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New book reveals host of old English words waiting to be discovered.

London, October 29( ANI ): A new book by Mark Forsyth has unveiled a host of absurd yet evocative old-fashioned English words arranged according to the hours of a typical working day.

It includes words such as lollygagging (spending time aimlessly), mumbudget (to keep quiet) and conny wabble (a mixture of eggs and brandy), the Daily Mail reported.

According to the book, uhtceare is a single Old English word, meaning 'lying awake before dawn and worrying'

Uht (pronounced oot) is 'the restless hour before the dawn', while ceare (pronounced key-are-a) is the Old English word for 'care and sorrow' - emotions that have an annoying habit of striking us slap bang in the middle of the uht.

An expergefactor is anything that wakes you up, the book said.

The word dysania means extreme difficulty in waking up and getting out of bed and clinomania is an obsessive desire to lie down.

Egrote - a fantastically useful word meaning 'to feign sickness in order to avoid work' - better known to us modern folk as 'throwing a sickie'.

And don't get surprised if anybody asked put on your pantofles because it means slippers.

Pantofles are named after Saint Pantouffle, who appears to have been invented, for no apparent reason, in France in the 15th century. ( ANI )

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Publication:Asian News International
Date:Oct 29, 2012
Words:226
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