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New Year's celebration.

Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year, usually occurs close to the beginning of the US school year, in September. Apples and honey are two symbols of sweetness, to welcome a sweet new year. We can celebrate the Jewish New Year by making apple plates and bowls to use each year during the family's Rosh Hashanah meal.

These apple plates can be used in many ways. You can put apple slices on it (that you'll dip into honey--mmm!) You can create a clay bowl to use with the plate, which will hold honey for apple dipping. Some students also add a few dipping. Some students also add a few decorative clay apple slices to their plates, to mimic the real fruit.

HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN APPLE PLATE

1. Roll out a slab of clay to an even thickness. If your art department has a slab roller, your teacher can use that to prepare the clay. If you don't have a slab roller, you can use a rolling pin to roll out clay for your plate. Try to make your clay an even thickness, and flat.

2. Cut out your clay in the shape of an apple. You can draw your apple shape on a piece of paper first, cut it out, and then trace around it on the clay, using a pin tool.

3. Cut your New Year's greeting out of clay. The Hebrew used in the examples say "L'Shana Tova," which means "Have a good new year." Be sure to attach your words before bisque firing!

4. After bisque firing, paint your artwork with glazes to decorate.

5. Dip your artwork in an over glaze to make them safe for food to be placed on them.

6. Enjoy using your plates!

Bisque-fired plates and bowl. Hebrew letter, apples slices and grapes made out of clay decorate the artworks

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Apple plates and bowls made by students at Bi-Cultural Day School. Hebrew words are "L'Shana Tava" (good New Year).

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Close-up of apple plates and honey bowl made for Rosh Hashanah, the Jewish New Year.

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Pat Wetzler teaches art at Bi-Cultural Day School in Stamford Connecticut, which offers a dual curriculum of Jewish and secular studies. The art department offers rich and varied media to the students, and the school is fortunate to have a kiln and staff to support a ceramics program for grades K to 8.
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Title Annotation:Hands On
Author:Wetzler, Pat
Publication:ChildArt
Geographic Code:1USA
Date:Jan 1, 2005
Words:402
Previous Article:Gallery.
Next Article:Diana Mazzone shares her experience of the Second Arts Olympiad.
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