synaphobranchus from British Columbia as the 1st record of S. brevidorsalis for the province and also adds Nemichthys larseni and Cyema atrum (Saccopharyngiformes) to the diversity of eels now known from British Columbia waters. We also provide significant range extensions for Serrivomer jesperseni, Thalassenchelys coheni, and Venefica tentaculata along the British Columbia coast.

Key words: Aldrovandia, British Columbia, Cyema, Nemichthys, Notacanthus, Polyacanthonotus, Serrivomer, Synaphobranchus, Thalassenchelys, Venefica

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Non-game fishes receive little attention in Canadian coastal waters, and albuliform fishes certainly are under-represented in museum collections and the scientific literature compared to commercially exploited taxa. The halosaur Aldrovandia oleosa was 1st described by Sulak (1977) and, as of 2004, 2 Aldrovandia specimens had been collected west of Moresby and Graham islands (Fig. 1A) but had not been identified to species. Love and others (2005) suggested that the 2 Aldrovandia from British Columbia were A. affinis or A. phalacra, but Kamikawa and Stevenson (2010) identified the specimens as A. oleosa and published the 1st records of that species from British Columbia.

The notacanthids Polyacanthonotus challengeri and Notacanthus chemnitzii have also received little attention, with P. challengeri taken from 3 locations in the southeastern Bering Sea (Mecklenburg and others 2002) and from west of Cape Falcon, Oregon (Stein and Butler 1971), but not in the coastal waters of Washington. In British Columbia, P. challenged was known from only 2 specimens from west of Triangle Island according to Peden (1968) and Hart (1973). Maslenikov and others (2013) reported P. challenged north to 60[degrees]10'N, 179[degrees]41'W (UW 047859), which suggests its range spans the entire coast of British Columbia. In addition, notacanthids are represented in the eastern North Pacific Ocean by N. chemnitzii from Oregon and California (Mecklenburg and others 2002), with the closest record to British Columbia at 45[degrees]54'N 125[degrees]05'W captured 15 May 1963 (BCPM 71194; Peden 1976). Maslenikov and others (2013) reported 2 additional specimens of N. chemnitzii from the northern Bering Sea collected in 2008 and 2010, also citing G. Gillespie (from a pers. comm, in Love and others 2005) for a record of N. chemnitzii from Dixon Entrance. Until now, there were no catalogued voucher specimens of N. chemnitzii reported from British Columbia.

True eels also have been under-represented in coastal research in British Columbia. Clemens and Wilby (1949, 1961) listed only the nemichthyid eels Nemichthys avocetta and Avocettina gilli (now Nemichthys scolopaceus and Avocettina infans) from British Columbia. The 1st British Columbia record of the Crossthroat Sawpalate (Serrivomer jesperseni) and range records of Avocettina infans were detailed by Taylor (1967a, 1967b). Peden (1972) outlined the range of the congrid Xenomystax atrarius, and Hart (1973) updated and summarized records of these species. Peden's (1974) records of rare fishes did not add any new eels to the fauna, and Peden and others (1985) only listed Avocettina infans from near Ocean Station Papa (50[degrees]N, 145[degrees]W). Peden and Hughes (1986) added to the range of Serdvomer jesperseni, but it was the only eel mentioned in their report. Unfortunately, their conversion of the original LORAN-C coordinates to 49[degrees]55'N, 126[degrees]35'W put the collection site of this eel on Vancouver Island, about 5 km east of Tahsis.

Mecklenburg and others (2002) mentioned that the cutthroat eels Synaphobranchus affinis and Histiobranchus bathybius were known from Alaskan waters, but despite the widespread range of these species in the Pacific Ocean, cutthroat eels had not been found in British Columbia. Mecklenburg and others (2002) also mentioned that the colocongrid eel Thalassenchelys coheni was known from British Columbia, based on specimens from the Royal British Columbia Museum (RBCM; Peden 1998, 2002; K Sendall, pers. comm.), and another specimen from west of Vancouver Island at 49[degrees]58'N, 130[degrees]32'W (AB 95-32) was reported by BL Wing as the northernmost record. Love and others (2005) summarized the ranges of all species reported in the literature for the Pacific coast of North America.

