Printer Friendly

National Academy of Performing Arts - Hope for Tomorrow.

Byline: Mahrukh Farooq

Pakistan's association with the performing arts, a term which broadly includes the various disciplines of theatre, music and dance, can best be described as a love-hate affair. Over the past few decades, the country has produced many talented persons in acting and music and some of them have even gone on to represent Pakistan on the international stage. Yet, due to certain conservative and religious factions in the society, the performing arts in Pakistan was always kept in shackles, restricted from spreading its wings and stopped from growth, which further contributed to spreading an air of cultural confusion and frustration in society.

Due to the entrenchment of Islamists from the 80s onwards, promoting an initiative that was wholly dedicated to focusing on Pakistani culture through the growth and development of the performing art was always a challenge. Since the performing arts have been considered primary forms of expression, their attempts to portray the social injustices that take place on a regular basis in the Pakistani society were always stifled. What was evident were the lowbrow versions of commercial theatre regarded as immature and uncultured by a good part of Pakistani society.

It was during these times that Zia Mohyeddin, as part of an initiative headed by the then President of Pakistan, Gen. Pervez Musharraf, established the country's first training institute for the performing arts in 2005 - the National Academy of Performing Arts - or NAPA. The objective of the institution was to keep Pakistan's rich cultural texture alive through the development and promotion of the performing arts and provide the youth with a platform that would help develop their skills.

"We, at NAPA are acutely aware that in every society there is only a small creative minority which keeps the flame of its country's culture alive. This creative minority is the most valuable asset of a society," says the mission statement on the official website. "NAPA empowers its graduates to go forth with zeal to establish and promote a positive regard for higher accomplishment in the Performing Arts."

NAPA claims to be one of the few institutions in the country that treats the performing arts as an academic discipline rather than as an abstract form of practice. "It is only now that people have begun to view the performing arts as something that requires serious academic study," says Arshad Mahmud, the Director of Programmes and Administration at NAPA. "Our programmes are designed to enable students to learn the basic foundations associated with the arts as well as apply them in a way that allows them to utilize their creativity and imagination."

For the purpose of providing students with an environment designed to channel their artistic talents, NAPA currently offers three-year Diploma programs in both Theatre and Music. The institute's Theatre Arts department comprises acting, directing and script writing. Many courses offered in the programme relate to other aspects of theatre production such as lighting, costume design and make-up. Students interested in music may apply for either the three-year Diploma Programme or an eight-month Certificate Programme. Both provide training in singing and musical instruments.

In order to further facilitate students in the training of both disciplines, NAPA also offers a library comprising books and audio/visual material, a music studio equipped with the most advanced internationally known sequencing software, a lighting studio to enable students to learn about lighting and an in-house theatre which is currently under construction and is expected to be the first professionally equipped theatre in the country with state-of-the-art facilities for music and theatre performances.

Of course, no matter how academically sound an institution's curriculum may be, it cannot substitute for an experienced teacher. For both its theatre and music departments, NAPA has employed some of Pakistan's most talented individuals to serve as its faculty. These include Rahat Kazmi, Anjum Ayaz, Dr. Enver Sajjad, Khaled Ahmed, Talat Hussain, Kamaluddin Ahmed, Zain Ahmed for theatre and Nafees Ahmad, Shallum Asher Xavier, Arshad Mahmud, Salamat Hussain, Intezar Hussain, Mohammed Hussain, Ustad Bashir Khan, Gulab Khan, Umar Jamil and Stephen Chaman for music. All of them are accomplished artistes in their own right.

It is with this armoury of artistic prowess that has enabled NAPA to become a force to be reckoned with, as well as an authority in terms of artistic training in theatre and music. An important force behind NAPA's success is its Board of Directors which has given direction and vision to the organisation and has aligned all aspects of management towards the desired objectives. Each member of the Board comes from a different background and brings with him/her varying perspectives on the development of the performing arts. This, in turn, has injected that much-needed passion that has helped to develop a well-rounded approach towards the management of the institution.

Through regular plays and musical performances, NAPA plans to present Pakistani culture and to promote its drive towards artistic expression in harmony with academic and professional pursuits.

