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New York 'underdeveloped.'

REGIONAL PLANNER

New York |underdeveloped'

While there is currently an oversupply of office space, New York City is not overbuilt by "any overall measure," said Richard Anderson, president of the Regional Plan Association.

New York, Anderson contends, must continue to develop on an economic and social level, if it is to maintain its world position.

Anderson warned the gathering of the Associated Builders and Owners at the Marriott Marquis Hotel: "The global marketplace needs few centers. If Manhattan is not one, Tokyo or London will be."

The leader of the group that is concerned with the coordinated development of the tri-state region offered examples of New York's "underbuilt" condition.

*Improper use of infrastructure investment. If 4 million square feet of new office space in the Times Square redevelopment plan is too much, he said, then two Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) capital programs are too much. We are not, he said, relating our land use with our transportation. This was the reason for the failure of Trump's original plan for the abandoned Penn railyards. *Anderson said we are "squandering" the benefits of urban agglomeration.

*Environmental quality is diminished, he said, with low-density urban sprawl.

*Social interaction in the city, he said, is restrictive as affordable housing is limited to the perifery of the city.

*Public and private cooperation is not pursued to its fullest.

*Upward mobility in the city means a curtailing of transportation.

*Development lacks a "sense of place."

"An underbuilt New York weakens the region and hurts our nation in the global economy," said Anderson.

New York City, said the planner, has set a self-defeating course. The "best and the brightest," he said, are looking for jobs and opportunities in the suburbs. We should concentrate, he said, on bringing the jobs to the underdeveloped parts of the city.

What to Do?

One of the main problems, Anderson

"Underbuilding, underoccupied, incremental, site-by-site negations" characterize the city today, said Anderson. said, is there is no common social and economic plan. "We're all trying to do different things different ways," he said.

The city needs its own strategy, he said, and it should start with the private sector asking government for a response that is "inclusive and participatory." The strategy should also be coordinated with the federal and state governments. We need to make a single plea for a single interest, Anderson said.

The state, he said, must care about its valuable New York City, and not be thinking "What can we steal from the city?"

This comprehensive strategy, Anderson said, must have multifaceted steps. Not since 1969, when Robert Wagner drew up a report, said Anderson, have we given serious thought to Manhattan as a national center.

We must compete, Anderson said, with the high hopes, of such places as Paris, London and Tokyo. "They know what they want to be. They want to be the world capital...What do we aspire to be?

"I think we're underbuild and were too content with it."
COPYRIGHT 1991 Hagedorn Publication
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Copyright 1991, Gale Group. All rights reserved. Gale Group is a Thomson Corporation Company.

Article Details
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Author:Fitzgerald, Therese
Publication:Real Estate Weekly
Date:Jun 19, 1991
Words:493
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