Nettastomatid eels (Duckbill Eels) were added to the British Columbian fauna based on samples from deep-water surveys west of Moresby Island and Vancouver Island (Hanke and Roias 2012). Several of their specimens originally had been misidentified as Serrivomer jesperseni and catalogued accordingly in the RBCM collection. A re-examination of these putative Serrivomer specimens was prompted by the collection of a duckbill eel in 2006 that initially had been identified as Serrivomer jesperseni. Based on this material, Hanke and Roias (2012) found that both Venefica ocella and V. tentaculata were present in British Columbia.

Until now, there were 7 species of eels thought to exist in British Columbia based on literature records and museum specimens (with the 2 synaphobranchids S. affinis and H. bathybius in adjacent waters of Alaska). Hanke and Roias (2012, fig. 3) listed S. affinis from British Columbia based on a single unpublished record of a museum specimen (RBCM 010-00197-005), which as demonstrated in this paper, had been misidentified. Their paper also erroneously listed H. bathybius from British Columbia.

New unpublished range records exist due to offshore survey sampling conducted between 1999 and 2006 by Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) and RBCM staff while aboard the CCGS W.E. Ricker. Specimens retained from trawls were preserved and added to the ichthyology collection of the RBCM. This paper updates the known range of Polyacanthonotus challengeri and reports the 1st specimens of Notacanthus chemnitzii in British Columbia. Furthermore, new eels were taken during recent survey sampling, and here we report the 1st records of Cyema atrum and Synaphobranchus brevidorsalis in British Columbia, and additional range records for Thalassenchelys coheni, Venefica tentaculata, and Serrivomer jesperseni. We also demonstrate that the record of the northernmost Pale Snipe Eel, Nemichthys larseni mentioned by Mecklenburg and others (2002), actually was collected from within the Canadian Exclusive Economic Zone based on coordinates provided and represents a 1st record for British Columbia waters. Synaphobranchus affinis and H. bathybius are still not known from British Columbia despite their presence in the Bering Sea and more southerly regions.

METHODS

Between 1999 and 2006, the Department of Fisheries and Oceans performed deep-water sampling to determine the viability of a Tanner Crab (Chionoecetes tanneri) fishery, using a Campelen 1800 shrimp trawl deployed from the Canadian Coast Guard stem trawler W. E. Ricker. The systematic survey plans, locations surveyed, and methods are detailed by Gillespie and others (2004) and Workman and others (2000). Organisms in the catch were identified to lowest possible taxon. Damage to specimens prevented identification of some fishes, but fishes that had been rarely collected, represented range extensions, or were 1st records for British Columbia were taken for preservation.

All specimens were fixed in 10% formaldehyde, after freezing for larger specimens, and preserved in 70% ethanol. All specimens are catalogued in the RBCM ichthyology collection (Table 1). Unless otherwise noted, catalog numbers refer to lots of single specimens.

RESULTS

Order Albuliformes

Family Notacanthidae

Polyacanthonotus challengeri (Vaillant 1888)--Longnose Tapirfish

Material Examined: RBCM 003-00004-001 (2 specimens).

The 1st record of this species in British Columbia was published by Peden (1968), with 2 specimens taken 11 September 1964 in a shrimp trawl off Triangle Island (50[degrees]54'N, 130[degrees]06'W) from 2196 m maximum depth. The specimens are cataloged at the University of British Columbia (listed as BC 64-444 in Peden [1968], but now as UBC 640444). Other specimens from the North Pacific Ocean have come from the Bering Sea, offshore of southern Honshu, Japan, and offshore of Cape Falcon, Oregon (Love and others 2005). The species is thought to be circumglobal with an anti-tropical distribution between 830-3753 m depth (Mecklenburg and others 2002; Love and others 2005).

Two new specimens have been found from British Columbia, catalogued as RBCM 003-0004-001 (Fig. 2), and represent the northern record within British Columbia at 54[degrees]05'N, 137[degrees]07'W, northwest of Graham Island, Haida Gwaii (Fig. 1B) at a depth of 2083 m. It is likely that Polyacanthonotus challenged has a continuous range along the British Columbia coast given its range from Alaska to northern Oregon. The species has yet to be confirmed from Washington.