The objective of NAPA's existence can best be described in the words of Zia Mohiyuddin. He states in his official message on the website, "Our objective is to enrich permanently the lives of our students by helping to cultivate and foster in them a love for the beautiful and ennobling arts of music, dance and drama. It is my hope that the National Academy of Performing Arts not only reflects the richness of our artistic traditions but becomes a testimony to the dreams and aspirations of those creative luminaries who are no longer with us."

Zia Mohyeddin

President and CEO, NAPA

"Performance arts are an integral feature of every culture which, in turn, reflects the essence of civilization. We, at NAPA are acutely aware that in every society there is only a small creative minority which keeps the flame of its country's culture alive. This creative minority is the most valuable asset of a society. What is needed now, though, is an inculcation of professionalism towards the art form such that it yields theatre that is thought-provoking. I am not against comedy. I am not against farce and I am not even against what I call the 'theatre of vulgarity'. But there should be some thought-provoking theatre. By thought-provoking, I mean plays that depict the human condition to some extent, sublimate you and make you think as a member of the audience."

Rahat Kazmi

Head of Theatre, NAPA

"The Performing Arts is a dying activity in Pakistan - dying at a faster rate than before. This can be attributed to the overall perception towards the practice of it being socially unacceptable. Through NAPA, we aim to revive this form of art. As of now, the future of theatre in Pakistan seems a bit bleak as it has only been 10 years since NAPA first started its operations. In this span, we have made some headway in the field. One is not without hope. We have a lot of work to do in the area and it is possible that theatre will regain its lost glory. Most people still think that the "arts" are an extra-curricular activity and as such is worthy of only minor attention. Over the years, I have learned that when you have nothing, not even hope, then people turn to the performing arts as their salvation."

Arshad Mahmud

Music

"In any society, the number of people associated with the arts is always small, but they become a very significant part of that community in documenting society. I think NAPA has created this minority. What we need to develop is a ticket-buying audience, even of two or three thousand; that's enough. This is not a money-driven field. It is a passion-driven field all over the world. The students who come to NAPA are those who want to pursue the performing arts, come what may. They have withstood parental opposition and logistical and financial hardship to arrive here."

Khalid Ahmed

Theatre

"One factor which is our strength, as well as our limitation, is the fact that all our students come from very modest, even low-income backgrounds. And many of them have a very poor quality of education. When they study and train here, the transformation that they undergo in their three years is very encouraging to watch. We can proudly say that we have produced a crop of graduates who are good at their art and craft, and who are recognised as good actors and directors."

NAPA Theatre Faculty

Dr. Enver Sajjad teaches playwriting at NAPA and is widely regarded as the architect of modern Urdu fiction. He has written extensively for both the television and film industry and is currently working as the Head of Geo TVs Script Department.

Kamaluddin Ahmed, a renowned make-up artiste for special effects, Kamaluddin Ahmed founded the Department for Makeup when Pakistan Television (PTV) first started its transmission. He even taught makeup at the PTV Academy for several years. Currently, he is teaching Theatre Makeup at NAPA.

Zain Ahmed is equipped with a BA Honors Degree in Theatre from York University in Canada, Zain Ahmed has been acting and directing regularly for both stage and television. He taught Drama at BnU, Lahore before moving to NAPA.

Junior Faculty - Akbar Islam, Sunil Shankar, Muhammad Fawad Khan,Uzma Sabeen.

NAPA Music Faculty

Intezar Hussain, a young and aspiring vocalist, Intezar Hussain learned music from Ustad Ilyas Khan of Patiala Gharana and has been singing since the age of 14.

Shallum Asher Xavier, one of the founding members of the immensely popular band, Fuzon, Shallum is an accomplished producer, composer and sessions artiste. He remains an integral part of the Fuzon band which recently celebrated its 12th year in the music industry.

Mohammed Hussain is a distinguished harmonium player who began his career with Radio Pakistan. He accompanied Mehdi Hassan for over 30 years.

Ustad Bashir Khan is a tabla maestro in his own right, Ustad Bashir Khan has inherited the authentic baaj of the famed Punjab Gharana through his ustad, Karim Bux Paima, who was one of the most acclaimed tabla players of his time. Bashir Khan's career consists of numerous collaborations with leading instrumentalists and vocalists from the sub-continent.

Gulab Khan teaches tabla at NAPA and was associated with Radio Pakistan, Hyderabad for a number of years. He was part of the Abida Parveen music group for more than 20 years.