Notacanthus chemnitzii Bloch, 1788--Snubnosed Spiny Eel

Material Examined: RBCM 003-00004-006, RBCM 010-00337-002 (2 specimens), RBCM 010-00511-003, RBCM 010-00212-001, RBCM 010-00215-003.

Notacanthus chemnitzii (Fig. 3) is benthopelagic, known from depths of 128-3285 m, and is likely distributed worldwide (Mecklenburg and others 2002). Peden (1976) reported 4 specimens of N. chemnitzii off Oregon at a maximum depth of 1544 m. Other records exist for California (Lea and Rosenblatt 1987), Japan, and the Sea of Okhotsk (Love and others 2005). Maslenikov and others (2013) reported 2 specimens of N. chemnitzii from the northern Bering Sea (UW 118602 at 59[degrees]21'N, 178[degrees]27'W; UW150120 at 59[degrees]21'N, 178[degrees]21'W), but there are no records from Washington.

Fourteen N. chemnitzii specimens have now been collected within British Columbia waters (Table 1, Fig. 1C), and these represent the 1st published records for British Columbia, with 6 preserved as museum specimens. Of the 9 collected in 2006, 3 were from within the known latitudinal range and so were not catalogued in the RBCM research collection (Table 1). For the same reason, 5 taken in 2004 were not kept. The specimens reported here were taken in trawls ranging between 1480 to 2400 m maximum depth. Notacanthus chemnitzii likely ranges along the entire British Columbia coast from the northern tip of Haida Gwaii to Vancouver Island.

Order Anguilliformes

Suborder Congroidei

Family Colocongridae

Thalassenchelys coheni Castle and Raju, 1975 Transparent Eel

Material Examined: RBCM 996-00008-001, RBCM 003-00002-001, RBCM 003-00002-001, RBCM 010-00327-001, RBCM 010-00196-011.

Thalassenchelys coheni (Fig. 4) was described by Castle and Raju (1975), with additional details provided by Smith (1979) and Shimokawa and others (1995). This species was originally assigned to the family Chlopsidae (Xenocongridae) by Castle and Raju (1975), but Smith (1979, 1994) and Lavenberg (1988) designated Thalassenchelys and its included species as incertae sedis at the family level. The species now has been placed in the family Colocongridae after analysis of mitochondrial DNA (Lopez and others 2007). These eels are known only from leptocephalus larvae, but some have been found with developing eggs, leading to speculation that the species is either neotenic or the adult stage is extremely short-lived (Eschmeyer and others 1983; Mecklenburg and others 2002).

The species is distributed from Baja California to British Columbia off North America, and across the Pacific nearly to Japan (Shimokawa and others 1995; Mecklenburg and others 2002; Love and others 2005). Mecklenburg and others (2002) list 2 occurrences of T. coheni in British Columbia waters, with the northernmost specimen in the eastern Pacific off northern Vancouver Island at 49[degrees]58'N, 130[degrees]32'W, in less than 15 m of water (catalogued in the US National Marine Fisheries Service Auke Bay collection as AB 95-32). Three other specimens exist at the RBCM (Table 1). The new records presented here fill in the range (Fig. 5A) and suggest the species is regularly present along the British Columbia coast.

Family Synaphobranchiidae

Synaphobranchus brevidorsalis Gunther, 1887 Short-dorsal Cutthroat Eel

Material Examined: RBCM 010-00197-005.

The Shortdorsal Cutthroat Eel (Fig. 6) is a circumglobal species found between 40 [degrees]S and 40[degrees]N according to Sulak and Shcherbachev (1997) and hitherto unknown in the North Pacific. The species ranges between 2302960 m, with most taken between 1000 and 2500 m, and in water ranging between 2.4[degrees] and 5.2[degrees]C (Sulak and Shcherbachev 1997).