Umar Jameel has earned a degree in Music, particularly Piano, from the Knox College in Illinois, USA along with certification in music and composition from Vienna. He is also a certified piano technician from the Chicago School of Piano Technology.

Stephen Chaman career in music education spans 20 years. He has always held a passion for music and has had the opportunity to teach at numerous prestigious schools in Karachi.

Junior Faculty - Ahsan Shabbir, Arsalan Pervaiz, Nadir Abbas.

Anjum Ayaz

Theatre

"I would like to say to the young generation that they should not lose hope. Despite the dangerous situations and conditions we are living in, they should not lose any hope at all. The world has become one now, a global village. Anything is possible and so when you will work in your own country, create in your country, you will have a feeling like no other."

Talat Hussain

Theatre

"Art represents the socio-economic condition of a country. But when the desire for material gains takes precedence over the need to create for the sake of creation, that is when art takes a backseat and mediocrity takes over. Such is the case of television nowadays. However, as member of faculty at the National Academy of Performing Art (NAPA), it is very encouraging to see the talent that many aspiring actors have exhibited and how many of the institute's graduates have now been able to find a place for themselves in both television and film. NAPA's repertory theatre is currently staging a lot of plays and giving numerous students the chance to showcase their talent and ambition."

Nafees Ahmad

Head of Music, NAPA

"The kind of music that has been created by the students of NAPA has been appreciated both at home and abroad, by experts of both Western classical and Eastern classical styles of music. From the beginning, our philosophy has been to focus on searching for maximum similarities between eastern and western traditions, rather than staying away from each other. Fusion is a way of forging a beautiful relationship, but this takes a lot of thought and time. Playing the beat of the dhol on the drum is not fusion. Both must float towards each other so naturally that one forgets where the two meet."

NAPA Theatre Faculty

Dr. Enver Sajjad teaches playwriting at NAPA and is widely regarded as the architect of modern Urdu fiction. He has written extensively for both the television and film industry and is currently working as the Head of Geo TVs Script Department.

Kamaluddin Ahmed, a renowned make-up artiste for special effects, Kamaluddin Ahmed founded the Department for Makeup when Pakistan Television (PTV) first started its transmission. He even taught makeup at the PTV Academy for several years. Currently, he is teaching Theatre Makeup at NAPA.

Zain Ahmed is equipped with a BA Honors Degree in Theatre from York University in Canada, Zain Ahmed has been acting and directing regularly for both stage and television. He taught Drama at BnU, Lahore before moving to NAPA.

Junior Faculty - Akbar Islam, Sunil Shankar, Muhammad Fawad Khan,Uzma Sabeen.

NAPA Music Faculty

Intezar Hussain, a young and aspiring vocalist, Intezar Hussain learned music from Ustad Ilyas Khan of Patiala Gharana and has been singing

since the age of 14.

Shallum Asher Xavier, one of the founding members of the immensely popular band, Fuzon, Shallum is an accomplished producer, composer and sessions artiste. He remains an integral part of the Fuzon band which recently celebrated its 12th year in the music industry.

Mohammed Hussain is a distinguished harmonium player who began his career with Radio Pakistan. He accompanied Mehdi Hassan for over 30 years.

Ustad Bashir Khan is a tabla maestro in his own right, Ustad Bashir Khan has inherited the authentic baaj of the famed Punjab Gharana through his ustad, Karim Bux Paima, who was one of the most acclaimed tabla players of his time. Bashir Khan's career consists of numerous collaborations with leading instrumentalists and vocalists from the sub-continent.

Gulab Khan teaches tabla at NAPA and was associated with Radio Pakistan, Hyderabad for a number of years. He was part of the Abida Parveen music group for more than 20 years.

Umar Jameel has earned a degree in Music, particularly Piano, from the Knox College in Illinois, USA along with certification in music and composition from Vienna. He is also a certified piano technician from the Chicago School of Piano Technology.

Stephen Chaman career in music education spans 20 years. He has always held a passion for music and has had the opportunity to teach at numerous prestigious schools in Karachi.

Junior Faculty - Ahsan Shabbir, Arsalan Pervaiz, Nadir Abbas.

'NAPA has a bright future.'

In this candid interview, Tariq Kirmani, the Chairman of the Board of NAPA talks to Slogan's Mahrukh Farooq.