The 1st synaphobranchid recorded for British Columbia is a 996-mm specimen (Fig. 6A-C) collected 8 October 2006 from a maximum depth of 1751 m over Paul Revere Ridge, west of the north end of Vancouver Island (Fig. 5B, Table 1). The specimen of Synaphobranchus brevidorsalis from British Columbia was identified using the key in Sulak and Shcherbachev (1997) and can be easily distinguished from S. ajfinis by the position of the dorsal-fin origin relative to the anus. In S. ajfinis, the anus is within 1 pectoral-fin length of the dorsal-fin origin; in S. brevidorsalis the dorsal fin originates far behind the anus. Synaphobranchus brevidorsalis also lacks enlarged teeth on the vomer, and as a result can be distinguished from S. oregoni. Synaphobranchus oregoni has large teeth on the anterior end of the vomer that are nearly the same length as the premaxillary teeth (Sulak and Shcherbachev 1997:1171, fig. 8b, c). Synaphobranchus brevidorsalis and S. oregoni also differ in both scale shape and reticulation (Sulak and Shcherbachev 1997:1171, fig. 9b, c).

We note that 2 other synaphobrachiids are known from Alaska. Syjwphobranchus ajfinis is known from the Bering Sea between the Pribilof Islands and Unalaska Island (Mecklenburg and others 2002; Love and others 2005) and H. bathybius from west of the Pribilof Islands (Mecklenburg and others 2002; Love and others 2005).

Family Nemichthyidae

Nemichthys larseni Nielsen and Smith, 1978 Pale Snipe Eel

Mecklenburg and others (2002) mentioned a record of Nemichthys larseni (AB 95-39) from 47[degrees]56'N, 131[degrees]26'W, at a maximum depth of 300 m. When plotted, these coordinates refer to a position between Warwick and Springfield Seamounts, roughly 18.5 km inside the Canadian Exclusive Economic Zone (Fig. 5C), even though at a lower latitude than the northern tip of mainland Washington. This specimen represents the 1st record of the species from British Columbia waters. David G. Smith and Catherine W. Mecklenburg confirmed its identification (Mecklenburg and others 2002). All other pale Nemichthys from British Columbia in the RBCM collection have been identified as N. scolopaceus based on the lateral line pore pattern in which the quincunx is almost twice as wide as high.

Family Serrivomeridae

Serrivomer jesperseni Bauchot-Boutin, 1953--Crossthroat Sawpalate

Material Examined: RBCM 009-00057-011, RBCM 002-00207-001, RBCM 010-00318-008, RBCM 980-299.

Serrivomer jesperseni (Fig. 7) is known from British Columbia to the Gulf of Panama, the central and western Pacific Ocean south of 25 "N, and the Indian Ocean (Mecklenburg and others 2002; Love and others 2005). The 2 published accounts of British Columbia specimens include 1 taken off Cape St. James, Haida Gwaii at 51[degrees]36'N, 131[degrees]09'W, at 730-825 m depth (Taylor 1967a, 1967b), and 1 taken off Estevan Point, Vancouver Island, in water 336512 m deep (Peden and Hughes 1986).

The collection location for this 2nd Serrivomer has been poorly documented. The original LORAN-C coordinates from the M/V Arctic Harvester (29271-29330, 14452-14386) were converted to latitude and longitude in the original museum catalog notes, and 48[degrees]55'N, 126e[degrees]35'W was specified for RBCM 980-299. Peden and Hughes (1986) provided the following coordinates in their paper for the same specimen: 49[degrees]55'N, 126[degrees]35'W. Their coordinates put the collection position on Vancouver Island at about 730-m altitude, roughly 5 km east of Tahsis. The original coordinates from the museum catalogue put the specimen in water at least 800 m deep in Clayoquot Canyon. The date of collection of this 2nd Serrivomer also is problematic, given that RBCM 980-299 has a collection date ranging from 31 March to 4 April 1980, and Peden and Hughes (1986) simply stated April 1980 as the collection date.

No Serrivomer specimens are known from Alaska (Mecklenburg and others 2002; Love and others 2005). Until now, the Cape St. James specimen represented the northern record in British Columbia.

Three new specimens of Serrivomer have surfaced in British Columbia since July 1999 (Table 1) and serve to fill gaps in the range of the species. The northernmost specimen (RBCM 010-00318-008) is from west of the northern tip of Graham Island, Haida Gwaii at 54[degrees]04'N, caught on 2 September 2002, from a maximum depth of 2083 m. The new locations for S. jesperseni from British Columbia are marked on Fig. 5D and detailed in Table 1.

Family Nettastomatidae

Venefica tentaculata Garman, 1899--Sorcerer Eel

Material Examined: RBCM 003-00004-009, RBCM 012-00132-002.

Hanke and Roias (2012) gave the 1st report of Venefica in British Columbia based on a reexamination of fishes originally identified as S. jesperseni collected during Tanner Crab surveys. The RBCM collection also contains a specimen of Venefica tentaculata (RBCM 003-00004-009) collected and misidentified as Avocettina infans in 2002.

The tail of RBCM 003-00004-009 is damaged and some measurements were not possible; however, other measurements compare best with those of V. tentaculata, following Hanke and Roias (2012). This newly discovered specimen (Fig. 8) represents a significant extension of the known range from 50[degrees]33'N to 54[degrees]04'N, northwest of Haida Gwaii (Fig. 5E). This northernmost record greatly increases the probability that duckbilled eels will be found in Alaskan waters.

Order Saccopharyngiformes

Suborder Cyematoidei

Family Cyematidae

Cyema atrum Gunther, 1878--Black Bobtail Eel

Material Examined: RBCM 010-00200-004.

This species was known from Panama north to Oregon and west to Japan in the North Pacific Ocean, and is considered widespread in temperate to tropical waters of all oceans (Mecklenburg and others 2002; Love and others 2005). In the eastern North Pacific Ocean, it was known north to Tillamook Head, Oregon (45[degrees]45'N, 125[degrees]09'W) at a depth of 1646 m (Grinols 1966).

In 2006, a single specimen of Cyema atrum (Fig. 9) was collected in a bottom trawl west of the north end of Vancouver Island from 1890 m depth (Fig. 5F; Table 1). This record is the 1st for British Columbia and greatly extends the range of this species beyond Tillamook Head, Oregon, in the eastern North Pacific Ocean.

DISCUSSION

Increased sampling along the British Columbia coast during bottom-trawl surveys between 1999 and 2006 revealed many additional species living in deep water offshore of the Canadian Pacific coast. This increase in knowledge underscores the importance of survey collections. New additions to the fish fauna and range extensions of species already known to occur in the eastern North Pacific Ocean (Taylor 1967a, 1967b; Peden 1968, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1979a, 1979b; Stein and Butler 1971; Peden and Anderson 1978, 1981; Stein and Peden 1979; Peden and Ostermann 1980; Peden and Hughes 1986; Anderson and Peden 1988; Mecklenburg and others 2002; Love and others 2005; Kamikawa and Stevenson 2010; Hanke and Roias 2012; Maslenikov and others 2013) would be harder to detect without repeated survey sampling.

The present checklist of albuliform, anguilliform, and saccopharyngiform fishes from the British Columbia coast is detailed in Table 2. We expect the ranges of halosaurid and notacanthid fishes to be continuous from California to Alaska, even though there are no published records of A. oleosa from the coast of Oregon and Washington, and N. chemnitzii and P. challengeri have not been reported from Washington. We also now know that at least 10 eel species exist in British Columbia, with a total of 12 in the eastern North Pacific Ocean, including H. bathybius and S. affinis from Alaska (Mecklenburg and others 2002; Love and others 2005). Additional deep-water sampling will help resolve each species' range and likely will reveal additional species.

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

Thanks to RBCM volunteer Jody Riley for helping sort specimens from the newly acquired material at the RBCM and for keeping records of all changes to the RBCM catalog and ichthyology collection, and to Heidi Gartner for cataloguing a frozen Notacanthus specimen on short-notice and retrieving Auke Bay Museum data for AB 95-32. Thanks to Catherine Mecklenburg for confirmation of the identity of Nemichthys larseni (AB 95-39) and discussions on the collection of this fish relative to the Canadian EEZ border. Thanks also to K Maslenikov and M Love for their reviews and comments that improved the original manuscript.

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* Unpublished.

Submitted 2 January 2014, accepted 2 April 2014.

Corresponding Editor: James W Orr.