How has the experience been for a person like you, who comes from a purely business background, to lead the NAPA Board as its Chairman?

I have been associated with NAPA for the past six to seven years. This entire period has been incredibly rewarding for me. I hope that the members of the board as well as the institution feel the same way! I have a firm belief in the importance of the development of performing arts and the value it can bring to Pakistan. One of the major changes made which I am proud to say I played a great part in, was the induction of a strategic plan along with a proper vision and mission for the organisation for its sustainability. This was created from the groundup; taking into account the perspectives and foresight of individuals from all levels of management, including the faculty as well as the student body. This resulted in everyone being brought on to the same page with regard to the significance of developing the cultural aspect of society as we all believed that this is what truly defines a nation.

We are also extremely grateful for the support of successive governments over the years, without which we wouldn't have been able to get this far.

In what way do you add value to this role?

I have been associated with business, specifically business management, throughout my career. Since I have had the opportunity to work on various local and international assignments, I have developed a deep insight into the management function. Regardless of the kind of company that one works for, the overall manner in which it is managed is more or less the same. Hence, with NAPA it was somewhat easy to channel that particular skill. In addition, the board itself is not required to be involved in the day-to-day management of the institution. The members of the board, including Zia Mohyeddin who is the President and CEO, a man of incredible talent and vision, are there instead, to provide a diverse perspective owing to their vast exposure and experience. Some may come from a purely financial background, others may belong to a marketing discipline, yet, what everyone has in common is a strong passion to see Pakistan's performing arts and culture thrive.

What are your future plans and strategies regarding NAPA and its role in promoting cultural and intellectual poverty in the country?

At present, we are concentrating on a variety of activities that we believe will take this institution forward. We are focused on improving NAPA's curriculum for theatre, music and dance so that students can equip themselves with knowledge related to the theory of all three disciplines. We are also in talks with the HEC to establish ourselves as a degree-awarding institution, because at the moment we are only awarding diplomas. Our students are already benefiting from the experience and knowledge of some of our nation's greatest talents in the performing arts such as Arshad Mahmud, Rahat Kazmi, Talat Hussain and Nafees Ahmed. Through these initiatives, we believe that a greater number of opportunities will be available. We believe this will greatly improve NAPA's standing in society. Another strategy which I plan to implement is the sustainability of NAPA to help further cement its position as Pakistan's national symbol.

It is incredibly important for NAPA to have a face that establishes a link with the outer world, specifically the corporate sector so that it becomes easy to get funding. Although a lot of work is being done in this area, it is still a very slow process. We hope to achieve our goal in the next five to 10 years.

What persuaded you to become a part of such an institution?

I was persuaded by several members of the board, including Jawaid Iqbal, to take up the position after Dr. Ishrat Hussain's term expired. I was very reluctant at first as I felt that it would be very difficult to slip into the shoes of a man like Dr. Ishrat who I believe is an extremely competent individual and has done wonderful things for NAPA. The performing arts sector was never my forte. However, they all insisted after which I ultimately gave in. The position in question is for a fixed tenure which ensures a fresh new perspective each time, something I greatly endorse as it ensures quick and positive change that would be beneficial to the organization.

Do you believe that NAPA has a bright future in Pakistan?

I believe NAPA does indeed have a bright future. This is mainly because it has achieved its status as the only institution that provides quality training in the performing arts. Whenever people talk of the performing arts, they talk of NAPA. It was indeed easier for us considering there was no other institution that provided such training. However, the onus that fell on us for providing a supportive framework within which such programs and systems could efficiently operate was greater. In addition, the perception of Pakistan that existed and which to some extent still exists has proven to be a difficult obstacle to overcome. For this very reason, we figured that it was all the more important to convey information of the presence of such an institution that is in line with that of any other such institution in the civilized world. The exchange programs between our institution and those in Austria and America are a result of that initiative.

Even though NAPA, on its own, represents a very tiny part in this mission, we feel that it still has a responsibility to fulfill. Considering the challenges and the hardships we have faced in the past, I cannot stress hard enough the amount of sheer gratitude I feel towards the past and current governments for the extensive amount of support that they have given us. With hard work and a dose of luck, I believe we will eventually attain what we aimed for.

'Our goal as an academy is dedicated to the development of the performing arts in the Country.'

Arshad Mahmud, Director Programmes and Administration, NAPA, talks to Slogan.