GF HANKE

Royal BC Museum, 675 Belleville Street, Victoria, BC, V8W 9W2 Canada; ghanke@royalbcmuseum.bc.ca

G GILLESPIE, K FONG, AND J BOUTILLIER

Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Pacific Biological Station, Nanaimo, BC, V9T 6N7 Canada

AE PEDEN

Royal BC Museum, 675 Belleville Street, Victoria, BC, V8W 9W2 Canada

JM BEDARD

Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 2Y2 Canada

TABLE 1. Locality records for 3 albuliform, 5 anguilliform, and 1
saccopharyngiform species along the coast of British Columbia; *
indicates damage and truncated length measurement; ** = length of N.
larseni is approximate, see Mecklenburg and others (2002, p 127); N/K
= not kept; AB = Auke Bay Museum collection.

                     Date dd/mm/                      Length
RBCM Cat#               yyyy           Species         (mm)

HALOSAURIDAE
004-00067-006        07 Sep 2004   Aldrovandia         426
                                     oleosa
004-00076-009        10 Sep 2004   Aldrovandia         499
                                     oleosa

NOTACANTHIDAE
003-00004-006        02 Sep 2002   Notacanthus         480
                                     chemnitzii
010-00337-002        07 Sep 2004   Notacanthus         551
                                     chemnitzii
010-00337-002        07 Sep 2004   Notacanthus         494
                                     chemnitzii
010-00511-003        07 Oct 2006   Notacanthus         336
                                     chemnitzii
010-00215-003        08 Oct 2006   Notacanthus         716
                                     chemnitzii
010-00212-001        17 Oct 2006   Notacanthus         388
                                     chemnitzii
N/K                  30 Aug 2004   Notacanthus          --
                                     chemnitzii
N/K                  05 Sep 2004   Notacanthus          --
                                     chemnitzii
N/K                  06 Sep 2004   Notacanthus          --
                                     chemnitzii
N/K                  08 Sep 2004   Notacanthus          --
                                     chemnitzii
N/K                  10 Sep 2004   Notacanthus          --
                                     chemnitzii
N/K                  10 Oct 2006   Notacanthus          --
                                     chemnitzii
N/K                  13 Oct 2006   Notacanthus          --
                                     chemnitzii
N/K                  17 Oct 2006   Notacanthus          --
                                     chemnitzii
003-00004-001        02 Sep 2002   Polyacanthonotus    492
                                     challengeri
003-00004-001        02 Sep 2002   Polyacanthonotus    475
                                     challengeri
N/K                  30 Aug 2004   Polyacanthonotus     --
                                     challengeri
N/K                  31 Aug 2004   Polyacanthonotus     --
                                     challengeri

COLOCONGRIDAE
996-00008-001        21 Aug 1994   Thalassenchelys     202
                                     coheni
003-00002-001        27 Jul 2001   Thalassenchelys     236 *
                                     coheni
003-00002-001        27 Jul 2001   Thalassenchelys     226
                                     coheni
010-00327-001        30 Aug 2001   Thalassenchelys     236
                                     coheni
010-00196-011        07 Oct 2006   Thalassenchelys     159
                                     coheni
AB 95-32             20 Oct 1995   Thalassenchelys      --
                                     coheni

NEMICHTHYIDAE
AB 95-39             30 Oct 1995   Nemichthys          600 **
                                     larseni

SYNAPHOBRANCHIIDAE
010-00197-005        08 Oct 2006   Synapliobranchus    996
                                     brevidorsalis

SERRIVOMERIDAE
009-00057-011        23 Jul 1999   Serrivomer          525
                                     jesperseni
002-00207-001        01 Sep 2001   Serrivomer          529
                                     jesperseni
010-00318-008        02 Sep 2002   Serrivomer          614 *
                                     jesperseni

NETTASTOMATIDAE
003-00004-009        02 Sep 2002   Venefica            746 *
                                     tentaculata
012-00132-002        23 Oct 2006   Venefica            699 *
                                     tentaculata

CYEMATIDAE
010-00200-004        09 Oct 2006   Cyema atrum         128

                                                            Max depth
RBCM Cat#                Latitude           Longitude          (m)