The vibrancy of a city is gauged by the uniqueness of its culture. That, in turn, is measured by the value of its performing arts and cuisine as well as the extent to which they are promoted. Most cities in Pakistan, including Karachi and Lahore, are so far, right on the money when it comes to presenting the distinctive quality of Pakistani food; almost every other month, people are treated to a new eatery that claims to serve a range of delectable delights that tantalize the taste buds. However, what was lacking until some time back was a platform which could enable Pakistani performing arts to grow. The goal was, and still is, to provide local people as well as foreigners with a chance to experience Pakistani culture first-hand through theatre and music.

The initiatives were aimed to revive the liveliness and energy of Pakistani culture. Arshad Mahmud was one of the few people who were driven by the passion to help revive the lost glory and also provide driven and ambitious young people with a platform to give them a compelling voice to express themselves. It was towards this end that the National Academy of Performing Arts (NAPA) was launched in 2005.

Here Arshad Mahmood talks to Slogan about what makes NAPA tick.

What kind of circumstances in terms of the art and music scene prevailed in the 2000s?

Before the creation of NAPA, lawlessness and an overall sense of apathy towards the development of art and music had greatly hindered its growth in Pakistan. As a result, when NAPA first began holding public showings in Karachi in 2007, we would occasionally find ourselves performing to empty halls. The handful of people that did make the effort of coming had no idea of the concept of theatre and were seeing such performances for the very first time. It is only now that people in general have begun to view theatre as a proper academic discipline that requires serious study. Prior to the institution of NAPA, the decision to pursue a career in theatre, art or music was also seen as a display of flippancy or a lack of commitment. Many people were incredibly conservative and thus viewed the practice as something that was not in line with their religious and cultural values and it was a social taboo for them.

To what extent has NAPA contributed to the performing arts in Pakistan?

Our goal as an institute is dedicated to the development of the performing arts in the country. It is also to ensure employment opportunities for our students once they graduate from NAPA. A lot of our graduates are in fact now gainfully employed. The critically acclaimed film 'Moor' which was released in 2015, had up to nine actors from NAPA. Other film productions that were widely appreciated by critics and the public, including 'Na-Maaloom Afraad', 'Actor-in-Law' and 'Karachi Se Lahore', all featured actors who are graduates of this academy. In addition, we have established affiliations with leading institutions in other countries, most notably, the Butler's School of Music which is a part of the University of Texas. The management teams of both institutions have facilitated the transfer of students to and from Pakistan and have encouraged the exchange of ideas by bridging two different cultures.

To further develop the performing arts in Pakistan, we have also established the NAPA Repertory Theatre which stages plays regularly to help encourage the love of theatre amongst the local people and motivate writers to write exclusively for the stage. Apart from this, we have the NAPA International Theatre Festival, the Young Directors' Theatre Festival and the NAPA Children's Festival. I believe as an institution we have contributed extensively to the growth and development of the performing arts in Pakistan.

Is music really dead in Pakistan or should the current lull be taken as a sign of greater things to come?

A large number of people turn towards electronic media as their source for information on everything ranging from politics and sports to entertainment. Sadly, most of our news channels choose to focus on the bad and only the bad, hence the belief that Pakistani music is no more. I believe the main cause behind this perception is that there is a great prevalence of nostalgia for the 90s music; some of the greatest hits of the 90s continue to be rehashed, remixed and replayed over and over at concerts and studio recordings.

So it is only natural for the public to believe that no good music is being made anymore. It is rather unfortunate that many people do not read newspapers nowadays for if they did, they would know that music in Pakistan is indeed not dead. A lot is being done in the name of music. We have collaborated with the leading qawwaals of our country and staged spectacular musical performances that pay tribute to the age-old concept of all-night qawwalis. A number of performances that we have held recently have involved the gathering of talented musicians who have ended up creating a completely new kind of music. And each time, the audience would be thoroughly engaged. So yes, a change is taking place and a new age of music is being ushered in for the general public to listen to and enjoy.

What are the challenges that NAPA has faced and continues to face on a regular basis?

One of the greatest challenges that we have faced throughout the existence of NAPA is funding. Since we are a non-governmental organisation (NGO) and by law a Section 42 company, we do not charge a hefty admission fee from our students. Students looking to enroll in our programs need only pay six percent of the entire admission fees. The remaining 94% is paid by us. Since our main sources of funds are government grants and donations, it is only now that we have begun to charge a price for the plays we have staged as part of the NAPA Repertory Theatre. We do approach corporations occasionally for the purpose of donations; however, we continue to struggle in this area as many businesses are a bit hesitant when asked to fund either a concert or a theatre production. The reason is that they are unable to draw a link between an initiative that seemingly revolves around entertainment and their CSR (Corporate Social Responsibility) objectives.

Some of the other challenges that we face are purely academic-related; although the curriculum that we offer is sound, we have not yet been able to convert our status from a diploma-awarding institution to that of a degree-awarding institution. This, in turn, is affecting our ability to offer scholarships to students as pre-graduation costs are considerably expensive. However, we are currently in talks with the Higher Education Commission (HEC) of Pakistan and we hope that an agreement will be reached soon.

To what extent have international musicians and performers been open towards collaborating with NAPA and the performing arts in Pakistan?

So far, all of our collaborations with foreign entities have been incredibly successful. Even we were surprised! In all our interactions with them, we have found that they were fully willing to accommodate us in every way. I do admit, though, that when we first contacted the head of the department at the Butler's School of Music for the purpose of a possible partnership, we were not treated with much seriousness. In addition, there were language barriers and many of our students, who came from all kinds of backgrounds, were unable to communicate with students from Butler's. However, they ultimately found common ground with music. Once the faculty from the Butler's School of Music heard our students play, they were totally taken aback as it was something that they had never heard before; they found it thoroughly entertaining. This is proof that music transcends borders and that the performing arts have an ambassadorial potential. This would not have been possible had both sides not kept an open mind.

What has the overall response been towards the efforts made by your institution?

Now people have begun to expect something new from us. Every time they approach us, they ask when the next play or musical performance is being held. I believe this is because they are finally getting the chance to see and hear something that is entirely unique and completely original; something which they have never seen or heard before.

Would you say that NAPA has provided both its faculty as well as its student body with chances to learn from one another?

I believe that is true. When we first started, I can say that I was definitely surprised by the quality of talent that came in. However, with each year, my expectations have risen so much that I am no longer taken by surprise! This is because I have a belief that our country has amazing talent that has the potential to do wonderful things for the performing arts in Pakistan. What we have begun doing for the benefit of our students in the past three years or so is to introduce the concept of improvisation or 'improv' which encourages students to counter challenging situations onstage without breaking character. Though they struggled in the beginning, but many students eventually shone in this area and have gone on to make successful careers in theatre.

In what way has NAPA captured the culture of Pakistani society? Has it made endeavours to communicate this culture to the outside world?

We constantly strive to highlight various aspects of Pakistani culture through our stage productions and also take inspiration from other works of literature to create a fusion of sorts; works that are relevant to contemporary society and which people can relate to. An example of this ambition can be found in 2014 when, as a way of commemorating the 450th birth anniversary of William Shakespeare, NAPA collaborated with the British Council on the production of the Urdu rendition of one of his timeless classics, 'A Winter's Tale', titled Fasana-e-Ajaib.

It was very well received by the public because the main storyline of a woman who is accused of adultery and cast out by her husband, was quite relatable, even though it was sans the famed Shakespearean language that many literary enthusiasts have come to know and love. On another occasion, we treated the Austrian Ambassador to Pakistan with a rather unique rendition of her country's national anthem on Austria's National Day. After listening to the extraordinary fusion of the clarinet with sitar, played by the talented Nafees Ahmad, she was actually moved to tears by the display of our musical talent that successfully created a synthesis between two cultures. So in many ways, we have built bridges with the outside world whenever given the chance to fully represent both Pakistani and foreign cultures in an attempt to create a more interactive world.
COPYRIGHT 2016 Asianet-Pakistan
No portion of this article can be reproduced without the express written permission from the copyright holder.
Copyright 2016 Gale, Cengage Learning. All rights reserved.

Article Details
Printer friendly Cite/link Email Feedback
Publication:Slogan
Geographic Code:9PAKI
Date:Apr 30, 2016
Words:5351
Previous Article:Democracy killing democracy.
Next Article:Make in Pakistan.
Topics:

Terms of use | Privacy policy | Copyright © 2021 Farlex, Inc. | Feedback | For webmasters |