HALOSAURIDAE
004-00067-006        52[degrees] 44'N   132[degrees] 24'W      936
004-00076-009        54[degrees] 04'N   134[degrees] 07'W     2014

NOTACANTHIDAE
003-00004-006        54[degrees] 05'N   134[degrees] 07'W     2083
010-00337-002        52[degrees] 40'N   132[degrees] 30'W     1860
010-00337-002        52[degrees] 40'N   132[degrees] 30'W     1860
010-00511-003        50[degrees] 05'N   129[degrees] 31'W     1830
010-00215-003        50[degrees] 27'N   130[degrees] 07'W     1903
010-00212-001        51[degrees] 14'N   130[degrees] 15'W     1480
N/K                  49[degrees] 42'N   127[degrees] 57'W     1922
N/K                  52[degrees] 04'N   131[degrees] 31'W     1523
N/K                  52[degrees] 20'N   131[degrees] 51'W     2149
N/K                  53[degrees] 04'N   132[degrees] 54'W     1178
N/K                  54[degrees] 06'N   134[degrees] 04'W     2014
N/K                  52[degrees] 10'N   131[degrees] 45'W     2300
N/K                  52[degrees] 22'N   131[degrees] 55'W     2400
N/K                  51[degrees] 12'N   130[degrees] 26'W     2001
003-00004-001        54[degrees] 05'N   134[degrees] 07'W     2083
003-00004-001        54[degrees] 05'N   134[degrees] 07'W     2083
N/K                  49[degrees] 42'N   127[degrees] 57'W     1922
N/K                  50[degrees] 01'N   128[degrees] 07'W     1458

COLOCONGRIDAE
996-00008-001        48[degrees] 40'N   126[degrees] 43'W      350
003-00002-001        48[degrees] 32'N   126[degrees] 23'W        0
003-00002-001        48[degrees] 32'N   126[degrees] 23'W        0
010-00327-001        48[degrees] 42'N   126[degrees] 29'W      563
010-00196-011        49[degrees] 58'N   129[degrees] 23'W     1745
AB 95-32             49[degrees] 58'N   130[degrees] 32'W       15

NEMICHTHYIDAE
AB 95-39             47[degrees] 56'N   131[degrees] 26'W      300

SYNAPHOBRANCHIIDAE
010-00197-005        50[degrees] 13'N   129[degrees] 46'W     1751

SERRIVOMERIDAE
009-00057-011        49[degrees] 07'N   127[degrees] 09'W     1180
002-00207-001        48[degrees] 47'N   126[degrees] 40'W      980
010-00318-008        54[degrees] 04'N   134[degrees] 09'W     2083

NETTASTOMATIDAE
003-00004-009        54[degrees] 04'N   134[degrees] 09'W     2083
012-00132-002        49[degrees] 59'N   128[degrees] 23'W     1807

CYEMATIDAE
010-00200-004        50[degrees] 33'N   129[degrees] 14'W     1890

RBCM Cat#                Gear               Location            Set #

HALOSAURIDAE
004-00067-006        Campelan       west of Englefield Bay,      31
                       1800 trawl     Haida Gwaii
004-00076-009        Campelan       west of Langara Island,      40
                       1800 trawl     Haida Gwaii

NOTACANTHIDAE
003-00004-006        Campelan       northwest of Graham           6
                       1800 trawl     Island, Haida Gwaii
010-00337-002        Campelan       west off Tasu Sound,         32
                       1800 trawl     Moresby Island, Haida
                                      Gwaii
010-00337-002        Campelan       west off Tasu Sound,         32
                       1800 trawl     Moresby Island, Haida
                                      Gwaii
010-00511-003        Campelan       west of Brooks Peninsula,     5
                       1800 trawl     Vancouver Island
010-00215-003        Campelan       west of northern tip of       7
                       1800 trawl     Vancouver Island
010-00212-001        Campelan       Queen Charlotte Sound        25
                       1800 trawl
N/K                  Campelan       southwest of Brooks          10
                       1800 trawl     Peninsula, Vancouver
                                      Island
N/K                  Campelan       west of southern end of      27
                       1800 trawl     Moresby Island, Haida
                                      Gwaii
N/K                  Campelan       west of southern end of      29
                       1800 trawl     Moresby Island, Haida
                                      Gwaii
N/K                  Campelan       west of northern end of      36
                       1800 trawl     Moresby Island, Haida
                                      Gwaii
N/K                  Campelan       west of northern end of      40
                       1800 trawl     Graham Island, Haida
                                      Gwaii
N/K                  Campelan       west of Moresby Island,      16
                       1800 trawl     Haida Gwaii

N/K                  Campelan       west of Moresby Island,      17
                       1800 trawl     Haida Gwaii
N/K                  Campelan       west of Queen Charlotte      27
                       1800 trawl     Sound
003-00004-001        Campelan       northwest of Graham           6
                       1800 trawl     Island, Haida Gwaii
003-00004-001        Campelan       northwest of Graham           6
                       1800 trawl     Island, Haida Gwaii
N/K                  Campelan       southwest of Brooks          10
                       1800 trawl     Peninsula, Vancouver
                                      Island
N/K                  Campelan       west of Brooks Peninsula,    14
                       1800 trawl     Vancouver Island

COLOCONGRIDAE
996-00008-001        Midwater       west of Vancouver Island     --
                       Trawl
003-00002-001        Midwater       west of Vancouver Island     --
                       Trawl          (surface tow)
003-00002-001        Midwater       west of Vancouver Island     --
                       Trawl          (surface tow)
010-00327-001        Campelan       Father Charles Canyon,       12
                       1800 trawl     Vancouver Island
010-00196-011        Campelan       west of Brooks Peninsula,     4
                       1800 trawl     Vancouver Island
AB 95-32             Midwater       west of Vancouver Island     40
                       Trawl

NEMICHTHYIDAE
AB 95-39             40 cm Bongo    between Springfield and      44
                       Net            Warwick Seamounts

SYNAPHOBRANCHIIDAE
010-00197-005        Campelan       Paul Revere Ridge,            6
                       1800 trawl     northwest of
                                      Vancouver Island

SERRIVOMERIDAE
009-00057-011        Campelan       off west coast of             6
                       1800 trawl     Vancouver Island
002-00207-001        Campelan       Clayoquot Canyon, west       19
                       1800 trawl     coast of Vancouver
                                      Island
010-00318-008        Campelan       northwest of Graham           6
                       1800 trawl     Island, Haida Gwaii

NETTASTOMATIDAE
003-00004-009        Campelan       west of the northern tip      6
                       1800 trawl     of Graham Island, Haida
                                      Gwaii
012-00132-002        Campelan       west of Brooks Peninsula,    35
                       1800 trawl     Vancouver Island

CYEMATIDAE
010-00200-004        Campelan       west of the north end of     10
                       1800 trawl     Vancouver Island

TABLE 2. Species and classification of albuliform, anguilliform,
and saccopharyngiform fishes in the eastern North Pacific Ocean;
* = known in this region only from Alaska.

       Order             Suborder            Family

Albuliformes          Notacanthoidei   Halosauridae
                                       Notacanthidae
Anguilliformes        Congroidei       Colocongridae
                                       Congridae
                                       Serrivomeridae
                                       Synaphobranchiidae
                                       Nemichthyidae
                                       Nettastomatidae
Saccopharyngiformes   Cyematoidei      Cyematidae

       Order                      Species

Albuliformes          Aldrovandia oleosa
                      Notacanthus chemnitzii
                      Polyacanthocephalus challengeri
Anguilliformes        Thalassenchelys coheni
                      Xenomystax atrarius
                      Serrivomer jesperseni
                      Histiobranchus bathybius *
                      Synaphobranchus affinis *
                      Synaphobranchus brevidorsalis
                      Avocettina infans
                      Nemichthys larseni
                      Nemichthys scolopaceus
                      Venefica ocella
                      Venefica tentaculata
Saccopharyngiformes   Cyema atrum
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Article Details
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Author:Hanke, G.F.; Gillespie, G.; Fong, K.; Boutillier, J.; Peden, A.E.; Bedard, J.M.
Publication:Northwestern Naturalist: A Journal of Vertebrate Biology
Article Type:Report
Geographic Code:1CANA
Date:Sep 22, 2014
Words:5698
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